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Adapting cities to a hotter world: 3 essential reads

  • Written by Jennifer Weeks, Environment + Energy Editor, The Conversation
Keeping cool in Brooklyn.A. Katz/Shutterstock

Heat waves can be deadly, especially when they combine high temperatures with elevated humidity levels that make the air feel even hotter. The impacts can be especially strong in cities, which often are several degrees warmer than nearby rural areas due to the urban heat island effect. These three...

Read more: Adapting cities to a hotter world: 3 essential reads

Heat stroke: A doctor offers tips to stay safe as temperatures soar

  • Written by Gabriel Neal, Clinical Assistant Professor of Family Medicine, Texas A&M University
Staying hydrated is key to avoiding heat stroke and other heat-related health problems.FocusStocker/Shutterstock.com

I easily remember laughing at Wile E. Coyote trying to catch the Road Runner while watching Saturday morning cartoons as a child. I can still see the Coyote walking slowly through the sweltering desert, sun high in the sky,...

Read more: Heat stroke: A doctor offers tips to stay safe as temperatures soar

Why the federal government isn't prosecuting the officer who choked Eric Garner

  • Written by Caren Morrison, Associate Professor of Law, Georgia State University
Gwen Carr, Eric Garner's mother, says the federal government should have filed charges.AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews

The Justice Department won’t file federal charges against the New York City police officer who put Eric Garner into the chokehold that led to his death. With the statute of limitations having run out, the case, legally, is closed.

The...

Read more: Why the federal government isn't prosecuting the officer who choked Eric Garner

Washington state's big bet on 'free college'

  • Written by William Zumeta, Professor of Public Policy and Governance and Professor of Education, University of Washington
Washington state has passed a measure to cover college tuition for students from low- and moderate-income families.VDB Photos/Shutterstock.com

Washington state doesn’t have a problem finding educated people to work in its booming high-tech economy – it’s just most of those people come from out of state.

This is why Washington...

Read more: Washington state's big bet on 'free college'

Better design could make mobile devices easier for seniors to use

  • Written by Edward Henry Steinfeld, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Architecture, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
If all of these devices really work together, they can be a bigger help than any one of them alone.Pro Image Content/Shutterstock.com

A loud “bing” sounded as we drove onto the highway access ramp. I didn’t see a message on our car’s screen. Was it my phone or my wife’s? Was it a calendar alert, or did one of us...

Read more: Better design could make mobile devices easier for seniors to use

The dysfunctional debt ceiling and why we should kill it: 5 questions answered

  • Written by Steven Pressman, Professor of Economics, Colorado State University
Treasury Secretary Mnuchin is taking 'extraordinary measures' to avoid busting the debt ceiling. AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Editor’s note: The U.S. government maxed out its national credit card in March and has been moving money around ever since to avoid running out of cash. Very soon the Treasury Department will reach the limits of this...

Read more: The dysfunctional debt ceiling and why we should kill it: 5 questions answered

A giant leap for humankind -- future Moon missions will include diverse astronauts and more partners

  • Written by Sara M. Langston, Assistant Professor of Spaceflight Operations, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
This second era of space exploration will include a diverse corp of astronauts.studiostoks/Shutterstock.com

As NASA celebrates the 50th anniversary of the historic Moon landing with a live TV broadcast and events, there is a focus on recognizing the contributions of the thousands of men and women who made the Apollo 11 mission possible. This year...

Read more: A giant leap for humankind -- future Moon missions will include diverse astronauts and more partners

Home birth may start babies off with health-promoting microbes

  • Written by Joan Combellick, Assistant Clinical Professor of Midwifery, Yale University
What are the differences between planned assisted childbirth with midwife at home versus delivery with obstetrician at a hospital?M-SUR/Shutterstock.com

For all of human history, babies have been born where their mothers lived – whether in a house, hut or cave. Only in the last century has birth moved out of the home and into the hospital....

Read more: Home birth may start babies off with health-promoting microbes

How the Volkswagen Beetle sparked America's art car movement

  • Written by John A. Heitmann, Professor Emeritus of History, University of Dayton
A 'back-to-back' Beetle rolls along the road at the 2006 Houston Art Car Parade. D.L./flickr, CC BY-SA

With a mariachi band playing along, the last Volkswagen Beetle rolled off the assembly line of a Mexican factory on July 10.

