News Pronto
 

The Conversation

What can fish mouths teach us about engineering clog-free filters?

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageFilter-feeding fish have had 150 million years to improve filtration.Rob Holm / USFWS, CC BY

Filter-feeding fish accomplish a feat that human technologies cannot: species including goldfish, menhaden and basking sharks filter tiny algal cells or shrimp-like prey from huge volumes of water without clogging their oral filters.

Since fish have been...

Read more: What can fish mouths teach us about engineering clog-free filters?

Can a Russian-funded cable network actually promote free press in the U.S.?

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor

With the recently announced shutdown of Al Jazeera America, the alternative cable news scene is in flux.

Launched as a corrective to the politicized and spectacle-heavy programming of Fox News, CNN and MSNBC, Al Jazeera America positioned itself as a fact-based, unbiased news source. Even though the network won awards for reporting, the Qatari...

Read more: Can a Russian-funded cable network actually promote free press in the U.S.?

When do children develop their gender identity?

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageWhen do girls come to like pink and boys blue?AquaOwl, CC BY-NC-ND

Gender is generally thought of as a stable trait: we are born male or female and we stay that way as we grow from small children to adults.

It turns out that for young children, initial concepts about gender are quite flexible. In my own research, I’ve found that children don&rs...

Read more: When do children develop their gender identity?

Should security forces have stopped the terrorist attacks in Belgium?

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor

Two attacks in Brussels last week left 31 dead and many others wounded. They also produced a barrage of criticism about the apparent laxity of Belgium’s intelligence and security services.

It is easy to criticize the many lapses that allowed this tragedy to unfold. Observers may wonder why Belgium security forces failed to heed an explicit...

Read more: Should security forces have stopped the terrorist attacks in Belgium?

Can free trade and TPP survive rise of the 'new right'?

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor

If there is one area on which the more extreme representatives of the political left and right can agree, it is the nefarious character of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), the comprehensive trade deal signed last month by President Barack Obama and the leaders of 11 other Pacific nations.

Republican front-runner Donald Trump calls TPP “a...

Read more: Can free trade and TPP survive rise of the 'new right'?

We don't talk much about nanotechnology risks anymore, but that doesn't mean they're gone

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageVantablack is the darkest pigment ever – thanks to carbon nanotubes.Surrey NanoSystems, CC BY-ND

Back in 2008, carbon nanotubes – exceptionally fine tubes made up of carbon atoms – were making headlines. A new study from the U.K. had just shown that, under some conditions, these long, slender fiber-like tubes could cause harm in...

Read more: We don't talk much about nanotechnology risks anymore, but that doesn't mean they're gone

Mexican desert mangroves – small but valuable in dealing with climate change

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor

Scientists have long known that mangroves provide vital barriers against storms and that these forests can store vast amounts of carbon.

An article published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences highlights again why mangroves are important for coastlines, ecosystems and the planet’s human populations.

This study,...

Read more: Mexican desert mangroves – small but valuable in dealing with climate change

Could the language barrier actually fall within the next 10 years?

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imagePieter Bruegel the Elder's 'The Tower of Babel' (1563).Wikimedia Commons

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to travel to a foreign country without having to worry about the nuisance of communicating in a different language?

In a recent Wall Street Journalarticle, technology policy expert Alec Ross argued that, within a decade or so, we’ll be...

Read more: Could the language barrier actually fall within the next 10 years?

Athletes look for an edge in a new place: virtual reality

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor

Virtual reality (VR) appears ready to take the entertainment world by storm in 2016. In addition to the much-hyped Oculus Rift, major corporations such as Facebook, Sony and Samsung are poised to release high-quality VR headsets to the public this year. After years of VR being discussed as the “next big thing,” this may be the year...

Read more: Athletes look for an edge in a new place: virtual reality

If we don't own our genes, what protects study subjects in genetic research?

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageWho's in charge once your biological material is out of your body?igemhq, CC BY

On February 25, the White House hosted a forum on the National Institute of Health’s Precision Medicine Initiative. This is an ambitious research study that aims to develop targeted drugs and treatments that would vary from individual to individual.

To reach the...

Read more: If we don't own our genes, what protects study subjects in genetic research?

More Articles ...

  1. Is global warming causing marine diseases to spread?
  2. Here's how witnessing violence harms children’s mental health
  3. Will voters' fear of terrorism propel Trump to the White House?
  4. Will the new education law allow for teachers with lower qualifications?
  5. Scientists turn to 3D printing, digital simulations to treat heart disease
  6. Why it makes little sense to regulate rainwater barrels in the dry western U.S.
  7. The other opioid crisis -- people in poor countries can't get the pain medication they need
  8. Cuba's sustainable agriculture at risk in U.S. thaw
  9. How the death penalty may keep innocent people in prison
  10. The Common Core explained
  11. Why do people risk their lives – or the lives of others – for the perfect selfie?
  12. Cheap gas could delay America's efficiency targets for cars and trucks
  13. How to transform workers' campaign rage into better jobs and wages
  14. Big data security problems threaten consumers' privacy
  15. Will requiring food stamp retailers to sell more healthy food make it easier for SNAP recipients to eat better?
  16. Humanizing the heroin epidemic: a photo essay
  17. The history of student loans goes back to the Middle Ages
  18. Brussels attacks: how radicalization happens and who is at risk
  19. President Trump's foreign policy dystopia
  20. American elections ranked worst among Western democracies. Here’s why.
  21. Are blondes actually dumb?
  22. Do protectionist policies like Trump's lead to trade wars?
  23. To empower women, give them better access to water
  24. Will the end of breeding orcas at SeaWorld change much for animals in captivity?
  25. Global warming is pushing wine harvests earlier – but not necessarily for the better
  26. What we've learned from the deadly Oso, Washington landslide two years on
  27. How the Grand Canyon changed our ideas of natural beauty
  28. A nation at risk -- how gifted, low-income kids are left behind
  29. In TV's shifting landscape, advertisers scramble to adapt
  30. Radiation combined with immune-stimulating drugs could pack a powerful punch against cancer cells
  31. What two legal scholars learned from studying 70 years of Supreme Court confirmation hearings
  32. Fighting superbugs with nanotechnology and light
  33. As Obama makes historic visit, is Cuba ready for change?
  34. Polar bears, Princess Diana, gun rights: The opinions of Obama's Supreme Court nominee, Merrick Garland
  35. Does the First Amendment protect people who film the police?
  36. Acne treatment: antibiotics don't need to kill bacteria to clear up your skin
  37. Picture of Pluto further refined by months of New Horizons data
  38. How do children decide what's fair?
  39. A look inside the Czech Republic's booming fertility holiday industry
  40. Beyond today's crowdsourced science to tomorrow's citizen science cyborgs
  41. Net neutrality may be at risk when companies like Netflix subsidize your data
  42. Roots of opioid epidemic can be traced back to two key changes in pain management
  43. Will cheap gas at the pump stall progress on car emissions?
  44. What kind of judge is Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland?
  45. How Bernie Sanders made the Democratic Party safe for liberals
  46. How much math do you need to win your March Madness pool?
  47. Zika and abortion: will the virus prompt Latin America to rethink abortion and birth control?
  48. In a state wrought with racial tension, Jackie Robinson suited up for his first spring training game
  49. The view from Ohio: Kasich's win and what's next
  50. Recalculating! By not driving the optimal route, you're causing traffic jams