How Should You Distribute Your Craft Beer?

So you’ve made your own craft beer and want to start selling it around the country and possibly around the world. Where to begin? It should be straightforward but the food and beverage industry is...

News Company - avatar News Company

The Mobile Liberation and Imprisonment

We all walk around with a device in our pockets that are capable of things that go way beyond just calling someone. They are little entertainment and communication devices that have shaped our daily r...

News Company - avatar News Company

3 lessons from behavioural economics Bill Shorten's Labor Party forgot about

Three simple lessons from behavioural economics would have helped the Labor Party sell its economic credentials.www.shutterstock.comThe Australian Labor Party’s 2019 election campaign showed a d...

Tracey West, Lecturer in Behavioural Finance, Griffith University - avatar Tracey West, Lecturer in Behavioural Finance, Griffith University

‘Bright white skeletons’: some Western Australian reefs have the lowest coral cover on record

Corals at Scott Reef in 2012, and at the same site during the 2016 mass bleaching.James Gilmour/AIMSDiving on the remote coral reefs in the north of Western Australia during the world’s worst bl...

James Paton Gilmour, Research Scientist: Coral Ecology, Australian Institute of Marine Science - avatar James Paton Gilmour, Research Scientist: Coral Ecology, Australian Institute of Marine Science

From sharks in seagrass to manatees in mangroves, we've found large marine species in some surprising places

When we think of mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and saltmarshes, we don’t immediately think of shark habitats. But the first global review of links between large marine animals (megafauna) a...

Michael Sievers, Research Fellow, Global Wetlands Project, Australia Rivers Institute, Griffith University - avatar Michael Sievers, Research Fellow, Global Wetlands Project, Australia Rivers Institute, Griffith University

Aboriginal mothers are incarcerated at alarming rates – and their mental and physical health suffers

Being separated from their children affects the mental well-being of Aboriginal mothers in prison.ChrisMilesProductions/ShutterstockAboriginal women are the fastest growing prison population in Austra...

Sacha Kendall, Post-doctoral research fellow in public health, University of Technology Sydney - avatar Sacha Kendall, Post-doctoral research fellow in public health, University of Technology Sydney

How close is Sydney to the vision of creating three 30-minute cities?

Sydney CBD is highly accessible and remains clearly the dominant centre in the metropolitan region.Holli/ShutterstockThe Greater Sydney Commission has proposed a 40-year vision of a metropolitan regio...

Somwrita Sarkar, Senior Lecturer in Design and Computation, University of Sydney - avatar Somwrita Sarkar, Senior Lecturer in Design and Computation, University of Sydney

Hidden women of history: Ennigaldi-Nanna, curator of the world's first museum

The National Museum of Iraq photographed in February 2018. Many of the pieces discovered at the ruins of Ur, arranged and labelled by Ennigaldi-Nanna, can be found here.Wikimedia CommonsIn this series...

Louise Pryke, Lecturer, Languages and Literature of Ancient Israel, Macquarie University - avatar Louise Pryke, Lecturer, Languages and Literature of Ancient Israel, Macquarie University

The 'pulse' of a volcano can be used to help predict its next eruption

The 2018 eruption of Kilauea volcano was preceded by damage of the magma plumbing system at the summit.Courtesy of Grace Tobin, 60 Minutes, Author providedPredicting when a volcano will next blow is t...

Rebecca Carey, Senior Lecturer in Earth Sciences, University of Tasmania - avatar Rebecca Carey, Senior Lecturer in Earth Sciences, University of Tasmania

Queensland paper backtracks after using violent imagery to depict Annastacia Palaszczuk

Social media backlash and a Queensland government complaint to the Australian Press Council has forced the Sunshine Coast Daily to apologise to its readers for picturing Queensland Premier Annastacia ...

Jenna Price, Senior lecturer, University of Technology Sydney - avatar Jenna Price, Senior lecturer, University of Technology Sydney

Bowen carries baggage into Labor leadership contest

Shadow treasurer Chris Bowen is running for Labor leader, despite carrying the baggage of being the architect of election policies, especially on franking credits, now being blamed after Saturday&rsqu...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

US-China relations are certainly at a low point, but this is not the next Cold War

Though a Cold War between China and the US seems unlikely, there are still repercussions of a deepening rift.Roman Pilipey/EPATrump’s long-threatened trade war with China is now a reality. Beiji...

Nick Bisley, Head of Humanities and Social Sciences and Professor of International Relations at La Trobe University, La Trobe University - avatar Nick Bisley, Head of Humanities and Social Sciences and Professor of International Relations at La Trobe University, La Trobe University

Here's how to make opinion polls more representative and honest

Better opinions polls are more expensive because pollsters need to spend more effort getting a representative and honest sample of voters.ShutterstockIn 2012, US statistician Nate Silver correctly pre...

