News Pronto

The Conversation

How TV cameras influence candidates' debate success

  • Written by Patrick A. Stewart, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Arkansas
It matters how the candidates appear on screen.NBC via Mediaite

As the Democratic Party continues to winnow its field of candidates to challenge President Donald Trump, it’s important to remember that the way candidates are covered on TV can influence public opinion. That’s become increasingly apparent in today’s media landscape,...

Read more: How TV cameras influence candidates' debate success

Vaping likely has dangers that could take years for scientists to even know about

  • Written by Ilona Jaspers, Professor of pediatrics, microbiology and immunology, and environmental sciences and engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
A man exhales after vaping Aug. 28, 2019 in Portland, Maine.Robert F. Bukaty/AP Photo

The rise in cases of otherwise healthy young adults who have been hospitalized or even died from vaping-associated lung injury is alarming.

Many people don’t know what is contained in these vaping devices, what the reported health effects actually mean, and,...

Read more: Vaping likely has dangers that could take years for scientists to even know about

Why community-owned grocery stores like co-ops are the best recipe for revitalizing food deserts

  • Written by Catherine Brinkley, Assistant Professor of Community and Regional Development, University of California, Davis
Detroit People's Food Co-op, opening later this year in a food desert, is an example of a community-driven project.DPFC

Tens of millions of Americans go to bed hungry at some point every year. While poverty is the primary culprit, some blame food insecurity on the lack of grocery stores in low-income neighborhoods.

That’s why cities, states and...

Read more: Why community-owned grocery stores like co-ops are the best recipe for revitalizing food deserts

Want to reform America's police? Look to firefighters

  • Written by Roscoe Scarborough, Assistant Professor of Sociology, College of Coastal Georgia
An institution's culture can affect the behavior of individual participants.Anthony Montoya/Shutterstock.com

Freddie Gray. Eric Garner. Michael Brown.

The deaths of black youth and men at the hands of police have sparked a nationwide conversation on discriminatory policing practices.

Media and the public often look to psychological explanations for d...

Read more: Want to reform America's police? Look to firefighters

Historically black colleges give graduates a wage boost

  • Written by Gregory N. Price, Professor, Economics, University of New Orleans
Research conflicts over how graduates of historically black colleges fare in the job market.sirtravelalot/Shutterstock.com

In 2010, two economists claimed that graduates of historically black colleges and universities, or HBCUs, suffer a “wage penalty” – that is, they earn relatively less than they would had they gone to a...

Read more: Historically black colleges give graduates a wage boost

In dandelions and fireflies, artists try to make sense of climate change

  • Written by Kate Flint, Provost Professor of Art History and English, University of Southern California – Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Visitors walk through Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama's installation 'Fireflies on the Water.'maurizio mucciola/flickr, CC BY-NC-ND

Climate change is real, it’s accelerating and it’s terrifying. We are adding carbon to the atmosphere at a rate 100 times faster than any previous natural increases, such as those that occurred at the end of...

Read more: In dandelions and fireflies, artists try to make sense of climate change

How do brains tune in to one neural signal out of billions?

  • Written by Salvatore Domenic Morgera, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering, University of South Florida
Your brain is conducting multiple orchestras of information at the same time.Enlighted Audio, CC BY

The human brain sends hundreds of billions of neural signals each second. It’s an extraordinarily complex feat.

A healthy brain must establish an enormous number of correct connections and ensure that they remain accurate for the entire period...

Read more: How do brains tune in to one neural signal out of billions?

The problem of living inside echo chambers

  • Written by C. Thi Nguyen, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Utah Valley University
Echo chambers are resistant to voices from outside.Beth Kuchera/Shutterstock

Pick any of the big topics of the day – Brexit, climate change or Trump’s immigration policies – and wander online.

What one is likely to find is radical polarization – different groups of people living in different worlds, populated with utterly...

Read more: The problem of living inside echo chambers

Could a toilet seat help prevent hospital readmissions?

  • Written by Nicholas Conn, Research Scientist, Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology
An engraving of a heart.www.shutterstock.com

America is aging rapidly. In the next 40 years, the number of people age 65 and older is expected to nearly double. Of these older Americans, more than 80% will have some form of heart disease.

