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Why are there so many candidates for president?

  • Written by Hans J. G. Hassell, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Florida State University

Seven Democratic presidential candidates gathered on national television early in the 1988 campaign to debate each other.

The field of candidates, derided by Republicans as the “Seven Dwarfs,” pales in comparison to the 24 Democratic candidates who have – at last count – declared their candidacy for president.

The seven...

Read more: Why are there so many candidates for president?

Doris Day was a sunny actress and a domestic violence survivor; are there lessons?

  • Written by Joan M. Cook, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Yale University
Doris Day pictured in 1965.AP File/AP Photo

Hollywood legend Doris Day died May 13, 2019 at age 97 at her home in Carmel Valley, California. The beautiful, blonde singer turned actress was viewed by many as America’s wholesome girl next door. In the 1940s, ‘50s and ‘60s, Day was a guaranteed motion picture box-office and...

Read more: Doris Day was a sunny actress and a domestic violence survivor; are there lessons?

21 questions for today's college graduates

  • Written by James Glaser, Professor, Dean of the School of Arts & Sciences, Tufts University
Students hug after a ceremony at Tufts University May 3. The ceremony celebrated 58 students who are the first in their family to receive a college degree.Anna Miller/Tufts University

Editors note: At a special ceremony for first-generation college graduates at Tufts University, James Glaser, dean of the school of arts and sciences, gave a...

Read more: 21 questions for today's college graduates

Laser of sound promises to measure extremely tiny phenomena

  • Written by Mishkat Bhattacharya, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology
The crests (bright) and troughs (dark) of waves spread out after they were produced. The picture applies to both light and sound waves.Titima Ongkantong

Most people are familiar with optical lasers through their experience with laser pointers. But what about a laser made from sound waves?

What makes optical laser light different from a light bulb or...

Read more: Laser of sound promises to measure extremely tiny phenomena

Stiff muscles are a counterintuitive superpower of NBA athletes

  • Written by Philip Anloague, Chair and Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, University of Dayton
What helps an athlete leap tall distances in a single bound?AP Photo/Tom Lynn

For most people, the term “stiffness” has negative connotations. When you wake up in the morning complaining of a “stiff back,” the remedy might include taking a hot shower, doing some yoga, swallowing aspirin, or visiting a physical therapist to...

Read more: Stiff muscles are a counterintuitive superpower of NBA athletes

This commencement speech had nothing but questions

  • Written by James Glaser, Professor, Dean of the School of Arts & Sciences, Tufts University
Students hug after a ceremony at Tufts University May 3. The ceremony celebrated 58 students who are the first in their family to receive a college degree.Anna Miller/Tufts University

Editors note: At a special ceremony for first-generation college graduates at Tufts University, James Glaser, dean of the school of arts and sciences, gave a...

Read more: This commencement speech had nothing but questions

A new type of laser uses sound waves to help to detect weak forces

  • Written by Mishkat Bhattacharya, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology
The crests (bright) and troughs (dark) of waves spread out after they were produced. The picture applies to both light and sound waves.Titima Ongkantong

Most people are familiar with optical lasers through their experience with laser pointers. But what about a laser made from sound waves?

What makes optical laser light different from a light bulb or...

Read more: A new type of laser uses sound waves to help to detect weak forces

Why parents should think twice about tracking apps for their kids

  • Written by Joel Michael Reynolds, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, University of Massachusetts Lowell
Are tracking technologies changing parenting?Trendsetter Images

The use of self-tracking and personal surveillance technologies has grown considerably over the last decade. There are now apps to monitor people’s movement, health, mindfulness, sleep, eating habits and even sexual activity.

Some of the more thorny problems arise from apps...

Read more: Why parents should think twice about tracking apps for their kids

New Gates-funded commission aims to put a value on a college education

  • Written by Nicholas Tampio, Professor of Political Science, Fordham University
A growing movement is forming to focus on the economic benefits of a college degree.Alex Oakenman from www.shutterstock.com

The Gates Foundation is poised to disrupt American higher education with a new Postsecondary Value Commission. As its name suggests, the commission aims to define the value of a college degree.

Among other things, the...

