6 things no one tells you before you join a gym

Joining a gym and getting in shape might seem simple enough, but for some it can be a daunting process. Whether it’s being unsure of how to use equipment or feeling intimidated by muscle men, there’...

News Company - avatar News Company

Why home pet sitting is best when you go on holiday

Pets are part of the family, and you can’t just get up and go on your holiday without planning suitable arrangements for their care. Pets are bonded to their owners and their environment, and many f...

News Company - avatar News Company

What colors can I get my bollards in?

Apart from directing traffic, protecting commercial buildings and private parking areas, bollards are also used to improve the exterior aesthetics of a building. That is why you can get them in a va...

News Company - avatar News Company

Three Easy Home Office Updates to Boost Your Productivity

If you freelance or run your own business from home, you know it’s not always easy to stay motivated away from the hubbub of an office environment. Working from home means it’s up to you to create a ‘...

News Company - avatar News Company

Surefire Ways To Topple Your Construction Company's Reputation

It's an excellent time to be in the construction business. According to reports online, the U.S. construction market is booming, with a greater demand for qualified professionals to enter the indus...

News Company - avatar News Company

Budj Bim's world heritage listing is an Australian first – what other Indigenous cultural sites could be next?

Ranger Trevor Bramwell on the walk up to the Split Rock art galleries in Cape York's Quinkan Country in 2017. Rebekah Ison/AAPThe Budj Bim Cultural Landscape in south-west Victoria is the first Indige...

Claire Smith, Professor of Archaeology, College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, Flinders University - avatar Claire Smith, Professor of Archaeology, College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, Flinders University

Dependent and vulnerable: the experiences of academics on casual and insecure contracts

Academics in precarious employment struggle to feel a strong sense of self.Nathan Dumlao/UnsplashA majority of academic staff at some of Australia’s top universities work in casual or fixed-term...

Kate Bone, Lecturer, Massey University - avatar Kate Bone, Lecturer, Massey University

When an artist looks at a chemical element, what do they see?

Artists Damon Kowarsky and Hyunju Kim produced a series of 51 artistic interpretations of elements from the Periodic Table. Artistic depictions of several chemical elements feature in a new exhibitio...

Mark Blaskovich, Senior Research Officer, The University of Queensland - avatar Mark Blaskovich, Senior Research Officer, The University of Queensland

First-ever Australian study shows how yoga can improve the lives of prisoners

The participants in the eight-week yoga trial program in Canberra's Alexander Maconochie Centre prison. Author providedIn 2017, a small group of male prisoners participated in an eight-week yoga pro...

Anthony Hopkins, Senior Lecturer, Australian National University - avatar Anthony Hopkins, Senior Lecturer, Australian National University

Taller, faster, better, stronger: wind towers are only getting bigger

Wind towers are getting taller. ShutterstockFormer Australian Greens leader Bob Brown made headlines this week after he objected to a proposed wind farm on Tasmania’s Robbins Island. The develop...

Con Doolan, Professor, School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, UNSW - avatar Con Doolan, Professor, School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, UNSW

Air travel spreads infections globally, but health advice from inflight magazines can limit that

Our research showed that inflight magazines offered travellers health advice on everything from dehydration to swollen ankles, but hardly anything on avoiding catching and spreading infectious disease...

Ramon Zenel Shaban, Clinical Chair and Professor of Infection Prevention and Disease Control at the University of Sydney, University of Sydney - avatar Ramon Zenel Shaban, Clinical Chair and Professor of Infection Prevention and Disease Control at the University of Sydney, University of Sydney

A black, female 007? As a lifelong James Bond fan, I say bring it on

Actress Lashana Lynch, pictured here in Captain Marvel, is rumoured to be playing 007 in the next Bond film. The films, which have consistently relied on misogynistic tropes, are in need of an update...

Darren Paul Fisher, Head of Directing, Department of Film, Screen and Creative Media, Bond University - avatar Darren Paul Fisher, Head of Directing, Department of Film, Screen and Creative Media, Bond University

Adani has set a dangerous precedent in requesting scientists' names

The Galilee waterhole is part of the area potentially affected by Adani's Carmichael mine.Stop Adani, CC BY-SAA freedom of information request has revealed Adani sought the names of CSIRO and Geoscien...

Samantha Hepburn, Director of the Centre for Energy and Natural Resources Law, Deakin Law School, Deakin University - avatar Samantha Hepburn, Director of the Centre for Energy and Natural Resources Law, Deakin Law School, Deakin University

'How do I increase my libido?'

It's perfectly normal for your libido to fluctuate.Wes Mountain, CC BY-SAI Need to Know is an ongoing series for teens in search of reliable, confidential advice about life’s tricky questions. I...

