The Conversation




From gay Nazis to 'we're here, we're queer': A century of arguing about gay pride

  • Written by Laurie Marhoefer, Assistant Professor of History, University of Washington

This month, hundreds of thousands of people around the world will join gay pride marches in cities big and small. In many cities, pride marches are controversial. In some – like Moscow – they are even banned. But for many people in North America, parts of Europe, Latin America and elsewhere, attending the local pride march has become...

Read more: From gay Nazis to 'we're here, we're queer': A century of arguing about gay pride

Are LGBT Americans actually reaping the benefits of marriage?

  • Written by Jayn Goldsen, Research Study Supervisor, University of Washington

For decades, researchers have studied the benefits of marriage, finding that married people are likely to be healthier, wealthier and wiser than their unmarried peers.

But these studies reflected those who were allowed to marry.

Only recently – when states started passing laws guaranteeing same-sex couples the right to marry – could...

Read more: Are LGBT Americans actually reaping the benefits of marriage?

Teaching machines to understand – and summarize – text

  • Written by Karuna Pande Joshi, Research Associate Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
imageCan artificial intelligence help us stop drowning in paperwork?Jiw Ingka/shutterstock.com

We humans are swamped with text. It’s not just news and other timely information: Regular people are drowning in legal documents. The problem is so bad we mostly ignore it. Every time a person uses a store’s loyalty rewards card or connects to an...

Read more: Teaching machines to understand – and summarize – text

Drew Faust and old, white men: The changing role of university presidents

  • Written by Jason Lane, Chair and Professor of Educational Policy and Leadership, Executive Director of SUNY's Strategic, Academic, and Innovative Leadership (SAIL) Institute, and Co-Director of the Cross-Border Education Research Team, University at Albany, State Un

If your perception of higher education is that it’s led by aging white males, you’re right. According to a report released this week by the American Council on Education (ACE), the average college president in 2016 was a 62-year-old married white male with a doctorate.

One recent exception was Drew Faust, who was appointed Harvard...

Read more: Drew Faust and old, white men: The changing role of university presidents

Why the latest wave of terrorism will get worse before it gets better

  • Written by Bruce Newsome, Lecturer in International Relations, University of California, Berkeley

The latest attacks in London and Manchester – like last year’s attacks in Orlando, Florida and St. Cloud, Minnesota – epitomize what I call the newest form of terrorism.

The newest terrorists aim to kill as many people as possible, as frequently as possible, as horrifically as possible, intimately, suicidally, with the most...

Read more: Why the latest wave of terrorism will get worse before it gets better

Why cash remains sacred in American churches

  • Written by James Hudnut-Beumler, Professor of American Religious History, Vanderbilt University
imageWhy do people need cash in churches?Billion Photos/Shutterstock

On Tuesday, June 27, it will be 50 years since the first automated cash dispenser – which came to be known as an automated teller machine (ATM) – was inaugurated in London.

Just thinking about it brings a smile to my face. I belong to the generation who stood 45 minutes to...

Read more: Why cash remains sacred in American churches

Even ugly animals can win hearts and dollars to save them from extinction

  • Written by Diogo Veríssimo, David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellow, Johns Hopkins University
imageIt can be easier to raise money to aid animals like these African elephants than species that are more threatened with extinction but get humans less excited. www.shutterstock.com

The Earth is home to millions of species, but you wouldn’t know it from the media’s obsession with only a few dozen animals like tigers and gorillas.

This...

Read more: Even ugly animals can win hearts and dollars to save them from extinction

Government action isn't enough for climate change. The private sector can cut billions of tons of carbon

  • Written by Michael Vandenbergh, David Daniels Allen Distinguished Chair of Law, Vanderbilt University
imageBusinesses can make up for inaction on climate by government by investing in energy and fuel efficiency. Walmart/flickr, CC BY-SA

With President Trump’s announcement to pull the United States out of the Paris Agreement, many other countries around the world – and cities and states within the U.S. – are stepping up their...

Read more: Government action isn't enough for climate change. The private sector can cut billions of tons of...

Marine Le Pen didn't win over women. Can anyone on the far right?