Read more: New Gates-funded commission aims to put a value on a college education

US fertility keeps dropping – but that's not a reason to panic

  • Written by Caroline Sten Hartnett, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of South Carolina
In 2018, the national birth rate hit a 32-year low.Pixel-Shot/shutterstock.com

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on May 15 that the number of births in the U.S. is down 2% – “the lowest number of births in 32 years.”

These reports were met with surprise and alarm. USA Today, for example, led with the headline &...

Read more: US fertility keeps dropping – but that's not a reason to panic

More Articles ...

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  2. Your internet data is rotting
  3. Secrecy versus sunshine: Efforts to hide government records never stop
  4. Retired oil rigs off the California coast could find new lives as artificial reefs
  5. We’re just beginning to grasp the toll of the Islamic State's archaeological looting in Syria
  6. Buttigieg's call for universal public service would mark a big departure from historically small volunteer programs
  7. Facebook's 'transparency' efforts hide key reasons for showing ads
  8. How traumatic injury has become a health care crisis
  9. Tooth fairy study reveals children near lead smelters are exposed to dangerous lead in the womb
  10. Boredom in the mating market: Guppies demonstrate why it’s good to stand out
  11. Sunscreen wouldn't have saved Bob Marley from melanoma, and it won't help other dark-skinned people
  12. Is the brain parasite _Toxoplasma_ manipulating your behavior, or is your immune system to blame?
  13. Long considered a high honor, the valedictorian tradition faces an uncertain future
  14. The electric vehicle revolution will come from China, not the US
  15. How is climate change affecting fishes? There are clues inside their ears
  16. Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize? Japan's nomination is part of a strategic plan
  17. When Americans go to the polls, they look to the past – not the future
  18. China-US trade war heats up: 3 reasons it won't cool down anytime soon
  19. Charging asylum application fees is the latest way the US could make immigrants pay for its red tape
  20. Worried about sexual harassment – or false allegations? Our team asked Americans about their experiences and beliefs
  21. Demise of Walmart 'greeters' reveals shortcomings in the Americans with Disabilities Act
  22. Are yoga and mindfulness in schools religious?
  23. The unique harm of sexual abuse in the black community
  24. How cryptocurrency scams work
  25. Truth, justice and declassification: Secret archives show US helped Argentine military wage 'dirty war' that killed 30,000
  26. What happens when a raindrop hits a puddle?
  27. The black Muslim female fashion trailblazers who came before model Halima Aden
  28. Activists want a San Francisco high school mural removed, saying its impact today should overshadow the artist's intentions
  29. How Uber and other digital platforms could trick us using behavioral science – unless we act fast
  30. Road to measles elimination is predictable, but can be rocky
  31. Colorado shooting eerily recalls Columbine massacre
  32. US 'foreign terrorist' designation is more punishment than threat detector
  33. Women entrepreneurs thrive managing talented teams and balancing many investors
  34. Deep sea carbon reservoirs once superheated the Earth – could it happen again?
  35. Misery and memory in Glendora, Mississippi: How poverty is reshaping the story of Emmett Till's murder
  36. Will Trump's use of executive privilege help him avoid congressional oversight? It didn't help Richard Nixon
  37. Uber drivers strike and the future of labor: 4 essential reads
  38. Psychology behind why your mom may be the mother of all heroes
  39. Why the ancient promise of alchemy is fulfilled in reading
  40. Trump's 'energy dominance' ambitions hit another snag on the West Coast
  41. Harsh punishments under Sharia are modern interpretations of an ancient tradition
  42. Electricity grid cybersecurity will be expensive – who will pay, and how much?
  43. Science images can capture attention and pique curiosity in a way words alone can't
  44. From 'Total exoneration!' to 'Impeach now!' – the Mueller report and dueling fact perceptions
  45. Predicting the next stock market 'flash crash'
  46. Why the IRS is legally required to give Congress Trump's tax returns – but probably won't
  47. Robotic health care is coming to a hospital near you
  48. What geology reveals about North Korea's nuclear weapons – and what it obscures
  49. Coral reefs provide flood protection worth $1.8 billion every year – it's time to protect them
  50. Trump’s one-on-one approach to China has dangerous implications for global trade and world peace