Conservative landslide at UK's Brexit election; Trump's ratings rise on strong US economy

Led by Boris Johnson, the Conservatives won 56% of the vote and will have an 80-seat majority.AAP/EPA/ VIckie FloresAt the December 12 UK election, the Conservatives won 365 of the 650 House of Common...

Adrian Beaumont, Honorary Associate, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne - avatar Adrian Beaumont, Honorary Associate, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne

Why Reduce Meat Consumption Saves The Planet

The climate crisis does not show signs of improving and the world is still struggling to get to grips with the carbon emissions targets that have been agreed. One of the major changes in focus in re...

News Company - avatar News Company

Johnson's thumping win an electoral lesson in not just having policies, but knowing how to sell them

With Johnson's crushing win, Brexit will now happen. But this may also be the start of the break-up of the UK. AAP/EPA/Vickie FloresSo for all the talk of narrowing polls, tactical voting, and possibl...

Simon Tormey, Professor of Politics, University of Bristol - avatar Simon Tormey, Professor of Politics, University of Bristol

Has Health & Safety Gone Too Far?

No matter where you work you will have heard of the health and safety rules of the building, you will have even heard of training that you will need to undertake, and if you ever have to lift the box ...

News Company - avatar News Company

Why Congress would keep working during a government shutdown

Congress holds the power to propose and approve the federal budget.Patsy Lynch/ MediaPunch /IPXUnless Congress passes new spending legislation by December 20, at least some federal agencies may need t...

Zachary Price, Associate Professor of Law, University of California, Hastings - avatar Zachary Price, Associate Professor of Law, University of California, Hastings

US-China trade deal: 3 fundamental issues remain unresolved

The game is far from over.rawf8/Shutterstock.comThe U.S. and China have reportedly reached a so-called phase one deal in their ongoing trade war. While few details have been disclosed, the agreement p...

Penelope B. Prime, Clinical Professor of International Business, Georgia State University - avatar Penelope B. Prime, Clinical Professor of International Business, Georgia State University

View from The Hill: Morrison won't have a bar of public service intrusions on government's power

Scott Morrison has rejected or sidelined a number of recommendations from the long-awaited Thodey review.AAP/Paul BravenScott Morrison has rejected or sidelined a number of recommendations from the lo...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

VIDEO: Michelle Grattan reflects on the year in politics

For their last video for the year, University of Canberra Vice-Chancellor Deep Saini and Michelle Grattan look backwards to the big issues which have shaped political discourse. They discuss the surpr...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

God as man, man as God: no wonder many Christian men today are having a masculinity crisis

How men saw God shaped how they saw themselves, and in turn, how they saw women. WikimediaThis article is part of our Gender and Christianity series.To understand contemporary Christian ideas about ge...

William Loader, Emeritus Professor of New Testament at Murdoch University, Murdoch University - avatar William Loader, Emeritus Professor of New Testament at Murdoch University, Murdoch University

Australia needs a national crisis plan, and not just for bushfires

Bushfires aren't the only catastrophic emergency Australia is likely to see. AAP Image/Mick TsikasCalls are growing for a national bushfire plan, including from former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull...

Andrew Gissing, General Manager, Risk Frontiers, Adjunct Fellow, Macquarie University - avatar Andrew Gissing, General Manager, Risk Frontiers, Adjunct Fellow, Macquarie University

In impeachment spotlight, dueling views of professionalism appear

To some, White House aide Jennifer Williams and Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman are impartial truth-tellers; to others, they are power-hungry bureaucrats.AP Photo/Andrew HarnikImpeachment hearings have thr...

Michael J. Brown, Assistant Professor of History, Rochester Institute of Technology - avatar Michael J. Brown, Assistant Professor of History, Rochester Institute of Technology

Impeachment is better than exile

President Donald Trump waves as he boards Air Force One, June 6, 2019.AP/Alex BrandonWhen the framers of the Constitution created the process for Congress to impeach “all civil officers of the U...

Peter C. Mancall, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities, University of Southern California – Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences - avatar Peter C. Mancall, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities, University of Southern California – Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

Kids aren't getting enough exercise, even in sporty Seattle

There are many ways for children and teens to stay active.Margie Nicosia/Pocock Rowing Foundation, CC BY-SAPeople who live in and around Seattle are among the nation’s most active. The region is...