As medical advances prolong life and help people survive heart attacks, more people end up living with congestive...

Read more: Could a toilet seat help prevent hospital readmissions?

Don't ignore serious nonmilitary threats to US national security

  • Written by Richard Forno, Senior Lecturer, Cybersecurity & Internet Researcher, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Storm clouds are gathering.Olaf Speier/Shutterstock.com

Almost two decades after thousands died in the attacks of 9/11, there remain many active efforts underway to protect America from international terrorism.

Since 9/11, American domestic and international security policy has been focused on individual terrorists, terrorist groups and rogue countr...

Read more: Don't ignore serious nonmilitary threats to US national security

More Articles ...

  1. 5 charts show how your household drives up global greenhouse gas emissions
  2. Why a plan to lower prescription drug prices should not be piecemeal
  3. The strange connection between Bobby Kennedy's death and Scooby-Doo
  4. Africa's Catholic churches face competition and a troubled legacy as they grow
  5. Indian Moon probe's failure won't stop an Asian space race that threatens regional security
  6. How giving legal rights to nature could help reduce toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie
  7. Curious Kids: Who was the first black child to go to an integrated school?
  8. 4 tips for selecting charities after disasters like Hurricane Dorian
  9. Market-based policies work to fight climate change, from India to Jamaica
  10. Math skills aren't enough to get through hard decisions – you need confidence, too
  11. How disinformation could sway the 2020 election
  12. Why your employer-sponsored insurance may ultimately not be good for you
  13. Far fewer Mexican immigrants are coming to the US -- and those who do are more educated
  14. In Brazil's rainforests, the worst fires are likely still to come
  15. I create manipulated images and videos – but quality may not matter much
  16. The hidden story of two African American women looking out from the pages of a 19th-century book
  17. Curious Kids: Why do burps make noise?
  18. How to increase access to gifted programs for low-income students and children of color
  19. How to increase access to gifted programs for low-income and black and Latino children
  20. What is Ashura? How this Shiite Muslim holiday inspires millions
  21. 'I'll have what she's having' – how and why we copy the choices of others
  22. Are you mentally well enough for college?
  23. Dr. Spock's timeless lessons in parenting
  24. New abortion laws contribute to sexist environments that harm everyone's health
  25. How climate change is driving emigration from Central America
  26. I wrote a book about email – and found myself pining for the days of letter-writing
  27. How nine days underwater helps scientists understand what life on a Moon base will be like
  28. Lessons from the UN peacekeeping mission in Rwanda, 25 years after the genocide it failed to stop
  29. How many Americans believe in climate change? Probably more than you think, research in Indiana suggests
  30. Why are there so few women CEOs?
  31. From cohabitation to cohousing: Older baby boomers create living arrangements to suit new needs
  32. How to get preschoolers ready to learn math
  33. Good communication is a key part of disaster response
  34. Here's what happens when political bubbles collide
  35. For some children born abroad, US citizenship has never been a guarantee
  36. 1 in 5 college students takes math courses that repeat what they already know
  37. Artificial intelligence in medicine raises legal and ethical concerns
  38. One skill that doesn't deteriorate with age
  39. Why methane emissions matter to climate change: 5 questions answered
  40. An opioid success story: Efforts to minimize painkillers after surgery appear to be working
  41. Why damage estimates for hurricanes like Dorian won't capture the full cost of climate change-fueled disasters
  42. Damage estimates for hurricanes like Dorian don't capture the full cost of climate change-fueled disasters
  43. Complex birdsongs help biologists piece together the evolution of lifelong learning
  44. The American Founders made sure the president could never suspend Congress
  45. Stop calling it a choice: Biological factors drive homosexuality
  46. 7 tips on how to take better notes
  47. In a world of cyber threats, the push for cyber peace is growing
  48. Evolution doesn't proceed in a straight line – so why draw it that way?
  49. How American Christian media promoted charity abroad
  50. How to address America's lead crisis and provide safe drinking water for all