Business etiquettes that can leave a lasting impression

The first impression is the most correct, especially if it is negative. This article will focus on business etiquette, on how to make the first and subsequent impressions of company representatives ...

News Company - avatar News Company

'Slow-minded and bewildered': Donald Trump builds barriers to peace and prosperity

The US president “had no plan, no scheme, no constructive ideas whatever”, according to one of the world’s most influential economists. He was “in many respects, perhaps inevit...

John Hawkins, Assistant Professor, School of Politics, Economics and Society, University of Canberra - avatar John Hawkins, Assistant Professor, School of Politics, Economics and Society, University of Canberra

What we learn from a fish that can change sex in just 10 days

The male bluehead wrasse defends his group of yellow females, one of whom has to step-up and take charge if he leaves.Kevin Bryant, Author providedThe bluehead wrasse is a fish that lives in small soc...

Jenny Graves, Distinguished Professor of Genetics, La Trobe University - avatar Jenny Graves, Distinguished Professor of Genetics, La Trobe University

Family Values review: David Williamson's new uncomfortable, confronting play

The newest play from Australia's most prolific playwright sees David Williamson in vintage form.Brett Boardman/Griffin Theatre CompanyReview: Family Values, directed by Lee Lewis, Griffin Theatre Comp...

Ian Maxwell, Associate Professor in Performance Studies, University of Sydney - avatar Ian Maxwell, Associate Professor in Performance Studies, University of Sydney

White, male and straight – how 30 years of Australia Day speeches leave most Australians out

Scott Morrison emphasised national unity in his Australia Day address last year, but this is not the message that everyone wants to hear.FacebookLast year on Australia Day, Prime Minister Scott Morris...

Nicholas Bromfield, Lecturer, University of Sydney - avatar Nicholas Bromfield, Lecturer, University of Sydney

Out of control, contained, safe? Here's what each bushfire status actually means

We're used to images of firefighters with hoses, but more of the firefighting effort goes to clearing vegetation than spraying with water. Dean Lewins/AAPIn this record-breaking bushfire season, notif...

Thomas Duff, Postdoctoral Fellow, Forest and Ecosystem Science, University of Melbourne - avatar Thomas Duff, Postdoctoral Fellow, Forest and Ecosystem Science, University of Melbourne

If it's below 40 degrees in South Florida, the forecast calls for falling iguanas

Beware cold-stunned 'chicken of the trees.'AP Photo/Wilfredo LeeAs temperatures were dipping this week, the National Weather Service issued freeze warnings for much of Florida and Georgia, adding a wa...

Frank Mazzotti, Professor, University of Florida - avatar Frank Mazzotti, Professor, University of Florida

5 obstacles that stop many students from taking an internship

College students face more obstacles to getting an internship. Transportation and having to work a paying job are among the barriers.Picnoi, CC BY-SAWhen her college started requiring students to comp...

Matthew T. Hora, Assistant Professor of Adult & Higher Education, Director of the Center for Research on College-Workforce Transitions, University of Wisconsin-Madison - avatar Matthew T. Hora, Assistant Professor of Adult & Higher Education, Director of the Center for Research on College-Workforce Transitions, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Why your zodiac sign is probably wrong

As the Earth orbits the Sun, the Sun appears to move through the ancient constellations of the zodiac.Tauʻolunga/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SAI was born a Capricorn (please don’t judge me), b...

James Kaler, Professor Emeritus of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - avatar James Kaler, Professor Emeritus of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

In the terrorism fight, Trump has continued a key Obama policy

U.S. special operations troops are a crucial element of the fight against terrorism.AP Photo/Wally SantanaPresident Donald Trump has rescinded, reversed or otherwise ended many of former President Bar...

Boaz Dvir, Assistant Professor in Journalism, Pennsylvania State University - avatar Boaz Dvir, Assistant Professor in Journalism, Pennsylvania State University

Winning worker hearts and minds is key to companies achieving their green goals

Every employee needs to embrace a company's sustainability mission if it hopes to succeed. pcruciatti/Shutterstock.comA lot of companies say they care about the environment and commit to certain goals...

CB Bhattacharya, Professor of Sustainability and Ethics, University of Pittsburgh - avatar CB Bhattacharya, Professor of Sustainability and Ethics, University of Pittsburgh

Are you in danger of catching the coronavirus? 5 questions answered

A worker in Wuhan, China removes biomedical waste from the Wuhan Medical Treatment Center, where many patients of the coronavirus have been treated, on Jan. 22, 2020.Dake Kang/AP PhotoEditor’s n...

William Petri, Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia - avatar William Petri, Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia

The serious consequence of exercising too much, too fast

Exercising too much, too hard can lead not only to burnout but sometimes to a serious condition that can harm the kidneys.Thayut Sutheeravut/Shutterstock.comEvery 365.25 days, when the Earth complete...

Tamara Hew-Butler, Associate Professor of Exercise and Sports Science, Wayne State University - avatar Tamara Hew-Butler, Associate Professor of Exercise and Sports Science, Wayne State University

200 years of exploring Antarctica – the world's coldest, most forbidding and most peaceful continent

Aerial view of a glacier in the Antarctic peninsula region.Getty Images/Mario TamaAntarctica is the remotest part of the world, but it is a hub of scientific discovery, international diplomacy and env...

