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After the trial's over, President Trump's impeachment battles could determine who holds real power in the US government

  • Written by Barbara L. McQuade, Professor from Practice, University of Michigan
Cases related to the Trump impeachment may end up at the Supreme Court.ZACH GIBSON/AFP via Getty Images

The legal and constitutional battles sparked by President Trump’s behavior could affect how the U.S. government works for generations, long after the impeachment trial is over.

After the last Senate staffer turns out the lights, major...

Read more: After the trial's over, President Trump's impeachment battles could determine who holds real power...

Gay rights dispute is pulling apart the United Methodist Church, after decades of argument

  • Written by Scott T. Vehstedt, PhD Candidate in American History, American University
The United Methodist Church is facing a schism over LGBT policies.AP Photo/Sid Hastings

The Methodist Church, the largest mainline Protestant denomination in the United States, is headed toward a divorce.

In early January, mediators from across the United Methodist Church proposed a separation plan to split the church into two separate...

Read more: Gay rights dispute is pulling apart the United Methodist Church, after decades of argument

Obesity, second to smoking as the most preventable cause of US deaths, needs new approaches

  • Written by Dana Goldman, Leonard D. Schaeffer Chair and Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, Pharmacy, and Economics, University of Southern California
Social campaigns to address the obesity crisis in America are failing. Lightspring/Shutterstock.com

The opioid crisis and deaths related to e-cigarette use among teenagers have dominated news headlines recently. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 34 people had died as a result of vaping and, in 2017, opioid...

Read more: Obesity, second to smoking as the most preventable cause of US deaths, needs new approaches

Don't be fooled – most independents are partisans too

  • Written by Christopher Devine, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Dayton
The identity that people choose most often is actually 'independent' – not Democratic or Republican.Victor Moussa/Shutterstock.com

Will Donald Trump win reelection in 2020? To find out, you’d think you could just look up whether more Americans are registered as Republicans than Democrats.

But the truth is, it doesn’t really matter...

Read more: Don't be fooled – most independents are partisans too

How Minneapolis made Prince

  • Written by Rashad Shabazz, Associate Professor at the School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University
Prince performs at Minneapolis' First Avenue nightclub in August 1983.Jim Steinfeldt/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

It’s been almost four years since Prince’s death, but fascination about the artist, the man and his mythology endures.

On Jan. 28, Alicia Keys, the Foo Fighters, Usher and several of Prince’s collaborators will be...

Read more: How Minneapolis made Prince

Why it's unclear whether private programs for 'troubled teens' are working

  • Written by Heather E. Mooney, Ph.D. Candidate in Sociology, Wayne State University
The tab for enrolling your child can cost $6,000 a month or more.Photographee.eu/Shutterstock.com

I first became interested in what I’ve learned is called the “troubled teen industry” more than 20 years ago, when my parents sent me away to a program they thought would help me finish high school. At that point I was skipping a lot...

Read more: Why it's unclear whether private programs for 'troubled teens' are working

What is white-nose syndrome in bats?

  • Written by Winifred Frick, Associate Research Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz
Dr. Winifred Frick examines a bat for white-nose syndrome.Alan Hicks, CC BY-ND

Curious Kids is a series for children of all ages. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, send it to curiouskidsus@theconversation.com.


What is white-nose syndrome in bats? – Minti F., age 13, Boston, Massachusetts


Scientists count bats in the...

Read more: What is white-nose syndrome in bats?

Study finds ethics can be taught – in finance, at least

  • Written by Andrew Gordon Sutherland, Ford International Career Development Professor; Associate Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
In 2010, the ethics content of a federal licensing exam for financial advisers was reduced.www.shutterstock.com

Testing investment advisers on their knowledge of ethics can lead to better behavior, new research shows.

According to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, 630,000 financial representatives and investment advisers provide financial...

Read more: Study finds ethics can be taught – in finance, at least

How CEOs, experts and philosophers see the world's biggest risks differently

  • Written by Christopher Michaelson, Professor of Ethics and Business Law, University of St. Thomas
Activist Greta Thunberg was among attendees who want the world's leaders to prioritize fighting climate change. AP Photo/Michael Probst

We live in a world threatened by numerous existential risks that no country or organization can resolve alone, such as climate change, extreme weather and the coronavirus.

