The Conversation

Spray-on antennas unlock communication of the future

  • Written by Yury Gogotsi, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University
Spraying an antenna onto a flat surface.Drexel University Nanomaterials Lab, CC BY-ND

Hear the word “antenna” and you might think about rabbit ears on the top of an old TV or the wire that picks up radio signals for a car. But an antenna can be much smaller – even invisible. No matter its shape or size, an antenna is crucial for...

Read more: Spray-on antennas unlock communication of the future

¿Desea donar el cambio de la compra? Pedir donaciones benéficas en el supermercado es un buen negocio

  • Written by Benjamin Lawrence, Aziz Hashim Professor of Franchise Entrepreneurship and Associate Professor of Hospitality, Georgia State University
¿Quiere hacer una donación?Shutterstock.com/Jacob Lund

El sistema de donaciones de dinero a varias organizaciones benéficas, a través de supermercados y farmacias, se está convirtiendo en un gran negocio.


Read more: Asking customers to donate when they buy stuff may be good for business


Según Enga...

Read more: ¿Desea donar el cambio de la compra? Pedir donaciones benéficas en el supermercado es un buen...

Why the unemployment rate will never get to zero percent – but it could still go a lot lower

  • Written by Jay L. Zagorsky, Adjunct associate professor, Boston University

The U.S. Labor Department continues to release wonderful news for U.S. workers.

Just this week, on Sept. 20, the agency said that the number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits reached the lowest level in almost 49 years. Unemployment benefits track changes in the number of workers who are laid off by companies. When few companies lay off...

Read more: Why the unemployment rate will never get to zero percent – but it could still go a lot lower

Shrinking the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is a disaster for paleontology

  • Written by P. David Polly, Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Biology, and Anthropology, Indiana University
Landscape of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah, one of the most abundant fossil fields in the world.P. David Polly, 2018, CC BY-ND

In the early 1980s, paleontologists Jeff Eaton and Rich Cifelli started digging for fossils in one of the most inaccessible regions of the United States: the Kaiparowits Plateau of southern...

Read more: Shrinking the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is a disaster for paleontology

Paper-based electronics could fold, biodegrade and be the basis for the next generation of devices

  • Written by Seokheun Choi, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Binghamton University, State University of New York
A foldable, biodegradable battery based on paper and bacteria opens a new opportunity in electronics.Seokheun Choi/Binghamton University, CC BY-ND

It seems like every few months there’s a new cellphone, laptop or tablet that is so exciting people line up around the block to get their hands on it. While the perpetual introduction of new, slight...

Read more: Paper-based electronics could fold, biodegrade and be the basis for the next generation of devices

I acted like a complete jerk to my students just to prove a point

  • Written by Alan Goodboy, Professor, West Virginia University
Antagonistic professors hurt student learning, research shows.Volodymyr Tverdokhlib/www.shutterstock.com

During a recent lecture, I purposefully antagonized students.

I belittled one student by criticizing him in front of others. I favored another student by telling other students they should be more like her. I responded impatiently to questions. I...

Read more: I acted like a complete jerk to my students just to prove a point

Sexual assault among adolescents: 6 facts

  • Written by David Finkelhor, Professor of Sociology, University of New Hampshire
Sexual assault among adolescents is common.

Christine Blasey Ford’s account of allegedly being sexually assaulted by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh when they were teenagers is provoking both informed and uninformed comment from politicians. Still more private conversations about the subject are happening in homes and offices around the...

Read more: Sexual assault among adolescents: 6 facts

The US will have to accept second-class status in the Middle East

  • Written by Gordon Adams, Professor Emeritus, American University School of International Service

You may not have noticed it – the chair that wasn’t there.

The seven-year long Syrian civil war is ending with a government victory, aided by Russia and Iran. Talks to end to the war are accelerating.

Who is at the table in those talks? Russia, Turkey and Iran. Noticeably, not the United States.

The missing U.S. was starkly obvious...

Read more: The US will have to accept second-class status in the Middle East

Caught on camera: The fossa, Madagascar's elusive top predator

  • Written by Asia Murphy, PhD candidate, Pennsylvania State University
Fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox) at the Houston Zoo.Josh Henderson, CC BY-SA

Mention wildlife on Madagascar and the first thing listeners probably picture is the island’s famed lemurs. As many people know, these unique primates are found nowhere else, and are the most endangered group of mammals in the world. But few people realize that...