Adrian Barnett, Professor of Statistics; President of the Statistical Society of Australia, Queensland University of Technology - avatar Adrian Barnett, Professor of Statistics; President of the Statistical Society of Australia, Queensland University of Technology

After Clive Palmer's $60 million campaign, limits on political advertising are more important than ever

Clive Palmer didn't win any seats for his party in the election, but he says his massive advertising spend was "worth it" to prevent Bill Shorten from becoming prime minister.Darren England/AAPCan bil...

Marian Sawer, Emeritus Professor, School of Politics and International Relations, Australian National University - avatar Marian Sawer, Emeritus Professor, School of Politics and International Relations, Australian National University

Bricks-and-mortar retail stores are under intense pressure from online competition. Feeling the most heat are clothes shops and department stores.

This year David Jones’s profit halved, to A$64 million. Myer declared a “disappointing” A$486 million loss. German giant Esprit, whose global sales have fallen 40% in four years, has shuttered its Australian operations. The US-based Gap closed its last Australian store back in February. Other brands to have collapsed include Metalicus, Oroton, Marcs, David Lawrence and Pumpkin Patch.

What to do?

One answer is to invest in and enhance those aspects of the shopping experience that online retailers just can’t provide.

To do so department stores and clothing retailers are drawing on consumer behaviour and psychological research to make themselves more appealing – sometimes without shoppers even consciously realising it.

Here are three of the most significant strategies.

Home is where your heart is

Shopping from home is comfortable. You can do it in your time. You feel no pressure to hurry up and buy something. You can do it in your pyjamas.

To compete against the home shopping experience, retailers are exploring how to make you feel more at home in their stores. Tactics involve evoking sensory familiarity through furnishings, lighting and even scents.

Men’s clothing retailer Rodd & Gunn is taking the homeliness vibe to its logical extreme, with shop fit-outs that mimic an actual home.

Rodd & Gunn’s ‘experiential’ retail store in Chadstone, Melbourne. Rodd and Gunn blog

The picture above shows Rodd & Gunn’s “experiential store” in Chadstone, Melbourne. There’s a slanted wood-panelled ceiling to evoke a real house roof. In the centre of the shop floor is a “living room” space with sofa, armchairs and a coffee table. Artworks hang on the walls. It’s all intended to make you feel as relaxed (almost) as you would in your own home.

This approach reflects the research that shows how familiar design elements help make shoppers feel comfortable. Colour and music choices apparently don’t make much difference, but layout and other sensory experiences do.

Familiar scents, for example, can affect your decision to go into a store, how long you stay and ultimately how much you spend. They are particularly effective when they complement the brand, such as the faint smell of wood in a hardware store or a more herbal scent in a wellness store.

You want space, but not too much

What can make or break your experience in a shop is how the staff treat you. As Sarah Alhouti and her colleagues have put it, there’s a thin line between love and hate of attention.

An overly attentive salesperson can be perceived as desperate, pushy or aggressive and drive you away. Too little attention, on the other hand, can leave you feeling ignored, unwanted and unworthy, with the same result.

With the Goldilocks zone being different for different people, retailers are turning to technology to help get the attention levels right.

For example, Australia’s largest swimwear label, Seafolly, is trying out an interactive mirror in the fitting room of its Bondi Junction store in Sydney.

The interactive mirror in Seafolly’s Bondi Junction store. Seafolly

It allows the customer to message staff directly from the changing room for assistance only if, and when, they decide they need it.

You’re so special

Shopping online is highly convenient but it doesn’t necessarily make you feel special.

Some bricks-and-mortar retailers are positioning themselves at the premium end of the shopping market by appealing to the human desire to be pampered. It makes sense to invest in the “VIP experience”, because now every customer they get is very important.

Creating the VIP experience extends from personal greetings to champagne and caviar bars.

Department store David Jones has embraced this trend as part of the A$200 million redevelopment of its Sydney premises.

Its revamped shoe floor – the largest shoe store in Australia – includes “shoe concierges” to greet and guide you and specialist shoe fitters recruited from around the world. And yes, there’s also a champagne bar.

David Jones’ new ‘Level 7’ shoe floor in Sydney. David Jones media release

Such experiences meet the desire for a “luxe” experience without the luxury price tag. Research has found that even the simple act of just being welcomed at the entrance of a store can influence how your perceive service quality as well as customer satisfaction and store loyalty.

Whether such strategies can save bricks-and-mortar stores remains to be seen.

In the meantime, champagne anyone?

Authors: The Conversation

Read more http://theconversation.com/brick-bait-three-tricks-up-retailers-sleeves-to-lure-you-back-to-physical-shops-107506