Organs 'too risky' to donate may be safer than we think. We crunched the numbers and here's what we found

Accepting a donor kidney with a small risk of carrying HIV or hepatitis B or C might be worth thinking about.from www.shutterstock.comOrgans from potential donors once rejected as being unsafe to tran...

Karen Waller, PhD candidate, University of Sydney - avatar Karen Waller, PhD candidate, University of Sydney

Asylum seekers have a right to higher education and academics can be powerful advocates

Australia’s refugee policy has led to a two-track education system. Those processed offshore, and deemed refugees by the time they have arrived in Australia, are entitled to fee support for univ...

Merrilyn Delporte, PhD Candidate, Queensland University of Technology - avatar Merrilyn Delporte, PhD Candidate, Queensland University of Technology

Lesson for Australia. Make it hard for people to get benefits, and they'll stop, but they mightn't get jobs

Australia, like the United States, makes it hard for people who get benefits to stay on them. It’s not simply a matter of withdrawing benefits as people get jobs and work more hours – some...

David C. Ribar, Professorial Research Fellow, University of Melbourne - avatar David C. Ribar, Professorial Research Fellow, University of Melbourne

No god but God: a breathtaking exhibition bringing Islamic art out of the shadows

The biggest ever display of Islamic art at the Art Gallery of South Australia holds breathtaking masterpieces, and important lessons for all. Art Gallery of South Australia/Saul SteedIn 2005, the Art ...

Ana Silkatcheva, Doctoral Candidate (Oriental Studies - Islamic Art and Archaeology), University of Oxford; Curatorial Researcher, Nicholson Collection, Chau Chak Wing Museum, University of Sydney - avatar Ana Silkatcheva, Doctoral Candidate (Oriental Studies - Islamic Art and Archaeology), University of Oxford; Curatorial Researcher, Nicholson Collection, Chau Chak Wing Museum, University of Sydney

Labor announces inquiry by former attorney-general Lavarch into scandal-ridden NSW head office

The ALP has announced an inquiry into the head office of the NSW ALP, after weeks of shocking revelations at the Independent Commission against Corruption about scandals in the handling of donations.T...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

VIDEO: Michelle Grattan on the Extinction Rebellion protests - and Australia's responsibility at the Turkish-Syrian border

University of Canberra Vice-Chancellor Professor Deep Saini and Michelle Grattan discuss the acts of civil disobedience by climate activist group Extinction Rebellion - including the harsh bail condit...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

Cattle prods and welfare cuts: mounting threats to Extinction Rebellion show demands are being heard, but ignored

Scores of arrests have been made across Australia as the Extinction Rebellion enters its fifth day of protests. The activists are desperately trying to force the Australian government to take serious ...

Piero Moraro, Lecturer in Criminal Justice, Charles Sturt University - avatar Piero Moraro, Lecturer in Criminal Justice, Charles Sturt University

Can Eliud Kipchoge run a sub-2hr marathon? It all comes down to 15 extraordinary seconds

UPDATE: Eliud Kipchoge successfully broke the 2-hour marathon barrier in Vienna on October 12, 2019, posting a time of 1h 59m 40s. However, it will not be recognised as an official world record, due t...

Simon D Angus, Associate Professor, Monash University - avatar Simon D Angus, Associate Professor, Monash University

We thought Australian cars were using less fuel. New research shows we were wrong

Traffic congestion on the M5 motorway in Sydney. Government assumptions that Australian cars are becoming more fuel efficient are incorrect, research shows.Dean Lewins/AAPIn several speeches of late, ...

John Quiggin, Professor, School of Economics, The University of Queensland - avatar John Quiggin, Professor, School of Economics, The University of Queensland

Tropic of Shakespeare: what studying Macbeth in Queensland could teach us about place and shipwrecks

Macbeth's Scottish heaths may seem a long way from tropical Queensland, but there are points of connection.Unsplash/Matt Riches, FALWhen you imagine the setting for Macbeth, misty heaths, battlefields...

Claire Hansen, Lecture in English/Writing, James Cook University - avatar Claire Hansen, Lecture in English/Writing, James Cook University

Bees can learn higher numbers than we thought – if we train them the right way

Honeybees: nature's maths whizzes.SR Howard, Author providedBees are pretty good at maths – as far as insects go, at least. We already know, for example, that they can count up to four and even ...