Melissa Kang, Associate professor, University of Technology Sydney - avatar Melissa Kang, Associate professor, University of Technology Sydney

The April 2 budget will provide about A$600 million to pursue wrongdoers and help restore trust in Australia’s financial system.

The budget, which will be a launching pad for the election, likely to be announced the following weekend, is set to include another round of tax cuts but it will also contain strong warnings about a deterioration in Australia’s economic outlook.

“The near term economic outlook is looking softer since [the December budget update], with the economy facing some emerging risks,” Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said in an interview with The Conversation.

“We are concerned about the impact of [falling] housing prices spilling over into the real economy through lower household consumption and building approvals – and this matters because household consumption is close to 60% of GDP”.

The international outlook had been deteriorating, with growth figures revised down, he said.

Frydenberg said the budget’s measures were “focussed on driving down the cost of living , driving productivity and growth and creating more jobs”. It will forecast a long-awaited return to surplus and its spending will be “very targeted”.

Read more: No surplus, no share market growth, no lift in wage growth. Economic survey points to bleaker times post-election

Following the Hayne royal commission’s indictment of the banks and other financial institutions, the government will give the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) more than $400 million in additional funding over four years to 2022-23. On average, this is a rise of about a quarter in its annual funding over the forward estimates compared to 2017-18.

The Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA) will receive $150 million extra – an increase of about 30% in its annual funding over the budget period, compared with 2017-18.

Taxpayers, however, will eventually get back the funds provided to ASIC and APRA – the financial industry will be levied for the cost, with the largest institutions paying the most.

Also, the government will provide more than $35 million to support the expansion of the federal court’s jurisdiction to include corporate crime. The expansion will include the appointment of two new judges, the engagement of 11 registry and support staff, and the building of new facilities.

The court’s new role will mean institutions and individuals breaking the corporate law can be prosecuted faster than under the current system.

The government says the ASIC funding will support expanded regulation of financial services and “a new, more hardline, proactive and accelerated enforcement strategy including implementing a ‘why not litigate?’ approach”. There will be greater on-site supervision of larger institutions.

Read more: Grattan on Friday: Josh Frydenberg has a great job at the worst time

The APRA funding will support, among other initiatives, its response to areas of concern highlighted by the commission, including governance, remuneration, and culture in financial institutions.

As the government beds down a budget crucial to its efforts to revive its electoral fortunes, Frydenberg said it would help “frame” the election contest.

“It will be about what kind of nation Australians want over the next decade. On our side it’s about balancing the books, growing the economy with more jobs and lower taxes, guaranteeing essential services, hospitals, roads and schools, all without increasing taxes,” he said

“There’s been a bit of a debate over real wages and the key to real wages is not high taxes - it’s through decreasing taxes and targeted spending on infrastructure and more trade and getting people into work,” Frydenberg said.

He said the Australian economy’s fundamentals were sound. Growth, at 2.3% per cent through the year, was second only to the United States among G7 countries. This week’s figures showed unemployment falling to 4.9%, the lowest in eight years. Youth unemployment was the lowest in seven years.

Read more: Ultra low wage growth isn't accidental. It is the intended outcome of government policies

But there was a slowdown in the global economy, with global trade volumes down more than 3% since August. Trade tensions continued and there was uncertainty over Brexit. The International Monetary Fund and the OECD had downgraded their 2019 growth numbers.

“Japan is only growing at around 1% and had a negative quarter last year. The Euro area has been growing at less than 2% and had a negative quarter last year. Germany had a negative quarter last year and China itself set a lower growth target,‘ he said.

At home, "falls in dwelling investment detracted 0.2% from growth in the December quarter. The impacts of the drought have seen farm GDP down by 5.8 % through the year and the impacts of the flood have still yet to fully flow through.”

Frydenberg said the situation was “all manageable - but only with a strong economic plan that gives business confidence to invest and consumers the confidence to spend. It requires a pro-growth agenda, which is exactly what you’ll see in this year’s budget”.

The budget numbers are being held up by strong growth in nominal GDP, which determines revenue numbers.

Frydenberg said returning the budget to surplus was “more significant than just a number because it’s actually showing that we’ve turned a corner.”

“Surpluses will continue to grow over the medium term, and the goal is to bring net debt down to zero.”

Frydenberg stressed the government’s commitment was for a surplus in 2019-20, declining to rule in or out a surplus for the current financial year. He pointed out there had been “issues’ in this financial year, especially the drought and other natural disasters, but also higher schools payments and various other commitments the government had made.

Authors: The Conversation

Read more http://theconversation.com/funding-boost-for-policing-finance-sector-in-budget-that-warns-of-economic-softening-114093