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Labor's rank and file still believe in collective bargaining's power to bolster middle class

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageUAW workers are fighting back.Reuters

When members of the United Auto Workers (UAW) approved a new contract with Fiat Chrysler on October 22, they ended a contentious round of negotiations that exposed rank-and-file discontent over a two-tier wage system that one worker described as “at odds with union principles.”

In a rare move just a...

Read more: Labor's rank and file still believe in collective bargaining's power to bolster middle class

Think you're reading the news for free? New research shows you're likely paying with your privacy

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageYou might not know the extent to which news sites are exposing your information to third-party servers.'News' via www.shutterstock.com

You may already know that every time you go online, your browsing history could be exposed to numerous advertisers and data brokers who then send you “targeted” advertisements.

But what about visiting the...

Read more: Think you're reading the news for free? New research shows you're likely paying with your privacy

It's not rocket science: we need a better way to get to space

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageUnmanned rocket explodes moments after launch.NASA/Joel Kowsky, CC BY-NC-ND

Human beings will always be explorers. We’ve pretty well surveyed our planet, our tiny blue dot, for answers and only found more questions. Why are we here? How did we get here? What does it mean?

imageWhat happens when vast numbers of us can leave our tiny blue dot behind?N...

Read more: It's not rocket science: we need a better way to get to space

Will the Arctic shift from a carbon sink to a carbon source?

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageThe warming global climate is causing fundamental changes to the carbon cycle in northern parts of the world. peupleloup/flickr, CC BY-SA

Studies show that the warming of the climate system is altering the movement and storage of carbon in the far north of the Earth. And these changes carry global implications. Among the many questions that...

Read more: Will the Arctic shift from a carbon sink to a carbon source?

'Powerpoint was not his thing': a poem on teaching and technology

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageThe Parana River in moonlight. Gisela Giardino, CC BY-SA

I am a scholar and teacher of Spanish and Portuguese. I am also a poet.

The several books of poetry I have published in English, Spanish and Guarani (an indigenous South American language and one of the official languages of Paraguay), plus numerous readings of my work, both in Paraguay and at...

Read more: 'Powerpoint was not his thing': a poem on teaching and technology

On the 120th anniversary of the X-ray, a look at how it changed our view of the world

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageWilhelm Conrad Roentgen looking into an X-ray screen placed in front of a man's body and seeing the ribs and the bones of the arm.Wellcome Library, London, CC BY

Sunday, November 8 marks the 120th anniversary of one of the greatest moments in the history of science: an obscure German physics professor’s discovery of the X-ray. His name was...

Read more: On the 120th anniversary of the X-ray, a look at how it changed our view of the world

Ben Carson: token candidate

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageCarson smiles at the CNBC GOP debate. Rick Wilking/REUTERS

Ben Carson has now overtaken Donald Trump in the national polls as the GOP front-runner.

As a black man, I’m not at all sure how I should feel about this.

On the one hand, he represents a party that has dedicated itself to opposing President Obama at every turn, mostly because the pres...

Read more: Ben Carson: token candidate

How we got to now: why the US and Europe went different ways on GMOs

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imagePart of the ongoing debate: some papaya growers in Hawaii have planted a strain that has been genetically modified to resist a virus.remembertobreathe/flickr, CC BY-NC-ND

There is a myth that circulates on both sides of the Atlantic: Americans accepted genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in their food supply without question, while the more...

Read more: How we got to now: why the US and Europe went different ways on GMOs

How do our brains reconstruct the visual world?

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageYou see with your brain, not just your eyes.Amarpreet K, CC BY-NC-ND

Given that we see the world through two small, flat retinae at the backs of our eyes, it seems remarkable that what each of us perceives is a seamless, three-dimensional visual world.

The retinae respond to various wavelengths of light from the world around us. But that’s...

Read more: How do our brains reconstruct the visual world?

Here are some more reasons why liberal arts matter

  • Written by The Conversation Contributor
imageWhat constitutes liberal arts?University of Central Arkansas, CC BY-NC-ND

Lately, in the heated call for greater STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) education at every level, the traditional liberal arts have been needlessly, indeed recklessly, portrayed as the villain. And STEM fields have been (falsely) portrayed as the very opposite of...

Read more: Here are some more reasons why liberal arts matter

More Articles ...

  1. Labs make new, dangerous synthetic cannabinoid drugs faster than we can ban them
  2. How campaign finance disenfranchises America's silent majority of socialists
  3. Do refugees have a 'right' to hospitality?
  4. Sam Smith's ambitious attempt to reshape the Bond song lands with a whimper
  5. Ted Cruz's birther problem
  6. Delayed or killed, Keystone pipeline will live on as political touchstone
  7. What is the legacy of Yitzhak Rabin?
  8. Ohio strikes blow against gerrymandering
  9. If a solar plant uses natural gas, is it still green?
  10. Lessons from Newark: why school reforms will not work without addressing poverty
  11. Wedding bells or single again: psychology predicts where your relationship is headed
  12. In the verses of Jordan's most popular poet, the hopes and fears of the Arab world
  13. Eleven body fluids we couldn’t live without
  14. Some find redemption on death row, but few find mercy
  15. In our Wi-Fi world, the internet still depends on undersea cables
  16. As US shutters aging nuclear plants, cutting emissions will become more costly
  17. What Grantland's demise says about ESPN's past and future ambitions
  18. Why Asian Americans don't vote Republican
  19. 'Rise' of China's yuan is much ado about little
  20. The biggest sticking point in Paris climate talks: money
  21. Look what is being sold to kids when they are in school
  22. What do the new breast cancer screening guidelines recommend about when to start yearly mammograms?
  23. It turns out clothes really do make the man
  24. Cities are booming but progress is uneven and, to some, too costly
  25. Hearing ghost voices relies on pseudoscience and fallibility of human perception
  26. Is one of the largest real estate deals in American history a requiem for middle-class New York?
  27. Why mayors are looking for ideas outside the city limits
  28. Can innovators build a future that's both disruptive and just?
  29. They might sound gross, but intestinal worms can actually be good for you
  30. What gets students motivated to work harder? Not money
  31. Paul Ryan just accepted the worst job in politics
  32. Breaking the link between a conservative worldview and climate skepticism
  33. What should we make of Paul Ryan’s fondness for Ayn Rand?
  34. Evolutionary psychology explains why haunted houses creep us out
  35. Solar power can cut consumers' bills and still be good for utilities
  36. Do liberal arts students learn how to collaborate?
  37. Scholars on the GOP debate: middle-class struggles take center stage as Rubio walks tightrope
  38. How CNBC created a GOP debate for the Twitter age
  39. Why can’t the UN protect civilians in places like Syria?
  40. What are the limits to free speech in schools?
  41. How texting helped fuel the anti-austerity protests roiling Europe
  42. In the fight against anemia, iron fortification is a clutch player
  43. Why aren't more women running for office?
  44. Could Hurricane Patricia be a harbinger of storms in a warming climate?
  45. Does 'translating' Shakespeare into modern English diminish its greatness?
  46. Why Google's plan to blanket wilderness with Wi-Fi is a bad idea
  47. Sugar isn't just empty, fattening calories -- it's making us sick
  48. California universities launch experiment to go carbon-neutral 'at scale'
  49. Tracking American eels on the open sea to crack the mystery of their migration
  50. When gang violence goes viral