News Pronto

The Conversation

New DNA analysis says your pooch's ancestors were Central Asian wolves

  • Written by The Conversation
imageYou've come a long way, baby.moggafogga, CC BY-NC-ND

Dogs' origin story goes something like this: sometime between 16,000 and 30,000 years ago, there were some stressed-out hungry wolves whose hunting territory had been encroached upon by humans. Luckily, these wolves were resourceful and they noticed human beings have a tendency to leave delicious...

Read more: New DNA analysis says your pooch's ancestors were Central Asian wolves

We're hiring!

  • Written by The Conversation
imageTCUS

We’re looking for two dynamic and experienced journalists to join The Conversation team based in Boston.

Are you passionate about local and community media, excited by ideas journalism and entrepreneurial? The Project Manager - Newspaper Outreach will lead a pilot initiative funded by the Knight Foundation aimed at bringing the content of...

Read more: We're hiring!

Milwaukee case could encourage gun stores to reduce illegal sales

  • Written by The Conversation
imageSurveillance video of the straw purchase going down.

On October 13, a Milwaukee jury awarded two police officers US$5.7 million in a lawsuit against a gun store that sold the weapon that was used to shoot them.

The case comes 10 years after Congress immunized gun sellers from civil liability arising out of criminal misuse of a firearm.

With the...

Read more: Milwaukee case could encourage gun stores to reduce illegal sales

Learning from others, Michigan considers best options for future fracking

  • Written by The Conversation
imageA fracking well in Pennsylvania, which saw rapid and sometimes-problematic spread of natural gas development. wcn247/flickr, CC BY-NC

There is significant momentum behind natural gas extraction in the United States, with many states viewing it as an opportunity to foster economic growth, move toward domestic energy security and create a cleaner...

Read more: Learning from others, Michigan considers best options for future fracking

Does a shorter week help kids with their learning?

  • Written by The Conversation
imageShould schools rethink their schedule?Lower Columbia College (LCC), CC BY-NC-ND

How would you react if you were told that your local public school planned to change the schedule from the traditional Monday-through-Friday model to a schedule that contained four longer school days? Would you worry about long days for young children, their academic...

Read more: Does a shorter week help kids with their learning?

Does China care that it was left out of the Trans-Pacific trade club?

  • Written by The Conversation
imageChina didn't get a seat at the TPP table (even in Beijing).Reuters

Earlier this month, the US Trade Representative announced the completion of negotiations on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Despite the agreement’s far-reaching scope, some commentators have heavily criticized its exclusion of China.

The disappointment is understandable....

Read more: Does China care that it was left out of the Trans-Pacific trade club?

When it comes to baseball's ethnic tensions, the problems run deeper than bat flips

  • Written by The Conversation
imageToronto Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista flips his bat after hitting the go-ahead three-run home run in Game 5 of the ALDS.USA Today Sports/Reuters

In Game 5 of the American League Division Series (ALDS), Toronto Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista faced Texas Rangers reliever Sam Dyson in the seventh inning with two runners on base, two outs and...

Read more: When it comes to baseball's ethnic tensions, the problems run deeper than bat flips

Scientist at work: observing termite behaviors, personalities – and souls?

  • Written by The Conversation
imageTiny termites build mega mounds.Scott Turner, Author provided

In Afrikaans, they are called rysmiere, literally “rice ants,” although their name is more commonly rendered into English as “white ants.” They are not ants, though; they’re not even closely related to the ants. In fact, their nearest insect relatives are...

Read more: Scientist at work: observing termite behaviors, personalities – and souls?

Clinton's anti-drugmaker rhetoric may win votes, but does it threaten our long-term health?

  • Written by The Conversation
imageBashing drugmakers can be an easy way to score political points.Reuters

At Tuesday’s Democratic debate, the candidates were asked to name the enemies they’re most proud of making.

Front-runner Hillary Clinton’s answer? Drug companies (along with the National Rifle Association, “the Iranians” and Republicans).

What did...

Read more: Clinton's anti-drugmaker rhetoric may win votes, but does it threaten our long-term health?

More Articles ...

  1. On global campuses, academic freedom has its limits
  2. Russian cooperation with Iran and Iraq has broader consequences than saving Assad
  3. China's slowdown is a sign of middle-class gains, not a reason for panic
  4. We are entering a new era of migration – and not just for people
  5. How the GOP circus act compromises American Democracy
  6. A 'Royal Rumble' in Syria means yet more chaos for civilians
  7. Why disciplining kids can be so tricky for parents and teachers
  8. US losing its dominance in global higher education market
  9. Will the Supreme Court kill the smart grid?
  10. Swinging between extremes in giving scientific credit where credit is due
  11. Brains work via their genes just as much as their neurons
  12. Should movie studios be worried about Netflix's first feature film?
  13. Craft chocolate shakes up industry as its sweet season begins
  14. Scholars on the Democratic debate: Hillary wins, Bernie hits a nerve
  15. Is it time America finally took a chance on Syria's refugees?
  16. Building a case, over time, for adding sustainability to nutritional guidelines
  17. Why more scientists are needed in the public square
  18. The CNN Democratic debate will be another circus
  19. Men and women biased about studies of STEM gender bias – in opposite directions
  20. If you think your emails are private, think again
  21. Meet Doc Savage, the most famous superhero you've never heard of
  22. Hydraulic fracturing components in Marcellus groundwater likely from surface operations, not wells
  23. Brain activity is as unique – and identifying – as a fingerprint
  24. Are some kids really smarter just because they know more words?
  25. Pathogen-carrying invasive fish from China threatens US waterways
  26. Why some religious Americans see same-sex marriage as a threat
  27. Svetlana Alexievich captured the psyche – and trauma – of a Soviet people and nation
  28. TPP's new battle lines may pose threat to world's biggest trade deal
  29. Could the peace deal in Colombia be a model for other conflicts?
  30. Are assigned readings from women professors different?
  31. As Syrian refugee crisis spreads to Europe, lessons from Turkey
  32. Why only now – after 51 years – war is ending in Colombia
  33. What happens to men who stay abstinent until marriage?
  34. Denis Mukwege deserves the Nobel Peace Prize for his work in Congo
  35. Chemistry Nobel DNA research lays foundation for new ways to fight cancer
  36. The universe’s most miraculous molecule
  37. Japan may have tricky time passing TPP after making concessions on rice, beef
  38. Want a 'free lunch'? Invest in America's infrastructure
  39. A carbon tax in waiting: we're not adapting as fast as climate is changing
  40. Arne Duncan's legacy: growing influence of a network of private actors on public education
  41. They won a Nobel for what? Why good science communication counts
  42. Is the Kunduz hospital strike a war crime? Don't jump to conclusions
  43. Why wearing sagging pants on a college campus becomes a criminal offense
  44. The new battleground for same-sex couples is equal rights for their kids
  45. The psychological origins of procrastination – and how we can stop putting things off
  46. Australia’s war on feral cats: shaky science, missing ethics
  47. We may have cinched TPP, but is US trade a lost cause?
  48. How neutrinos, which barely exist, just ran off with another Nobel Prize
  49. The secret Maoist Chinese operation that conquered malaria – and won a Nobel
  50. Why women aren't getting long-acting contraception when they need it most