Adrian Dyer, Associate Professor, RMIT University - avatar Adrian Dyer, Associate Professor, RMIT University

As Turkish troops move in to Syria, the risks are great – including for Turkey itself

Turkish armoured vehicles drive down a road during a military operation in Kurdish areas of northern Syria.AAP/EPA/STRTurkey did not waste much time in launching an attack on Syrian soil just days aft...

Mehmet Ozalp, Associate Professor in Islamic Studies, Director of The Centre for Islamic Studies and Civilisation and Executive Member of Public and Contextual Theology, Charles Sturt University - avatar Mehmet Ozalp, Associate Professor in Islamic Studies, Director of The Centre for Islamic Studies and Civilisation and Executive Member of Public and Contextual Theology, Charles Sturt University

Endometriosis costs women and society $30,000 a year for every sufferer

It can be difficult to get pain from endometriosis under control.ShutterstockThe average cost for a woman with endometriosis both personally and for society is around A$30,000 a year, according to our...

Mike Armour, Post-doctoral research fellow, Western Sydney University - avatar Mike Armour, Post-doctoral research fellow, Western Sydney University

Points for tries? The Rugby World Cup shows how bonus schemes can come unstuck

If you want to know how bonus schemes can come unstuck, take a look at the Rugby World CupIt’s inching its way towards the end of the group stage in Japan, where Australia takes on Georgia tonig...

Liam Lenten, Senior Lecturer, Department of Economics and Finance, La Trobe University - avatar Liam Lenten, Senior Lecturer, Department of Economics and Finance, La Trobe University

The Morrison government will finish the first week of the new parliament with its election centrepiece - the $158 billion, three-stage tax package – passed into law.

The first stage of the tax relief – in the form of an offset for low- and middle-income earners when people submit their returns - will be available as soon as the Tax Office makes the necessary arrangements over the next few days. Getting the legislation through this week means there is only minimal slippage from the July 1 start date that was promised in the budget.

The numbers fell into place with Tasmanian crossbench senator Jacqui Lambie declaring she would vote for the package. She had negotiated with the government on her demand that it forgive the $157 million social housing debt her state owes the Commonwealth. This would save Tasmania $15 million a year, which Lambie wants used to deal with issues of homelessness and social housing.

Lambie said: “The good will is there and they know that we’ve got housing problems down there.”

Read more: View from The Hill: Jacqui Lambie plays the Harradine game

While Finance Minister Mathias Cormann, who had said there would be no horse-trading over the package, was publicly coy about the deal, Lambie is confident it will be delivered.

She said some details still had to be sorted out.

What I don’t want to be doing is rushing out saying here’s the money and that’s it. We want to make sure that that money is targeted […] we’re still dealing on good faith. And I look very forward to that over the next four to six weeks.

Cormann told Sky News: “Senator Lambie has been a very forceful advocate.

She has raised issues with us. We are very happy to work through these issues with her. When we are in a position to make further announcements down the track we will.

Read more: Stages 1 and 2 of the tax cuts should pass. But Stage 3 would return us to the 1950s

The other crossbench votes needed for the package come from independent Cory Bernardi and the two Centre Alliance senators.

Centre Alliance extracted a deal over action on gas prices.

It said in a Thursday statement that it had "worked with the government on both short- and long-term reforms to deal with gas market concerns.”

The government would announce the full package in coming weeks, it said.

It would include

changes to the Australian Domestic Gas Security Mechanism (ADGSM) to deal with current pricing, market transparency measures, measures to deal with the monopoly nature of East Coast gas pipelines and longer term measures to ensure future gas projects deliver surplus supply to the Australian market.

The gas agreement, canvassed publicly in recent days, has caused some blow-back from the industry.

Faced with the inevitability of the tax package passing, Labor said it would continue to pursue its attempt to split the package and then consider its options.

It is likely not to oppose in the final vote.

Read more: Lambie's vote key if government wants to have medevac repealed

Eyes are now on Lambie’s position on the government’s bid to repeal the medevac act. Home Affairs minister Peter Dutton on Thursday introduced legislation for the repeal. Lambie said she was still making up her mind on how she will vote when the legislation arrives in the Senate. She is set to be the crucial vote.

Authors: The Conversation

Read more http://theconversation.com/morrisons-158-billion-tax-plan-set-to-sail-through-senate-after-deals-with-crossbenchers-119873