ALL ABOUT CLOSED RHINOPLASTY

Closed rhinoplasty is an operation without any external incisions. Such an operation is considered perhaps the most serious of all possible and requires prolonged postoperative observation. The main...

News Company - avatar News Company

Tips To Create Better Brand Videos For A Kickass SEO And Better Rank On SERPs

If you have been studying your competitors and market closely, you would have noticed that the importance of video content marketing for branding and digital marketing is increasing. However, not eve...

News Company - avatar News Company

HOW TO MAKE YOUR HOUSE SMELL GOOD NATURALLY

Almost everything that you share about your personality and lifestyle is to make an impression nowadays. The saying that the first impression is the last certainly has come a long way. What brands ...

News Company - avatar News Company

Stocking up to prepare for a crisis isn't 'panic buying'. It's actually a pretty rational choice

Recent days have brought reports of shoppers clearing out supermarket shelves from Wuhan and Hong Kong to Singapore and Milan in response to the spread of coronavirus. This behaviour is often describ...

David A. Savage, Associate Professor of  Behavioural Economics , Newcastle Business School, University of Newcastle - avatar David A. Savage, Associate Professor of Behavioural Economics , Newcastle Business School, University of Newcastle

Albanese says we can't replace steelmaking coal. But we already have green alternatives

ShutterstockDespite a wealth of evidence to the contrary, some still propagate the myth that the world will need Australian coal for decades to come. Last weekend Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese jo...

Dominique Hes, Senior Lecturer in Sustainable Architecture, University of Melbourne - avatar Dominique Hes, Senior Lecturer in Sustainable Architecture, University of Melbourne

We groom dogs in our own image: the cuter they are, the harder we fall

Hannah Lim/UnsplashAustralians are slightly obsessed with our dogs. But are we obsessed enough to watch a reality doggy makeover show?The reality makeover concept has a long history, from Top Model to...

Tiffani J. Howell, Research Fellow, School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University - avatar Tiffani J. Howell, Research Fellow, School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University

Thousands of city trees have been lost to development, when we need them more than ever

Climate change is on everyone’s lips this summer. We’ve had bushfires, smoke haze, heatwaves, flooding, mass protests and a National Climate Emergency Summit, all within a few months. The ...

Thami Croeser, Research Officer, Centre for Urban Research, RMIT University - avatar Thami Croeser, Research Officer, Centre for Urban Research, RMIT University

4 myths about polycystic ovary syndrome – and why they're wrong

ShutterstockPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common hormonal condition. When using the definition supported by the international guidelines, it affects just under one in six young Australian wome...

Tessa Copp, PhD candidate, University of Sydney - avatar Tessa Copp, PhD candidate, University of Sydney

Natural disasters increase inequality. Recovery funding may make things worse

ShutterstockMy team and I have analysed the incomes of people affected by some of Australia’s worst bushfires, floods and cyclones in the past two decades. Our results are disheartening. We&rsqu...

Mehmet Ulubasoglu, Professor of Economics, Head of the Department of Economics and Director of the Centre for Energy, the Environment and Natural Disasters, Deakin University - avatar Mehmet Ulubasoglu, Professor of Economics, Head of the Department of Economics and Director of the Centre for Energy, the Environment and Natural Disasters, Deakin University

Coercive control is a key part of domestic violence. So why isn't it a crime across Australia?

ShutterstockThe recent killing of Hannah Clarke and her three children by her estranged husband has raised national attention to the types of behaviour that might lead to such a horrific crime, and ho...

Paul McGorrery, PhD Candidate in Criminal Law, Deakin University - avatar Paul McGorrery, PhD Candidate in Criminal Law, Deakin University

Vital Signs: a 3-point plan to reach net-zero emissions by 2050

ShutterstockEvery January Larry Fink, the head of the world’s largest funds manager, BlackRock, sends a letter to the chief executives of major public companies.This year’s letter focused...

The Conversation - avatar The Conversation

Requiring firms to only sell financial products we can use is good, but not enough

ShutterstockThe government’s financial system inquiry, on which I sat, reported five years ago.It recommended that the creators of financial products be subject to a design and distribution obli...

The Conversation - avatar The Conversation

¿Cómo prepararnos para el coronavirus? 3 preguntas y respuestas

Alex Azar, el secretario de salud pública en Estados Unidos, presenta en el Senado sobre el coronavirus, 25 de febrero, 2020. AP Photo/J. Scott ApplewhiteNota del editor: Las autoridades de Sal...

