The Conversation

Los padres primerizos usan las redes sociales para entender su nuevo papel

  • Written by Tawfiq Ammari, Ph.D. Candidate in Information, University of Michigan
La información que comparten los padres en línea los ayuda a enfocarse en su papel a medida que la sociedad cambia.Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

Un abogado en las Bermudas se hizo famoso en Internet por haber bailado ballet junto a su hija de dos años, esto le ofreció confort para vencer su miedo...

Read more: Los padres primerizos usan las redes sociales para entender su nuevo papel

Dozens of migrants disappear in Mexico as Central American caravan pushes northward

  • Written by Luis Gómez Romero, Senior Lecturer in Human Rights, Constitutional Law and Legal Theory, University of Wollongong
Migrants travel in groups through Mexico for safety reasons. But Mexico is still one of the world's most dangerous countries.AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

The Hondurans who banded together last month to travel northward to the United States, fleeing gangs, corruption and poverty, were joined by thousands of other Central Americans. Many hoped to find safety...

Read more: Dozens of migrants disappear in Mexico as Central American caravan pushes northward

How anti-black bias in white men hurts black men's health

  • Written by Shervin Assari, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Public Health, University of Michigan
Discrimination creates gaps in care between white and black men. Rawpixel/Shutterstock.com, CC BY-SA

Researchers have documented “large, pervasive and persistent” racial inequalities in the U.S. Inter-group relations are among the factors that contribute to such disparities, many of which manifest themselves in gaps in health care.

As...

Read more: How anti-black bias in white men hurts black men's health

A vaccine that could block mosquitoes from transmitting malaria

  • Written by Wei-Chiao Huang, Ph.D. Candidate in the Biomedical Engineering Department, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
High magnification view of mosquito pupae and larvae underwater.7th Son Studio/shutterstock

Is it possible to eradicate malaria?

It is a question with which many researchers have grappled, and many ideas have been proposed. The reason malaria has garnered so much attention is that it is one of the deadliest diseases, infecting 200 million people...

Read more: A vaccine that could block mosquitoes from transmitting malaria

Why are some Americans changing their names?

  • Written by Kirsten Fermaglich, Associate Professor, Michigan State University
For decades, native-born American Jews changed their names to improve their job prospects.Billion Photos/Shutterstock.com

In 2008, Newsweek published an article on then-presidential candidate Barack Obama titled “From Barry to Barack.”

The story explained how Obama’s Kenyan father, Barack Obama Sr., chose Barry as a nickname for...

Read more: Why are some Americans changing their names?

Sci-fi movies are the secret weapon that could help Silicon Valley grow up

  • Written by Andrew Maynard, Director, Risk Innovation Lab, Arizona State University
If you don't want to be facing down an angry dinosaur, pay attention to what happens on screen.Universal Pictures

If there’s one line that stands the test of time in Steven Spielberg’s 1993 classic “Jurassic Park,” it’s probably Jeff Goldblum’s exclamation, “Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether...

Read more: Sci-fi movies are the secret weapon that could help Silicon Valley grow up

Maine congressional election an important test of ranked-choice voting

  • Written by Steven Mulroy, Law Professor in Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Election Law, University of Memphis
With no candidate taking a majority of the overall vote, election officials will be counting ballots again under Maine's new ranked-choice voting system.AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty

In Maine’s 2nd Congressional District, an innovative vote-counting system is having its trial run in a federal election.

No candidate received a majority of the...

Read more: Maine congressional election an important test of ranked-choice voting

Why covering the environment is one of the most dangerous beats in journalism

  • Written by Eric Freedman, Professor of Journalism and Chair, Knight Center for Environmental Journalism, Michigan State University
Journalists who cover illegal operations like logging at this site in northern Sagaing division, Myanmar, can face threats and violence. AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe

From the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Kashoggi by Saudi agents to President Trump’s clashes with the White House press corps, attacks on reporters are in the news. This...

Read more: Why covering the environment is one of the most dangerous beats in journalism

Fine particle air pollution is a public health emergency hiding in plain sight

  • Written by Douglas Brugge, Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University
A Kosovo policeman directs cars in Pristina after the government banned traffic in response to extremely high fine particle pollution levels, Jan. 31, 2018.AP Photo/Visar Kryeziu

Ambient air pollution is the largest environmental health problem in the United States and in the world more generally. Fine particulate matter smaller than 2.5 millionths...

