Show Me Then I’ll Believe

I’m in the process of re-writing my autobiography.  I initially wrote it back in the early nineties.  Until now it never seemed like the right time to publish it, but now I believe the time has arri...

Dr. Robert Owens - avatar Dr. Robert Owens

Five aspects of Pentecostalism that shed light on Scott Morrison's politics

Prime Minister Scott Morrison sings during a service at the Horizon Church in Sydney in April.Mick Tsikas/AAPPrime Minister Scott Morrison began his victory speech on Saturday with the words, “I...

Philip Almond, Emeritus Professor in the History of Religious Thought, The University of Queensland - avatar Philip Almond, Emeritus Professor in the History of Religious Thought, The University of Queensland

Why the 2019 election was more like 2004 than 1993 – and Labor has some reason to hope

I recently had cause to look at a large file of material I collected about Mark Latham during 2004. It is full of many of the same columnists who have just campaigned successfully for the return of th...

Frank Bongiorno, Professor of History, ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences, Australian National University - avatar Frank Bongiorno, Professor of History, ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences, Australian National University

Eastern China pinpointed as source of rogue ozone-depleting emissions

Sunset at Australia's Cape Grim observatory, one of the key global background monitoring sites for CFC-11. Paul Krummel/CSIRO, Author providedA mysterious rebound in the emissions of ozone-depleting c...

Paul Krummel, Research Group Leader, CSIRO - avatar Paul Krummel, Research Group Leader, CSIRO

Where to now for unions and 'change the rules'?

Very few people saw the Coalition’s win coming. If it was, as opposition leader Bill Shorten contended, “a referendum on wages” then it follows that Australians were content with slu...

Anthony Forsyth, Professor of Workplace Law, RMIT University - avatar Anthony Forsyth, Professor of Workplace Law, RMIT University

How we solved the mystery of Libyan desert glass

Shutterstock LinnasIn the remote desert of western Egypt, near the Libyan border, lie clues to an ancient cosmic cataclysm. Libyan desert glass is the name given to fragments of canary-yellow glass fo...

Aaron J. Cavosie, Senior research fellow, Curtin University - avatar Aaron J. Cavosie, Senior research fellow, Curtin University

Aboriginal Australians want care after brain injury. But it must consider their cultural needs

Australia's first Aboriginal Brain Injury Coordinator, Rebecca Clinch, with brain injury survivor Justin Kickett.Edith Cowan University, Author providedThis article is the fourth part in a series, Whe...

Beth Armstrong, Foundation Chair in Speech Pathology, Edith Cowan University - avatar Beth Armstrong, Foundation Chair in Speech Pathology, Edith Cowan University

Rethinking tourism so the locals actually benefit from hosting visitors

Tourism today has a problem and needs an entire rethink. Pundits are debating overtourism, peak tourism and tourismphobia. Cities such as Barcelona, Venice and Dubrovnik are witnessing a backlash agai...

Freya Higgins-Desbiolles, Senior Lecturer in Tourism Management, University of South Australia - avatar Freya Higgins-Desbiolles, Senior Lecturer in Tourism Management, University of South Australia

Wind in Albanese's sails as Chalmers weighs options

Shadow treasurer Chris Bowen has pulled out of Labor’s leadership race, increasing the pressure for an uncontested run for Anthony Albanese, which would prevent an extended limbo period for the ...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

With the LNP returned to power, is there anything left in Adani's way?

After months of “start” and “stop” Adani campaigning, the coalmine is poised to go ahead following the surprise success of the Coalition government at the federal election. So ...

Samantha Hepburn, Director of the Centre for Energy and Natural Resources Law, Deakin Law School, Deakin University - avatar Samantha Hepburn, Director of the Centre for Energy and Natural Resources Law, Deakin Law School, Deakin University

New data shows sex offenders in Victoria are going to prison for longer

There is a common perception in Victoria that courts are too lenient on offenders, but sentences for sex offences are actually increasing.ShutterstockSentences for most sex offences are getting harshe...

Paul McGorrery, PhD Candidate in Criminal Law, Deakin University - avatar Paul McGorrery, PhD Candidate in Criminal Law, Deakin University

Queensland to all those #Quexiteers: don't judge, try to understand us

Progressive voices have lit up social media with memes blaming Queensland for Labor's loss in the federal election. But characterising the state as regressive and redneck is misplaced. ...

Anne Tiernan, Professor of Politics. Dean (Engagement) Griffith Business School, Griffith University - avatar Anne Tiernan, Professor of Politics. Dean (Engagement) Griffith Business School, Griffith University

In a notoriously sexist art form, Australian women composers are making their voices heard

Performers in Speechless, a new opera by composer Cat Hope, co-commissioned by the Perth Festival and Tura New Music. The opera is a response to the Australian Human Rights Commission’s 2014 rep...