Aubree Gordon, Professor of Public Health, University of Michigan - avatar Aubree Gordon, Professor of Public Health, University of Michigan

How socialism became un-American through the Ad Council’s propaganda campaigns

Bernie Sanders was asked at a CNN-sponsored town hall about socialism.CNN screenshotBernie Sanders has emerged as the Democratic front-runner in the race for the presidential nomination. Yet even some...

Oana Godeanu-Kenworthy, Associate Teaching Professor of American Studies, Miami University - avatar Oana Godeanu-Kenworthy, Associate Teaching Professor of American Studies, Miami University

imageIn lots of simple ways parents can help their kids understand and enjoy maths. Shutterstock

Teaching maths concepts has long been considered the domain of the classroom teacher, with many parents often feeling unable to help their kids develop this skill. However, parents already do many things with their kids that can encourage mathematical thinking and help them see the relevance of mathematics in their everyday lives.

Cultivating this sense of relevance and interest in mathematics has been shown to be a key contributor to a child’s future success in this area. Here are some opportunities for developing mathematical thinking, which parents and kids can enjoy together.

Out and about

imageHand the map to the kids on your summer holiday.Shutterstock

With school holidays around the corner, many families will be taking trips to the coast or interstate to see Nan and Pop. This break gives parents great opportunities to engage their kids in different types of mathematical thinking.

Working out how many kilometres you will travel is an easy way to practise computation skills and develops an interest in map reading. Another calculation might be how far you can travel on one tank of fuel, then finding a place on the map to stop and fill up.

Older kids can be in charge of planning overnight stops after working out how far you can travel in one day. Challenge them by adding extra information:

If the speed limit is 100km, what is the latest time we can leave to arrive by 4pm?

This encourages them to think about the question and plan a method for finding a solution.

In the garden

Kids love getting dirty and playing in the garden. Parents can harness this enthusiasm and develop math skills at the same time. Spatial awareness is used when adding plants to the garden. Estimating the positions so the plants are evenly spaced is something we all do - why not give this job to your child?

imageHow far apart should the trees be? And how deep the holes?Shutterstock

Estimating skills are also used when digging the hole for the plant. Determining how deep it needs to be is often calculated through guess and check, an identified problem-solving strategy.

Kids with understandings of multiplication could use an array to plan the positioning of carrots in the veggie patch. With parental supervision, older kids can apply their knowledge of ratios when making liquid fertiliser - one part plant food to three parts water.

In the kitchen

Getting the kids in the kitchen is a favourite holiday activity for many families. The pride and enjoyment kids get from baking cookies or helping prepare the family meal are invaluable. Mathematical knowledge and processes are a fundamental part of this experience.

Measuring quantities accurately is crucial if you want the cake to rise. Actively discussing this with kids brings the importance of this math concept to life.

Develop curiosity by presenting problem-solving opportunities:

We need 1 cup of sugar, but we have only these ¼ and 1/3 cups to measure with. What can we do?

And then ask again:

Great idea! What else could we do?

imageHow much pastry do we need for four pasties?Shutterstock

Knowing that there is often more than one way to solve a problem provides comfort for those who think in different ways. Using scales to weigh ingredients reinforces the skill of reading these numbers and draws on knowledge of decimals. Calculating when the food will be ready uses knowledge of time, but also encourages basic number strategies, like counting by 5s, to be practised:

The recipe says ‘chill for 30 minutes’. It’s 11.50am now, when will it be ready?

Fractional concepts are developed when cutting the cake into equal parts. Every child wants their fair share of that chocolate cake!

At the shops

When you’re out at the shops, there are plenty of ways to get kids thinking about and exploring maths. Simple counting exercises with young kids are a great way to reinforce early number concepts like number sequences and cardinality:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5. We have 5 apples in the bag.

Another number concept easily practised at the shops is comparison:

Do we have more apples or oranges?

imageHow much change will you get if you buy 10 apples?Shutterstock

As parents, we often choose the item that represents better value by comparing the “price per 100 gram” - verbalising your thinking helps kids to refine their own mental processes. Budgeting, adding monetary values and calculating change are all skills that benefit from practice in a real-life situation.

Giving older kids $10 and a small shopping list develops these skills as well as fostering a sense of independence. The post-Christmas sales give kids some purposeful reasons to apply knowledge of percentages, if only to convince you that new toy is a real bargain!

Parents can easily use everyday experiences to reinforce and develop mathematical skills and support their kid’s learning of this important subject area. Showing how maths is used in daily tasks provides the perfect balance for the formal learning of the classroom. Mathematics is an area where both teacher and parent input is necessary.

image

Kylie Robson does not work for, consult to, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has no relevant affiliations.

Read more http://theconversation.com/how-parents-can-help-their-kids-understand-and-enjoy-maths-34698