Originally created in Germany at the behest of Adolf Hitler, the Beetle ended up being exported around the world, and every...

Read more: How the Volkswagen Beetle sparked America's art car movement

Justice Stevens, Babe Ruth and the best law clerk assignment ever

  • Written by Merritt McAlister, Assistant Professor of Law, University of Florida
U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens winds up to throw out the first pitch before the start of the Chicago Cubs game on Sept. 14, 2005.AP Photo/Jeff Roberson

When I saw Justice John Paul Stevens this May at a gathering of his former law clerks to celebrate his 99th birthday, we discussed what he told me was the “easiest”...

Read more: Justice Stevens, Babe Ruth and the best law clerk assignment ever

More Articles ...

  1. Voices from an age of uncertain work – Americans miss stability and a shared sense of purpose in their jobs
  2. Trump wasn't the first president to confront the Supreme Court – and back down
  3. Robert Hooke: The 'English Leonardo' who was a 17th-century scientific superstar
  4. 5 things parents need to know about 'summer loss'
  5. Counting 11 million undocumented immigrants is easier than Trump thinks
  6. How immigrants give American companies a powerful boost against Chinese rivals
  7. Can protecting land promote employment? In New England, the answer is yes
  8. The Bible says to welcome refugees
  9. 3 myths to bust about breaking up 'big tech'
  10. Americans focus on responding to earthquake damage, not preventing it, because they're unaware of their risk
  11. Did we mishear Neil Armstrong's famous first words on the Moon?
  12. As flood risks increase across the US, it's time to recognize the limits of levees
  13. War's physical toll can last for generations, as it has for the children of the Vietnam War
  14. When migrants go home, they bring back money, skills and ideas that can change a country
  15. Young Americans deserve a 21st-century Moonshot to Mars
  16. What is the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty? Here's why it's still important
  17. Mapping the Moon for Apollo
  18. University of California's showdown with the biggest academic publisher aims to change scholarly publishing for good
  19. How do lithium-ion batteries work?
  20. The real midlife crisis confronting many Americans
  21. In divided Alaska, the choice is between paying for government or giving residents bigger oil wealth checks
  22. The ‘giant sucking sound’ of NAFTA: Ross Perot was ridiculed as alarmist in 1992 but his warning turned out to be prescient
  23. Trump's order for more action on kidney disease may shrink organ transplant waitlists
  24. Erdoğan's control over Turkey is ending – what comes next?
  25. Ticks spread plenty more for you to worry about beyond Lyme disease
  26. Could black philanthropy help solve the black student debt crisis?
  27. The Trump administration wants to dismantle the agency overseeing 2 million federal workers – and weaken safeguards against partisanship
  28. Long before Armstrong and Aldrin, artists were stoking dreams of space travel
  29. DNA testing companies offer telomere testing – but what does it tell you about aging and disease risk?
  30. How your diet contributes to nutrient pollution and dead zones in lakes and bays
  31. Commercial supersonic aircraft could return to the skies
  32. Why states and cities should stop handing out billions in economic incentives to companies
  33. How much is your data worth to tech companies? Lawmakers want to tell you, but it's not that easy to calculate
  34. How did people clean their teeth in the olden days?
  35. 'The Farewell' highlights tough conversations families face when confronted with death
  36. An invisible government agency produces crucial national security intelligence, but is anyone listening?
  37. Mexican president López Obrador has a woman problem
  38. Western states buy time with a 7-year Colorado River drought plan, but face a hotter, drier future
  39. At least 2% of US public water systems are like Flint's – Americans just don't hear about them
  40. Selecting groceries ahead of time helps some shoppers make healthier choices
  41. 4 questions answered on sex trafficking in the US
  42. The long, bipartisan history of dealing with immigrants harshly
  43. The forgotten history of segregated swimming pools and amusement parks
  44. A booming international movie market is transforming Hollywood
  45. Neuroscience and artificial intelligence can help improve each other
  46. Women are less supportive of space exploration – getting a woman on the Moon might change that
  47. How Congress lost power over trade deals – and why some lawmakers want it back
  48. Physician burnout: Why legal and regulatory systems may need to step in
  49. Climate change is affecting crop yields and reducing global food supplies
  50. Counterfeit alcohol, sometimes containing jet fuel or embalming fluid, is a growing concern for tourists abroad