Scott Morrison hails 'miracle' as Coalition snatches unexpected victory

The Coalition has been re-elected in a shock result in which Labor lost seats in Queensland, Tasmania and NSW and failed to make more than minimal gains nationally.But former prime minister Tony Abbot...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

Coalition likely to win election in Trump-like upset, but Abbott loses Warringah

Against expectations, Scott Morrison has led the Coalition government back to power.Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-NDWith 57% of votes counted in the election, the ABC is projecting that the Coa...

Adrian Beaumont, Honorary Associate, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne - avatar Adrian Beaumont, Honorary Associate, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne

Infographic: what we know about the results of Election 2019 so far

As of 10.01pm Saturday, May 18 2019:...

Emil Jeyaratnam, Data + Interactives Editor, The Conversation - avatar Emil Jeyaratnam, Data + Interactives Editor, The Conversation

Bob Hawke, the environmental PM, bequeathed a huge 'what if' on climate change

Since the news broke of his passing, Bob Hawke has been feted as the “environmental prime minister”. From saving the Franklin River, to protecting Antarctica from mining, conservationists ...

Marc Hudson, Researcher, University of Manchester, University of Manchester - avatar Marc Hudson, Researcher, University of Manchester, University of Manchester

You are what you vote: the social and demographic factors that influence your vote

Your income, type of work, where you were born, and other social and demographic factors influences your vote more than you may think.The Conversation / ShutterstockAustralia has changed in many ways ...

Rob J Hyndman, Professor of Statistics, Monash University - avatar Rob J Hyndman, Professor of Statistics, Monash University

View from The Hill: Bob Hawke was master of managing government

It’s always easy to romanticise the past – in celebrating the prime ministership of Bob Hawke it is important to remember it had its peaks and troughs.Trouble marked many years – the...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

Vic Stockwell’s Puzzle is an unlikely survivor from a different epoch

Sign up to the Beating Around the Bush newsletter here, and suggest a plant we should cover at batb@theconversation.edu.au.On the western side of Mount Bartle Frere, the tallest mountain in Queensland...

Andrew Thornhill, Research botanist at the Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium of South Australia/Environment Institute, University of Adelaide - avatar Andrew Thornhill, Research botanist at the Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium of South Australia/Environment Institute, University of Adelaide

Vital Signs: for the best election predictions, look to the betting markets, not the opinion polls

It turns out that betting markets are quite good predictors, on average.www.shutterstock.comOpinion polls haven’t done too well in some important recent elections.Polls failed to foresee the Bre...

Richard Holden, Professor of Economics, UNSW - avatar Richard Holden, Professor of Economics, UNSW

What I learned from Bob Hawke: economics isn't an end itself. There has to be a social benefit

When I was growing up in Adelaide in the 1970s I wanted to be like Bob Hawke. Other kids generally wanted to be cricket, football or rock stars. I wanted to be a research officer with the Australian C...

Tim Harcourt, J.W. Nevile Fellow in Economics and host of The Airport Economist, UNSW - avatar Tim Harcourt, J.W. Nevile Fellow in Economics and host of The Airport Economist, UNSW

GetUp!'s brand of in-your-face activism is winning elections – and making enemies

GetUp! protesters outside the second leaders' debate in Adelaide earlier this month.David Mariuz/AAPIt can be hard for a political cause to get noticed in a jaded world awash with information, but con...

Mark Rolfe, Honorary associate, School of Social Sciences, UNSW - avatar Mark Rolfe, Honorary associate, School of Social Sciences, UNSW

VIDEO: Michelle Grattan on the passing of Bob Hawke - and the final campaign push

University of Canberra Deputy Vice-Chancellor Leigh Sullivan speaks to Michelle Grattan about the week in politics. They discuss the passing of former Labor prime minister Bob Hawke and his legacy, as...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

As we face pressing global issues, the pavilions of Venice Biennale are a 21st century anomaly

One of the most powerful images at this year's Venice Biennale is Christoph Büchel's Barca Nostra, 2018-2019, Shipwreck 18th of April 2015. La Biennale di VeneziaThe 58th Venice Biennale of Art o...

Felicity Fenner, Associate Professor at UNSW Art & Design, UNSW - avatar Felicity Fenner, Associate Professor at UNSW Art & Design, UNSW

This is what happens to a baby's body during birth

Delivering a human baby – which has a large, highly developed brain – is risky for mother and baby. jaredandmelanie/flickr , CC BYPregnancy, labour and delivery are incredibly physically ...

Ian Wright, Professor of Paediatrics and Child Health Research, University of Wollongong - avatar Ian Wright, Professor of Paediatrics and Child Health Research, University of Wollongong

Final poll wrap: Race tightens in Ipsos and Dutton just ahead in Dickson, plus many more seat polls

The election campaign is finally coming to an end, with Australians to head to the polls tomorrow.AAP/Bianca de Marchi/Tracey NearmyThe federal election will be held tomorrow. Polls close at 6pm Austr...

Adrian Beaumont, Honorary Associate, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne - avatar Adrian Beaumont, Honorary Associate, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne

The security of your identity, personal information and financial connections should be foremost in your mind when exploring websites on the Internet.



There are crooks out there. There are people who make a vast amount of money from stealing and blackmailing people online. They lie, cheat and steal using every trick in the book and they invent new ways to fool people every day.

It is not just about Nigerian folks who lie about secret fortunes, lost treasure or fake inheritances. There are organized criminal enterprises who use password cracking software to try to break into the 50 million or so websites that are online. They hunt out user names and passwords of members of websites to get access to bank accounts, personal information to steal money or the identity of innocent people to use in other criminal activities.

The first step towards not becoming a victim is to not join sites like dating sites, newsletter groups or buy from dodgy looking websites. The first step there is to look for a site with a URL beginning with "HTTPS" rather than "HTTP". There is some level of security with a HTTPS site. The registrar of the domain name guarantees that the owner of the site has been identified and that data shared is encrypted. Rather than buy from unknown people who want your credit card details, you should consider dealing with businesses that use PayPal which acts as a market place where only PayPal knows your credit card numbers and does not share it with merchants when processing transactions.

Some websites operated by legitimate businesses can be forcibly entered by hackers who use techniques to find the login details of the site administrator. They get access to install software that turns the legitimate site into a virus spreading device. It is the same with emails that you might receive every day from people that you do not know. Curious people click on links, open or view documents and without knowing it, they allow crooks to install software on their PC, smartphone or tablet device. Whether it is Apple's IOS or Android software, hackers have ways to get in.

One of their favourite tricks is to break into someone's email account to get access to the account owner's email contact list. They can then send our mass email malicious content to people who are more likely to open malware containing documents, images and links because it is from a trusted friend or even family members. These email criminals look for .edu email addresses as they have higher credibility with spam filters than a free email account offered from Yahoo.

The best website owners take extraordinary steps to maintain and improve their security procedures. A valuable lesson for owners and site users was the famous Ashley Madison hack. User data was spread around the World when hackers broke into the insecure client data and copied vast amounts of personal data. Financial details like credit cards as well as accurate identity information was stolen and published. You probably would not like that ! An example of a secure site is mansioncasino.com that is reliable and trustworthy

Take care of where you go online, what emails you decide to open, what links you click. Be careful about who you "friend" online on social media pages. Don't give personal information to strangers until you know that they have earned your trust.

When in doubt, do a Google search on sites that you propose to visit or people that you might deal with. Time spent on reconnaissance is never wasted !