Dan Morgan, Associate Dean and Principal Senior Lecturer in Earth and Environmental Sciences, Vanderbilt University - avatar Dan Morgan, Associate Dean and Principal Senior Lecturer in Earth and Environmental Sciences, Vanderbilt University

In several speeches of late, Prime Minister Scott Morrison insisted with a straight face that Australia is doing its bit on climate change. The claim was swiftly and thoroughly debunked. The truth is that the Morrison government is piggybacking on the efforts of others, to varying degrees of success.

We saw it in electricity generation, where the federal government has rejected a string of schemes to reduce emissions. Nonetheless the electricity sector is getting cleaner as ageing coal-fired power stations are replaced by renewables. This outcome owes nothing to federal government action. It reflects state government policies and the residual effects of the previous Labor government’s Renewable Energy Target, and public pressure that forced banks and insurance companies to stop supporting fossil fuels.

In the transport sector, after decades of inaction, the government rejected recommendations from the Climate Change Authority to impose fuel efficiency standards on passenger vehicles, leaving Australia as the only OECD country without such standards. It has similarly derided action to promote the use of electric vehicles.

Read more: Australians could have saved over $1 billion in fuel if car emissions standards were introduced 3 years ago

Instead, the Coalition is relying on the hope that carbon dioxide emission rates of Australia’s new passenger vehicle fleet will reduce over time without any effort by governments, because vehicle emissions legislation overseas, where Australia’s cars are made, is delivering technological improvements. Official projections state that some, but not all, of this improvement will flow through to Australia.

Unfortunately, this assumption is not reliable. New research shows that for the first time, fuel efficiency in Australia is getting worse, not better. In the absence of positive action from governments, transport emissions will continue to grow, and even accelerate.

Department of Environment and Energy, CC BY A nation of car lovers, and carbon belchers Total road travel in Australia rose from 181 billion km in 2000 to 255 billion km in 2018 - a 41% increase. Total CO₂ emissions from road transport increased by 31% between 2000 and 2017, rising from 16% of total emissions in 2000 to 22% in 2017. With no action, transport emissions are projected to reach 111 million tonnes of CO₂ by 2030. Emissions have grown more slowly than kilometres travelled, which suggests that improvements in fuel efficiency have partially mitigated the effect of increased travel. Reducing emissions from transport will require a stronger decline in emissions intensity (CO₂ emissions per kilometre travelled) from our vehicles. Under current policies, this will not happen. Our assumptions are all wrong A recent analysis by Transport Energy/Emission Research (TER) found the actual emissions intensity of new Australian passenger vehicles has stabilised and likely increased in recent years. This finding directly contradicts projections that emissions intensity will fall without government intervention. The chart below shows the average fleet emission rates officially reported in Europe, the US and Japan, and based on laboratory tests. When compared to these jurisdictions, Australia’s new passenger vehicles have significantly higher average CO₂ emission rates, and thus fuel consumption, than other countries, but all show a decline. Official new private vehicle fleet average CO₂ emission rates 2000-17 Real-World CO2 Emissions Performance of the Australian New Passenger Vehicle Fleet 2008-2018, TER Unfortunately, real-world emissions and fuel consumption deviate substantially – and increasingly – from laboratory tests that are used to produce the officially reported CO₂ figures. This discrepancy is often referred to as “the gap”. So in reality, the reduction in CO₂ emission rates is not as large as official laboratory results suggest. There are multiple reasons for this gap, such as the laboratory test protocol itself, and strategies used by car manufacturers -and allowed by the test - to achieve lower emissions in laboratory conditions. TER corrected the official Australian figures to reflect real world emissions. It found that carbon emission intensity stopped declining around 2014 and is now increasing. This suggests that, for the first time, fuel efficiency is no longer improving and is actually getting worse. Official vs real-world CO₂ emission rates for Australia’s new private vehicle fleet Real-World CO2 Emissions Performance of the Australian New Passenger Vehicle Fleet 2008-2018, TER The upshot is that total CO₂ emissions from road transport are increasing, and will accelerate in the future. The TER study identified the likely reasons for this: increased sales of heavy vehicles, such as four-wheel drives, and diesel cars. The latter may have a reputation for fuel efficiency, but they still emit, on average, about 10% more CO₂ than petrol cars. Australian diesel cars are, on average, about 40% heavier than petrol cars, and have 15% higher engine capacity. The road ahead The worsening picture in road transport emissions will increasingly drag down Australia’s efforts to meet its modest climate goals set in Paris - even with the accounting tricks the government plans to deploy to reduce the task. Of course it also means Australia is far less likely to make the much sharper emissions reductions needed by all nations to stabilise the global climate. What can be done about this? The most obvious first step is to implement mandatory fuel efficiency or vehicle emission standards. This policy, fundamental in other countries, would significantly lower weekly fuel costs for vehicle owners. The federal government must adjust policy settings to encourage the uptake of electric vehicles. AAP Read more: Clean, green machines: the truth about electric vehicle emissions Second, a rapid shift to electric cars will help, and increasingly so as the electricity supply transitions to renewables. Deep emission cuts are then possible. The third is to provide better information about actual emissions. This could be achieved by restoring the large testing programs conducted in Australia up to 2008, involving hundreds of Australian vehicles over different real-world Australian test cycles which generated large databases of raw measurements. For the moment, Australia’s national greenhouse gas emissions strategy seems to be: do nothing, rely on the work of industry, state governments and other nations, and hope that nobody notices. But climate change is not going away. Dodging it now will only increase the costs we accumulate in the long run.

Authors: The Conversation

Read more http://theconversation.com/we-thought-australian-cars-were-using-less-fuel-new-research-shows-we-were-wrong-122378