Catering For The 21st-Century Customer: Tips To Modernize Your Business

The world of business is changing at lightning speed. With customer demands and consumer habits evolving continually, modernization is key. If your business is lagging behind, and you’re keen to ensur...

News Company - avatar News Company

Treating suspected autism at 12 months of age improves children's language skills

The theory is that if therapies are started early enough, it might be possible to alter the trajectory of autism.ShutterstockTherapies given to infants before they receive a diagnosis of autism may le...

Andrew Whitehouse, Bennett Chair of Autism, Telethon Kids Institute, Univeristy of Western Australia, University of Western Australia - avatar Andrew Whitehouse, Bennett Chair of Autism, Telethon Kids Institute, Univeristy of Western Australia, University of Western Australia

Team-building exercises can be a waste of time. You achieve more by getting personal

The key to an effective team-builiding exercise is understanding a team is a social network built on connections between individuals.www.shutterstock.comSomeone we know recently told us about a team-b...

Julien Pollack, Associate Professor, University of Sydney - avatar Julien Pollack, Associate Professor, University of Sydney

Changing the Australian Constitution was always meant to be difficult – here's why

Debates about constitutional change in Australia inevitably raise the poor success rate of referendums. Only eight out of 44 attempts have ever succeeded and there has not been a successful constitut...

Anne Twomey, Professor of Constitutional Law, University of Sydney - avatar Anne Twomey, Professor of Constitutional Law, University of Sydney

Lights out! Clownfish can only hatch in the dark – which light pollution is taking away

Some 22% of the worlds' coastlines are exposed to artificial light at night. Emily Fobert, Author providedClownfish achieved worldwide fame following Finding Nemo, but it turns out these fish don&rsqu...

Emily Fobert, Research Associate, Flinders University - avatar Emily Fobert, Research Associate, Flinders University

An electronic chip that makes 'memories' is a step towards creating bionic brains

Researcher Taimur Ahmed holds the newly designed chip.Author providedWhat better way to build smarter computer chips than to mimic nature’s most perfect computer – the human brain?Being ab...

Sumeet Walia, Senior Lecturer and Vice Chancellor's Fellow, RMIT University - avatar Sumeet Walia, Senior Lecturer and Vice Chancellor's Fellow, RMIT University

As the federal government debates an Indigenous Voice, state and territories are pressing ahead

The Queensland treaty process is still in the early stages and negotiations will not begin for several years. But it's still a historic step forward for Indigenous communities.Tracey Nearmy/AAPQueensl...

Harry Hobbs, Lecturer, University of Technology Sydney - avatar Harry Hobbs, Lecturer, University of Technology Sydney

Your body as a weapon: the rise of the 'revenge body' online

A 'revenge body' is built to show someone how well you are doing without them. With the advent of social media the phenomenon is increasingly popular.ShutterstockMonths after a public breakup with her...

Mair Underwood, Lecturer in Anthropology and Sociology, The University of Queensland - avatar Mair Underwood, Lecturer in Anthropology and Sociology, The University of Queensland

Stop worrying about screen 'time'. It's your child’s screen experience that matters

Guidelines advise children under two shouldn't have any screen time, but most do anyway.Photo by Jelleke Vanooteghem on UnsplashMost (80%) Australian parents worry children spend too much time with sc...

Brittany Huber, Postdoctoral researcher, Swinburne University of Technology - avatar Brittany Huber, Postdoctoral researcher, Swinburne University of Technology

Finally, the NDIS will fund sex therapy. But it should cover sex workers too

Whether sex therapy should be a funded disability support has been controversial since the NDIS was rolled out.From shutterstock.comThe Administrative Appeals Tribunal recently granted a woman with mu...

Matthew Yau, Adjunct professor, College of Healthcare Sciences, James Cook University - avatar Matthew Yau, Adjunct professor, College of Healthcare Sciences, James Cook University

Politics with Michelle Grattan: Megan Davis on a First Nations Voice in the Constitution

Last week on this podcast we talked to Ken Wyatt about the government’s plan for a referendum – hopefully this parliamentary term – to recognise Indigenous Australians in the Constit...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

Team-building exercises can be a waste of time. You achieve more by getting personal

The key to an effective team-builiding exercise is understanding a team is a social network built on connections between individuals.www.shutterstock.comSomeone we know recently told us about a team-b...

The Conversation - avatar The Conversation

Americans focus on responding to earthquake damage, not preventing it, because they're unaware of their risk

Heavily built-up areas can experience more disastrous damage in an earthquake.AP Photo/Marcio Jose SanchezOn July 4 and 5, two major earthquakes, followed by several thousand smaller ones, struck Sout...

Matt Motta, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Oklahoma State University - avatar Matt Motta, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Oklahoma State University

Did we mishear Neil Armstrong's famous first words on the Moon?

It's the case of the missing 'a.'Nick Lehr/The Conversation via NASA, CC BY-SAOn July 20, 1969, an estimated 650 million people watched in suspense as Neil Armstrong descended a ladder towards the sur...

Melissa Michaud Baese-Berk, Associate Professor of Linguistics, University of Oregon - avatar Melissa Michaud Baese-Berk, Associate Professor of Linguistics, University of Oregon

We are in the midst of an outpouring of feminist activism kicked off by the pink pussy hat movement in the United States and propelled by #MeToo, which has spread to Australia where a range of luminaries have been named as harassers.

And yet we are also in the midst of a backlash, a concern that gender equality has moved too fast, aided by “gender fatigue”.

Twenty-seven years ago, Susan Faludi created a furore by documenting what she said was a backlash against women. She said it wasn’t new, as evidenced by penalties imposed on childless and unwed women in ancient Rome, and witch burnings of medieval Europe. Each was a response to perceptions that women were gaining ground.

This time it is taking the form of a resurgence of the men’s rights movement, and also in the cries of #notallmen. It is evident in the trolling occurring on feminist websites, negative comments in the media and the rape, violence and death threats inflicted on feminist activists.

That’s in social media and society. What about the workplace?

Backlash in the form of fatigue

It can be as simple as organisational silence and inaction. Even in organisations where managers and workers are committed to the idea of equality, it can take the form of resistance to specific initiatives.

It is aligned to gender fatigue, or seeing further advances in gender equality as a “non-issue”.

My colleagues (Associate Professor Linda Colley, Dr Meraiah Foley and Professor Rae Cooper) and I have examined managers’ and employees’ understanding of gender equality and have often been told “gender is not an issue here”.

It is as if they are tired of hearing about it and want it to be “done”.

While we have found many organisations which are well advanced in their gender equity journey, we have yet to find one in which it is actually done.

What’s worth aiming for

Sometimes women are told that the remaining gender inequality is their own fault. #Metoo has been blamed for men being afraid to mentor women. Women are told to “lean in” – to focus on empowering individuals rather than women in general.

British researchers Hazel Conley and Margaret Page say real change will only be achieved when there is

an understanding of gendered power and its intersections with other forms of inequality, individual commitment to act on this knowledge and the collective organisation to approach gender equality.

That understanding might lead to non-hierarchical organisational structures with different concepts of power. It might subvert the concept of work so that it is no longer regarded as the guiding force of lives. It might mean working to live, not living to work. It might mean that there isn’t paid work and other work, just “work”.

It might make future backlash unnecessary, and gender fatigue redundant.

This article is an edited version a recent address given by Sue Williamson as president of the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand.

Authors: The Conversation

Read more http://theconversation.com/backlash-and-gender-fatigue-why-progress-on-gender-equality-has-slowed-112706