News Pronto

The Conversation

Did we mishear Neil Armstrong's famous first words on the Moon?

  • Written by Melissa Michaud Baese-Berk, Associate Professor of Linguistics, University of Oregon
It's the case of the missing 'a.'Nick Lehr/The Conversation via NASA, CC BY-SA

On July 20, 1969, an estimated 650 million people watched in suspense as Neil Armstrong descended a ladder towards the surface of the Moon.

As he took his first steps, he uttered words that would be written into history books for generations to come: “That’s...

Read more: Did we mishear Neil Armstrong's famous first words on the Moon?

As flood risks increase across the US, it's time to recognize the limits of levees

  • Written by Amahia Mallea, Associate Professor of History, Drake University
Water rushes through a breached levee on the Arkansas River in Dardanelle, Ark., May 31, 2019.Yell County Sheriff's Department via AP

New Orleans averted disaster this month when tropical storm Barry delivered less rain in the Crescent City than forecasters originally feared. But Barry’s slog through Louisiana, Arkansas, Tennessee and...

Read more: As flood risks increase across the US, it's time to recognize the limits of levees

War's physical toll can last for generations, as it has for the children of the Vietnam War

  • Written by Michael Palmer, Senior Lecturer in Economics, University of Western Australia
People living in Vietnam today may still feel the effects of the war.Kylie Nicholson/shutterstock.com

History often focuses on the immediate death toll of war. But hostilities can have longer-term consequences on a population’s health.

In our new study published on June 5, weinvestigatedhow U.S. Air Force bombing in Vietnam during 1965 to 1975...

Read more: War's physical toll can last for generations, as it has for the children of the Vietnam War

When migrants go home, they bring back money, skills and ideas that can change a country

  • Written by Benjamin Waddell, Associate Professor of Sociology, Fort Lewis College
Between 1990 to 2015, nearly half of all migrants worldwide went back to their country of birth, whether by choice or by force.Shutterstock

Escaping violence, war, poverty and environmental disaster, more people than ever are migrating worldwide. Some 258 million people – 3.4% of the global population – live outside their country of...

Read more: When migrants go home, they bring back money, skills and ideas that can change a country

Young Americans deserve a 21st-century Moonshot to Mars

  • Written by Vahe Peroomian, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California – Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Mars should be the next destination for humankind.Gorodenkoff/Shutterstock.com

“Hidden Figures” and “First Man” were arguably the most inspirational space-themed movies of the last several years. Both, though, had to reach back to the glory days of John Glenn and Neil Armstrong. The faces of my children after watching these...

Read more: Young Americans deserve a 21st-century Moonshot to Mars

What is the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty? Here's why it's still important

  • Written by Ian Johnstone, Dean ad interim and Professor of International Law, Tufts University
Behrouz Kamalvandi, left, spokesman for Iran's atomic energy agency, listens to a man wearing a surgical mask, an official with the Ahmadi Roshan nuclear site in Natanz, Iran, during a news conference on May 20, 2019. IRIB News Agency via AP

Iran recently exceeded the limits on uranium enrichment set out in its nuclear deal with the U.S. and five...

Read more: What is the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty? Here's why it's still important

Mapping the Moon for Apollo

  • Written by Timothy Swindle, Professor of Planetary Sciences and Geosciences, University of Arizona
Fifty years ago, on July 20, 1969, humans stepped onto another celestial body and into history.NASA

At an International Astronomical Union meeting in 1955, noted astronomer Gerard Kuiper asked for suggestions and collaborators on a project to make a map of the Moon. At the time, the best lunar atlases had hand-drawn images, and Kuiper wanted to use...

Read more: Mapping the Moon for Apollo

University of California's showdown with the biggest academic publisher aims to change scholarly publishing for good

  • Written by MacKenzie Smith, University Librarian and Vice Provost for Digital Scholarship, University of California, Davis
For now, it's going to be trickier for the University of California community to access some academic journals.Michelle/Flickr, CC BY-NC-ND

This month, academic publisher Elsevier shuttered the University of California’s online access to current journal articles. It’s the latest move in the high stakes standoff between Elsevier, the worl...

Read more: University of California's showdown with the biggest academic publisher aims to change scholarly...

How do lithium-ion batteries work?

  • Written by Robert Masse, Ph.D. Student in Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington
Lithium-ion batteries power lots of different kinds of devices.Transport Canada

The smartphone era is only just over a decade old, but the pocket-sized computers at the heart of that societal transformation are only really possible because of another technology: lithium-ion batteries.