Read more: Fine particle air pollution is a public health emergency hiding in plain sight

3 ways the women's movement in US politics is misunderstood

  • Written by Deana Rohlinger, Professor of Sociology, Florida State University
Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey after winning the election.AP Photo/Butch Dill

A record number of women are headed to statehouses and Capitol Hill in 2019. One hundred women were elected to the U.S. House, which means that at least 121 women will serve in the 116th Congress – up from the current 107.

Twelve women were elected to the U.S. Senate. This...

Read more: 3 ways the women's movement in US politics is misunderstood

More Articles ...

  1. Why politicians are the real winners in Amazon's HQ2 bidding war
  2. Hay una solución sencilla a la falta de sueño de los jóvenes
  3. A county in Idaho offered Spanish-language ballots for the first time and here's what happened
  4. Craigslist can cut solid waste, one used sofa at a time
  5. From bicycle to social movements, the changing role of chaplains in the US
  6. Partial mycoheterotrophs: The green plants that feed on fungi
  7. Skipping a few thousand years: Rapid domestication of the groundcherry using gene editing
  8. The counties where the anti-vaccine movement thrives in the US
  9. Can artisanal weed compete with 'Big Marijuana'?
  10. Will China help Trump denuclearize North Korea?
  11. Trump's new Iranian oil sanctions may inflict pain at home without serving strategic objectives
  12. Move more, sit less – great advice, but how can we make time for exercise?
  13. Neuroscientists identify a surprising low-tech fix to the problem of sleep-deprived teens
  14. Why space debris cleanup might be a national security threat
  15. The world's plastic problem is bigger than the ocean
  16. Why the history of messianic Judaism is so fraught and complicated
  17. Volcanic eruptions once caused mass extinctions in the oceans – could climate change do the same?
  18. More American students are studying abroad, new data show
  19. Measuring racial profiling: Why it's hard to tell where police are treating minorities unfairly
  20. Commemorating the 'Great War,' America's forgotten conflict
  21. Cómo entender las cifras en las noticias: Tres trucos estadísticos
  22. 5 things to know about Fabiano Caruana and his quest to become world chess champion
  23. Americans got to vote on lots of energy measures in 2018 – and mostly rejected them
  24. What mass shootings do to those not shot: Social consequences of mass gun violence
  25. Myths and unknowns about chess and the contenders for the World Chess Championship
  26. The early-20th century German trans-rights activist who was decades ahead of his time
  27. Could consciousness all come down to the way things vibrate?
  28. 3 things Jeff Sessions did as attorney general that history should remember
  29. How many women does it take to change a broken Congress?
  30. As Arctic ship traffic increases, narwhals and other unique animals are at risk
  31. Trump's tariffs don't apply to American flag imports from China – but they should
  32. Singles Day shows China's global retail power
  33. Americans elected mayors who care about climate change
  34. The 116th Congress has more women and people of color than ever – but there's still room to improve
  35. Veterans have fought in wars – and fought against them
  36. On the 100th anniversary of WWI's end, lessons on life in health care's trenches
  37. Elecciones EEUU: Población latina puede ser una fuerza electoral en 2020
  38. Blasphemy law is repealed in Ireland, enforced in Pakistan – and a problem in many Christian and Muslim countries
  39. What is public service loan forgiveness? And how do I qualify to get it?
  40. How a self-powered glucose-monitoring device could help people with diabetes
  41. The other 2018 midterm wave: A historic 10-point jump in turnout among young people
  42. #MeToo could become a national reckoning – if the new House treats it like a financial crisis
  43. Driving autonomous cars off the beaten path
  44. How the ‘wave of women’ entering congress could turn the #MeToo movement into concrete action
  45. The votes have been counted, the results are (mostly) in: What’s next for health care?
  46. Left behind: The midterm view from Iowa
  47. The US government has huge debts, and House Democrats could lead the way on solutions – an economist explains how
  48. Coloradans reject restrictions on drilling distances from homes and schools
  49. Latinos can be an electoral force in 2020
  50. La gripe sobrevive más de una hora en el aire y en las superficies