Julie McCleery, Research Associate & Lecturer, Center for Leadership in Athletics, University of Washington - avatar Julie McCleery, Research Associate & Lecturer, Center for Leadership in Athletics, University of Washington

Memo from a historian: White ladies cooking in plantation museums are a denial of history

Jermone Bias and Cheyney McKnight portraying enslaved cooks at Belle Grove Plantation in Middletown, Virginia, a National Park Service property.National Park ServiceFall is almost gone and winter is c...

Kelley Fanto Deetz, Lecturer in American Studies, University of Virginia - avatar Kelley Fanto Deetz, Lecturer in American Studies, University of Virginia

Anthony Albanese has promised to open a “conversation” about new ways of protecting workers in insecure employment, and committed to a root and branch overhaul of the “broken” vocational education system.

In his speech on jobs and the future of work, delivered in Perth on Tuesday, Albanese declared today’s new employment arrangements – such as the gig economy - were straining the present industrial relations system.

With job insecurity on the rise and widespread casual employment, many people had unpredictable income and hours and few protections. They were unable to plan ahead, including financially.

“These Australians deserve a greater sense of security”, he said.

While one option was to look at the barriers to businesses offering full-time jobs, for many employers and workers non-standard arrangements suited.

“Today we have close to 1.5 million secondary jobs, some with a median income of up to $9500 depending on the industry,” he said. Some 40% of Uber drivers had a separate full-time job, or a business. For many of them Uber driving gave flexibility.

“It is time to have a conversation about new forms of worker protections, which can be made as flexible as the gig economy jobs they could cover, as well as benefit more traditional industries,” Albanese said

He floated the idea of portable entitlements - allowing a worker to carry entitlements over from one job to the next.

Read more: Self-employment and casual work aren't increasing but so many jobs are insecure – what's going on?

Labor’s shadow industrial relations minister Tony Burke would lead this “conversation” about protections.

In this first of a series of “vision statements” Albanese has sought to send the messages that Labor under his leadership is focused on jobs, is looking to the future and is not afraid of change.

The speech - which also cast a decarbonising economy as the generator of new jobs and a booming manufacturing industry - concentrated on repositioning Labor, not providing detailed policy.

Albanese emphasised the centrality of growth, and outlined a framework for tackling the problem of the mismatch in the labour market.

He pointed to a gulf between what employers needed and what workers had to offer, and described the vocational education and training system (VET) – already much overhauled by governments - as in crisis.

“We must commence a national project to repair our VET system,” he said.

Numbers working towards an apprenticeship had fallen, with 150,000 fewer apprentices and trainees today than when the Coalition government came in.

In government, he would seek a “circuit breaker”, with a new body along the lines of Infrastructure Australia, which he set up when a minister.

“Labor in government will establish a new national partnership to drive improved outcomes in the vocational education and training sector and to strengthen workforce planning, particularly in the growing sectors of our economy: Jobs and Skills Australia.”

This body “will be a genuine partnership across all sectors – business leaders, both large and small; state and territory governments; unions; education providers; and those who understand particular regions”.

Its functions would include

  • workforce and skills analysis

  • preparing capacity studies, including for emerging and growing industries

  • undertaking specific plans for targeted cohorts such as the regions, over-55 workers, and youth

  • reviewing the adequacy of the training and vocational system.

Its legislation would also require it to forecast workforce and skills needs for services government funded, and where demand was growing – specifically the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), aged care and health.

“This specific function will ensure that proper co-ordination occurs across all our human services investments and that the risk to service delivery or cost is reduced.”

Read more: Coal miners and urban greenies have one thing in common, and Labor must use it

Albanese said the jobs landscape a decade from now was uncertain.

“We can watch the tidal wave of change coming, then be swept away by it.

"Or we can protect our citizens by giving them a fair shot at a prosperous future,” he said.

“Government must understand the landscape and the forces that drive change. It must be proactive, not reactive.”

Authors: The Conversation

Read more http://theconversation.com/labor-looks-to-boost-protections-for-workers-in-insecure-jobs-albanese-126025