  • Written by Malliga Och, Assistant Professor of Global Studies and Languages, Idaho State University
imageA Le Pen campaign rally in Villepinte, France on May 1, 2017. REUTERS/Charles Platiau

Marine Le Pen has gone from potentially being elected the first female president of France to barely keeping her party alive.

In early May, Le Pen was one of two candidates to advance to the second round of the presidential election. Two months later, her party...

Read more: Marine Le Pen didn't win over women. Can anyone on the far right?

Can yoga be Christian?

  • Written by Andrea Jain, Associate Professor of Religion, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
imageJulie Pimentel, CC BY-NC

Invocations of Jesus, images of the cross and biblical scripture are unlikely to be what we envision when we think of yoga.

Yoga is typically seen as either a Hindu practice or, more recently and popularly, “spiritual but not religious” or, even more commonly, a form of wellness or fitness.

As the author of “...

Read more: Can yoga be Christian?

More Articles ...

  1. What happened to the openly gay athlete?
  2. Challenging the status quo in mathematics: Teaching for understanding
  3. Reverse engineering mysterious 500-million-year-old fossils that confound our tree of life
  4. ATMs dispense more than money: The dirt and dope that's on your cash
  5. Most expensive race in House history turns out nearly 58 percent of Georgia district's voters
  6. Fixing a toxic culture like Uber's requires more than just a new CEO
  7. Why there are costs to moral outrage
  8. Will guilty verdict in teen texting suicide case lead to new laws on end-of-life issues?
  9. How secure are today's ATMs? 5 questions answered
  10. When – and why – did people first start using money?
  11. Amazon dives into groceries with Whole Foods: Five questions answered
  12. Julius Caesar in our times
  13. American slavery: Separating fact from myth
  14. How US gun control compares to the rest of the world
  15. Even though genetic information is available, doctors may be ignoring important clinical clues
  16. Do happy faces or sad faces raise more money?
  17. Does hookup culture differ on Catholic campuses?
  18. Once at the vanguard of national policy, California plays defense under Trump
  19. Trump nods to Cuban exiles, rolls back ties: Experts react
  20. Is lead in the US food supply decreasing our IQ?
  21. Can tiny Qatar keep defying its powerful neighbors? It may be up to Washington
  22. How a journalism class is teaching middle schoolers to fight fake news
  23. The Fresh Air Fund's complicated racial record
  24. Was Trump's 'hope' Comey's command? We asked a language expert
  25. Navigating the tricky waters of being a stepdad
  26. In Tupac's life, the struggles and triumphs of a generation
  27. What Sharia law means: Five questions answered
  28. Why treating breast cancer with less may be more
  29. From the Pentagon Papers to Trump: How the government gained the upper hand against leakers
  30. Want to understand the British election? Look online and listen to grime
  31. The UK's plan to deny terrorists 'safe spaces' online would make us all less safe in the long run
  32. As Fed 'returns to normal,' is the risk of recession rising?: Experts react
  33. Silent partners: Are earthworms creating pathways for invasive plants?
  34. Dear students, what you post can wreck your life
  35. Did Sessions and Trump conspire to obstruct justice?
  36. Helping or hacking? Engineers and ethicists must work together on brain-computer interface technology
  37. Why the South still has such high HIV rates
  38. The rise – and possible fall – of the graphing calculator
  39. Matchmaker, matchmaker, find me a school: College admissions in China
  40. Climate change is shrinking the Colorado River
  41. What went wrong with the F-35, Lockheed Martin's Joint Strike Fighter?
  42. Cities can jump-start climate progress by plugging in their vehicles
  43. Do poor people eat more junk food than wealthier Americans?
  44. Future of unions in balance as Trump prepares to reshape national labor board
  45. Are jokesters screwing up our data on gay teenagers?
  46. Can people 'like me' go to college? Inequality and dreams of higher ed
  47. Is Trump's definition of 'the rule of law' the same as the US Constitution's?
  48. Before the digital age, how religious groups increased the numbers in their order
  49. The understated affection of fathers
  50. When politicians cherry-pick data and disregard facts, what should we academics do?

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