Karen Cummings, Lecturer in Singing, University of Wollongong - avatar Karen Cummings, Lecturer in Singing, University of Wollongong

Sex trafficking's tragic paradox: when victims become perpetrators

The victim-offender overlap is disturbingly common in the human trafficking trade, with women once trafficked becoming traffickers.www.shutterstock.comBorn in rural Thailand, Watcharaporn Nantahkhum ...

Alexandra Baxter, Researcher/PhD Candidate, criminology and human trafficking, Flinders University - avatar Alexandra Baxter, Researcher/PhD Candidate, criminology and human trafficking, Flinders University

If you see a group of people and hear them chanting, “Ole’s at the wheel! Tell me how good does it feel!” you have found yourself among Manchester United supporters.

Manchester United (known as Man U, or just United) is one of the world’s best-known and most successful football clubs, a dominant force in English and European football for decades.

But two months ago it was looking like a tumbling, lethargic, vulnerable giant – in sixth position in the English Premier League, way behind arch-rivals Liverpool (in first place) and Chelsea (fourth).

Since then it has climbed to fourth in the Premier League and advanced to the quarter finals of both the FA Cup and the UEFA Champions League.

The major change: the sacking of team manager Jose Mourinho and his replacement with Ole Gunnar Solskjaer.

Manchester’s Diogo Dalot, left, and Scott McTominay, right, celebrate after defeating Paris Saint-Germain on March 6 in the UEFA Champions League. Ian Langsdon/EPA

United’s turnaround has been dubbed “The Solskjaer Effect”. It defies conventional wisdom about leadership.

Mourinho, a professional coach and manager since 2000, was considered one of the best in the business. Appointed to manage United in 2016, he was expected to deliver football glory. But his tenure was mired by controversy, conflict and poor performance.

Solskjaer’s appointment as caretaker manager came as a surprise. He has had a long association with United as a player, but was unproven as a manager of a big club.

What is it about Solskjaer that has brought United’s resurgence? It’s a story of successful “identity leadership”, rallying a disengaged group of underperforming players into a cohesive and effective unit.

Our glory is more important than my glory

An effective leader advances the group’s goals over personal goals.

Solskjaer has shown he understands what he needs to do for United to win games and trophies. As the Norwegian explained in one press conference, his job “is to help the players and make them grasp the opportunity now because they all want to be part of Man United”.

Jose Mourinho, a controversial figure at Manchester United. cristiano barni/ Shutterstock.com

“I’m going to be here to help them,” he said, “to help the team.”

The team’s impressive victories have seen him already surpass several records by going undefeated in his first 11 games in charge.

He has humbly played down these achievements. When pronounced the English Premier League’s manager of the month in January, he was quick to attribute the award to the contribution of his coaching staff and players.

This is a stark contrast from his predecessor. Mourinho was often divisive and adversarial. Among Mourinho’s less endearing moments was when he reportedly stormed out of a press conference in August 2018 demanding more respect for his individual success as a coach.

Read more: Is there a way back for José Mourinho? As a sport psychologist, I see a hard road ahead

True leaders always look to deflect the attention on them as individuals. They emphasise that they represent the group. They declare their commitment to serving, as Solskjaer has done, regardless of whether he gets hired permanently.

We are stronger together

An effective leader brings people together.

Solskjaer joined United at a time of turmoil and chaos. With positivity and exuberance, he has united the team with a collective cause. “I love working with good players,” he has said. “They are good people, the players. They want to learn. They want to improve.”

After the team’s first loss under his leadership, he called it a learning experience and avoided the blame game.

Manchester United players celebrating their 2-0 win against Chelsea in the FA Cup on February 18, 2019. Silvi Photo/Shutterstock.com

By showing confidence in his players, he has empowered them to perform.

This again has been a contrast to Mourinho, who alienated players by chastising them in public.

A true leader treats every person in their team as valuable, no matter what the person’s role. Solskjaer’s collaborative approach acknowledges that everyone contributes to the success of the group.

Which is to say, the group is greater than the sum of its parts.

Group values

An effective leader respects the identity of the group.

Solskjaer played for United for almost a decade, and was integral to the club’s golden era. He then spent a few years on the coaching staff. He knows what Manchester, the city, the club and the team, are about.

The way United is supposed to play, he says, is “exciting football” – using fast-paced and attacking tactics.

Mourinho, on the other hand, attempted to stamp his own brand of defensive football on the squad – a style of play described as stodgy and unstructured. In doing so, he disregarded the club’s identity and stymied the players’ natural strengths.

Overall, Solskjaer’s behaviour demonstrates the principles of identity leadership, a model of effective leadership supported by psychological science research.

Read more: Leaders only inspire when we feel part of their group

To be a great leader you don’t have to be most successful, intelligent, or even most competent person in the room. It is about how hard you work at managing a collective sense of “we” among the people in a group and respecting the values of this group.

Full disclosure: the author is a proud Manchester United supporter.

Authors: The Conversation

Read more http://theconversation.com/its-not-about-him-leading-lessons-from-manchester-uniteds-caretaker-manager-112281