But in order to adequately address them, we...

Read more: How CEOs, experts and philosophers see the world's biggest risks differently

Atmospheric river storms can drive costly flooding – and climate change is making them stronger

  • Written by Tom Corringham, Postdoctoral Scholar in Climate, Atmospheric Science and Physical Oceanography, University of California San Diego
Rescue workers sift through debris after a mudslide that destroyed three homes on a hillside in Sausalito, Calif., Feb. 14, 2019, during an atmospheric river storm.AP Photo/Michael Short

Ask people to name the world’s largest river, and most will probably guess that it’s the Amazon, the Nile or the Mississippi. In fact, some of...

Read more: Atmospheric river storms can drive costly flooding – and climate change is making them stronger

More Articles ...

  1. Does impeachment need a crime? Not according to framers of the Constitution
  2. If it's below 40 degrees in South Florida, the forecast calls for falling iguanas
  3. 5 obstacles that stop many students from taking an internship
  4. Why your zodiac sign is probably wrong
  5. In the terrorism fight, Trump has continued a key Obama policy
  6. Winning worker hearts and minds is key to companies achieving their green goals
  7. Are you in danger of catching the coronavirus? 5 questions answered
  8. The serious consequence of exercising too much, too fast
  9. 200 years of exploring Antarctica – the world's coldest, most forbidding and most peaceful continent
  10. When lesbians led the women's suffrage movement
  11. Precedent? Nah, the Senate gets to reinvent its rules in every impeachment
  12. Joaquin Phoenix's lips mocked - here's what everyone should know about cleft lip
  13. Joaquin Phoenix's lips mocked – here's what everyone should know about cleft lip
  14. Reclaman a Cuba por detención prolongada de un disidente – pero ¿es José Daniel Ferrer un prisionero político?
  15. African Americans take on more debt for grad school – but the payoff is also bigger
  16. US and Cuba spar over jailed dissident – but is José Daniel Ferrer really a political prisoner?
  17. A brief history of black names, from Perlie to Latasha
  18. Why California is banning chlorpyrifos, a widely-used pesticide: 5 questions answered
  19. Victorian efforts to export animals to new worlds failed, mostly
  20. Silicon Valley's latest fad is dopamine fasting – and that may not be as crazy as it sounds
  21. Is it OK for teens to drink coffee?
  22. The dramatic dismissal of a landmark youth climate lawsuit might not close the book on that case
  23. Snakes could be the original source of the new coronavirus outbreak in China
  24. Can capitalism solve capitalism’s problems?
  25. Ozzy Osbourne has a type of Parkinson's disease called Parkin: A neurologist explains
  26. How Iran's military outsources its cyberthreat forces
  27. If the Romance Writers of America can implode over racism, no group is safe
  28. What a bundle of buzzing bees can teach engineers about robotic materials
  29. Stoneflies and mayflies, canaries of our streams
  30. When politicians turn immigration into a 'crisis,' they hurt their own people
  31. Snacks after youth sports add more calories than kids burn while playing, study says
  32. Is secondhand screen time the new secondhand smoking?
  33. Where are the Hispanic executives?
  34. Is it ethical to show Holocaust images?
  35. Giving is changing as philanthropy faces more scrutiny
  36. Vital Hasson, the Jew who worked for the Nazis, hunted down refugees and tore apart families in WWII Greece
  37. There's more than one good way to teach kids how to read
  38. Iceland didn't hunt any whales in 2019 – and public appetite for whale meat is fading
  39. Veterans, refugees and victims of war crimes are all vulnerable to PTSD
  40. Even planets have their (size) limits
  41. What to think when you're thinking about impeachment: 5 essential reads
  42. Native people did not use fire to shape New England's landscape
  43. Impeachment trial senators swear an oath aimed at guarding 'against malice, falsehood, and evasion'
  44. Bill de Blasio's bagel gaffe and the fraught politics of food
  45. 'Lennon Walls' herald a sticky-note revolution in Hong Kong
  46. How a heritage of black preaching shaped MLK's voice in calling for justice
  47. Why bosses should let employees surf the web at work
  48. Identifying aquatic plants with drones could be the key to reducing a parasitic infection in people
  49. What is a bar mitzvah?
  50. I asked people why they don't vote, and this is what they told me