Read more: Caught on camera: The fossa, Madagascar's elusive top predator

The future of 'golf' may not be on the links

  • Written by Joshua Woods, Associate Professor of Sociology, West Virginia University
To play disc golf, all you need is 20 dollars for a couple of discs, and you're good to go.Jari Hindstroem

Could disc golf become more popular than ball golf by 2028?

Ask disc golfers and they’ll say, “You bet – our sport is growing like crazy.”

But for most Americans, the answer is, “What’s disc golf?” And...

Read more: The future of 'golf' may not be on the links

More Articles ...

  1. Before the fall: How oldsters can avoid one of old age's most dangerous events
  2. Big game days in college football linked with sexual assault
  3. Hurricane kids: What Katrina taught us about saving Puerto Rico's youngest storm victims
  4. Destructive 2018 hail season a sign of things to come
  5. How many Americans really misuse opioids? Why scientists still aren't sure
  6. Why do so many people fall for fake profiles online?
  7. Relaxed environmental regulations heighten risk during natural disasters
  8. Here's how Trump-era politics are affecting worker morale – and what managers can do about it
  9. Should all Nobel Prizes be canceled for a year?
  10. Memo to Kavanaugh's defenders: Passage of time doesn't erase youthful mistakes in the criminal justice system, especially for people of color
  11. El huracán María causó 2.975 muertos en Puerto Rico, pero gran parte del desastre pudo evitarse
  12. One big problem with how Jeff and MacKenzie Bezos are spending a small share of their fortune
  13. The US has become a nation of suburbs
  14. Binge drinking and blackouts: Sobering truths about lost learning for college students
  15. How an ancient Islamic holiday became uniquely Caribbean
  16. Why women – including feminists – are still attracted to 'benevolently sexist' men
  17. What the season of fall – and science – teaches us about life and death
  18. With USB-C, even plugging in can set you up to be hacked
  19. Estas estrategias eficaces en redes sociales impulsan victoria de los políticos ‘anti-establishment’
  20. Puerto Rico has not recovered from Hurricane Maria
  21. Barriers for transgender voters ahead of the 2018 midterm elections
  22. The migration of same-sex couples to the suburbs is shaping the fight for LGBT equality
  23. Sending help where it's needed most after disasters
  24. Trump should wage a war on waste instead of battling the world over trade
  25. Is apple cider vinegar good for you? A doctor weighs in
  26. 5 math skills your child needs to get ready for kindergarten
  27. The Mother of All Demos
  28. In 1968, computers got personal: How the 'mother of all demos' changed the world
  29. Yom Kippur: A time for feasting as well as fasting
  30. Researchers block cocaine craving and addiction with a special skin graft
  31. Cuba propone legalizar el matrimonio gay y las iglesias se atreven a salir en contra
  32. As Cuba backs gay marriage, churches oppose the government's plan
  33. Are today's white kids less racist than their grandparents?
  34. The science, skill – and luck – behind evacuation order calls
  35. Catastrophe overload? Read philosophers and poetry instead of headlines
  36. Federal funding for higher ed comes with strings attached, but is still worth it
  37. Digitizing the vast 'dark data' in museum fossil collections
  38. How the zebrafish got its stripes
  39. Rivers flood regularly during hurricanes, but get less attention than coastlines
  40. ¿Por qué sentimos el olor de la lluvia?
  41. Barrier islands protect coasts from storms, but are vulnerable too
  42. Nuclear reactors in hurricanes: 5 questions answered
  43. Immigrant detention in the US: 4 essential reads
  44. Can Jeff Bezos help the homeless? 4 essential reads
  45. Could coal ash be a viable source of rare-earth metals?
  46. Delacroix at the Met: A retrospective that evokes today's turmoil
  47. Battles over patriotism, Pledge of Allegiance in schools span a century
  48. Ground-level ozone continues to damage health, even at low levels
  49. Death count debates overshadow the real story: Hurricane Maria was partly a human-made disaster
  50. Study shows BPA substitutes may cause same health issues as the original