First sold commercially in 1991 by Sony for its camcorders, these...

Read more: How do lithium-ion batteries work?

The real midlife crisis confronting many Americans

  • Written by Frank J. Infurna, Associate Professor of Psychology, Arizona State University
Midlife is one of the least understood, appreciated and studied life stages.Sarah2/Shutterstock.com

The way my mom imagined it, midlife was going to be great: counting down days until retirement, spending winters in Florida and checking off destinations on her bucket list. But it hasn’t turned out that way.

Instead of more time spent in...

Read more: The real midlife crisis confronting many Americans

More Articles ...

  1. In divided Alaska, the choice is between paying for government or giving residents bigger oil wealth checks
  2. The ‘giant sucking sound’ of NAFTA: Ross Perot was ridiculed as alarmist in 1992 but his warning turned out to be prescient
  3. Trump's order for more action on kidney disease may shrink organ transplant waitlists
  4. Erdoğan's control over Turkey is ending – what comes next?
  5. Ticks spread plenty more for you to worry about beyond Lyme disease
  6. Could black philanthropy help solve the black student debt crisis?
  7. The Trump administration wants to dismantle the agency overseeing 2 million federal workers – and weaken safeguards against partisanship
  8. Long before Armstrong and Aldrin, artists were stoking dreams of space travel
  9. DNA testing companies offer telomere testing – but what does it tell you about aging and disease risk?
  10. How your diet contributes to nutrient pollution and dead zones in lakes and bays
  11. Commercial supersonic aircraft could return to the skies
  12. Why states and cities should stop handing out billions in economic incentives to companies
  13. How much is your data worth to tech companies? Lawmakers want to tell you, but it's not that easy to calculate
  14. How did people clean their teeth in the olden days?
  15. 'The Farewell' highlights tough conversations families face when confronted with death
  16. An invisible government agency produces crucial national security intelligence, but is anyone listening?
  17. Mexican president López Obrador has a woman problem
  18. Western states buy time with a 7-year Colorado River drought plan, but face a hotter, drier future
  19. At least 2% of US public water systems are like Flint's – Americans just don't hear about them
  20. Selecting groceries ahead of time helps some shoppers make healthier choices
  21. 4 questions answered on sex trafficking in the US
  22. The long, bipartisan history of dealing with immigrants harshly
  23. The forgotten history of segregated swimming pools and amusement parks
  24. A booming international movie market is transforming Hollywood
  25. Neuroscience and artificial intelligence can help improve each other
  26. Women are less supportive of space exploration – getting a woman on the Moon might change that
  27. How Congress lost power over trade deals – and why some lawmakers want it back
  28. Physician burnout: Why legal and regulatory systems may need to step in
  29. Climate change is affecting crop yields and reducing global food supplies
  30. Counterfeit alcohol, sometimes containing jet fuel or embalming fluid, is a growing concern for tourists abroad
  31. New York's new rental protections won't end the outside influence of big developers who pay the city's bills
  32. New York's new rental protections won't end the outsize influence of big developers who pay the city's bills
  33. 5 Moon-landing innovations that changed life on Earth
  34. A long-running immigration problem: The government sometimes detains and deports US citizens
  35. Hong Kong protests continue as China asserts more control over the island territory
  36. Why I made an app to document the seclusion and restraint of special education students
  37. Without parking, thousands of Americans who live in vehicles have nowhere to go
  38. Roberts rules: The 2 most important Supreme Court decisions this year were about fair elections and the chief justice
  39. So far cultured meat has been burgers – the next big challenge is animal-free steaks
  40. How indigenous women revolutionized Bolivian wrestling
  41. Confused about what to eat? Science can help
  42. What is personalized learning and why is it so controversial? 5 questions answered
  43. High-value opportunities exist to restore tropical rainforests around the world – here's how we mapped them
  44. Amazon is turning 25 – here's a look back at how it changed the world
  45. How America’s Founding Fathers felt about tariffs
  46. Mexicans in US routinely confront legal abuse, racial profiling, ICE targeting and other civil rights violations
  47. Why do rebel groups apologize?
  48. Trusting gut instincts to decide whether a military action is proportional opens a leader to psychological traps
  49. How the Dalai Lama is chosen and why China wants to appoint its own
  50. US agriculture needs a 21st-century New Deal