Protect Your Business From All Kinds Of Harm With This Advice

When you own a business, making sure that it is safe should be one of your top priorities. But, it is not always easy to know the kind of things that you need to do to make this happen. Don’t worry th...

News Company - avatar News Company

Expect tax cuts and an emptying of the cupboards in a budget cleanout as the billions roll in

Prime Minister Morrison and Treasurer Frydenberg will do their best to leave the cupboard bare next Tuesday while still delivering a budget surplus in 2019-20.ShutterstockIt has been just over three m...

Warren Hogan, Industry Professor, University of Technology Sydney - avatar Warren Hogan, Industry Professor, University of Technology Sydney

Morrison flags new laws to stop social media platforms being 'weaponised'

Scott Morrison is foreshadowing tough new criminal laws to crack down on social media companies which fail to quickly remove footage like that streamed by the gunman in the New Zealand massacre.Under ...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

Australian political journalists might be part of a ‘Canberra bubble’, but they engage the public too

Australian journalists often use Twitter to comment on the issues of the day.Nina Maile Gordon/The Conversation, CC BY-NC-NDThe federal election is fast approaching – less than 100 days away in ...

Axel Bruns, Professor, Creative Industries, Queensland University of Technology - avatar Axel Bruns, Professor, Creative Industries, Queensland University of Technology

A new twist in the elusive quest for the origins of the word 'bogan' leads to Melbourne's Xavier College

Drawing of a 'bogan doll' which featured in a 1984 edition of a student-produced Xavier College magazine Sursum Corda.Author providedBogan is the most significant word to be created in Australian Engl...

Bruce Moore, Honorary Associate Professor in the School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics, Australian National University - avatar Bruce Moore, Honorary Associate Professor in the School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics, Australian National University

Massacre is now part of Christchurch's identity, so how does a city rise above that?

Christchurch has a challenging new aspect to its identity. The city is now inextricably associated with the March 15 mass shootings at two mosques. So how does a city come to terms with and recover fr...

Will Rifkin, Chair in Applied Regional Economics and Director, Hunter Research Foundation Centre, University of Newcastle - avatar Will Rifkin, Chair in Applied Regional Economics and Director, Hunter Research Foundation Centre, University of Newcastle

Schools are asking students to bring digital devices to class, but are they actually being used?

Not everyone has a digital device to bring to school.from shutterstock.comIt’s been over ten years since Kevin Rudd’s Digital Education Revolution placed small laptops (also called Rudd-to...

Nicola F. Johnson, Associate Professor of Digital Technologies in Education, Edith Cowan University - avatar Nicola F. Johnson, Associate Professor of Digital Technologies in Education, Edith Cowan University

Older people are more digitally savvy, but aged care providers need to keep up

Moving into aged care can affect a person’s ability to remain connected to their local community, but most aged care facilities don't provide access to digital devices.from www.shutterstock.com...

Dr Wendy Wrapson, Senior Research Fellow, Auckland University of Technology - avatar Dr Wendy Wrapson, Senior Research Fellow, Auckland University of Technology

Pets and owners - you can learn a lot about one by studying the other

The personality of a pet owner can help a veterinarian understand the health and welfare of the pet.Shutterstock/PM ProductionThere’s an old saying that pets and their owners become more similar...

Paul McGreevy, Professor of Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare Science, University of Sydney - avatar Paul McGreevy, Professor of Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare Science, University of Sydney

Shorten to announce Labor's 'living wage' plan but without an amount or timing

Bill Shorten will unveil on Tuesday a process to have the Fair Work Commission phase in a “living wage”. But he will not say what it should be as a proportion of the median wage, or how lo...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

Health check: can eating certain foods make you smarter?

Green vegetables, nuts and berries are among the foods that could improve our brain function.From shutterstock.comTrying to keep up with what constitutes a “healthy” diet can be exhausting...

Margaret Morris, Professor of Pharmacology, Head of Pharmacology, UNSW - avatar Margaret Morris, Professor of Pharmacology, Head of Pharmacology, UNSW

A skilful and stirring one-man treatment of George Orwell’s Animal Farm

Renato Musolino is the beating heart of a new production of Animal Farm.James HartleyReview: Animal Farm, State Theatre Company of South AustraliaIn a new one-man production, Renato Musolino brings Ge...

Lisa Harper Campbell, Lecturer in Drama, Flinders University - avatar Lisa Harper Campbell, Lecturer in Drama, Flinders University

Expect tax cuts and an emptying of the cupboards in a budget cleanout as the billions roll in

Prime Minister Morrison and Treasurer Frydenberg will do their best to leave the cupboard bare next Tuesday while still delivering a budget surplus in 2019-20.ShutterstockIt has been just over three m...

The Conversation - avatar The Conversation

A chess program helped this 8-year-old raise $240,000 and get his family out of a homeless shelter – here's what to look for in a chess program for your child

Third-grader Tanitoluwa Adewumi was crowned as a New York State Scholastic chess champion on March 10.GoFundMeBefore he won the primary (K-3) championship section of the New York State Scholastic Cham...

Alexey W. Root, Lecturer in Education, University of Texas at Dallas - avatar Alexey W. Root, Lecturer in Education, University of Texas at Dallas

The promise and peril of the Dominican baseball pipeline

Boys practice baseball at a park in San Antonio de Guerra, a small municipality in the Dominican Republic.Reuters/Ricardo RojasLatinos will comprise about 30 percent of Major League Baseball rosters o...

Rob Ruck, Professor of History, University of Pittsburgh - avatar Rob Ruck, Professor of History, University of Pittsburgh

Why the Vatican needs to open its archives on Pope Pius XII

Pope Pius XII.AP PhotoPope Francis announced recently that, in 2020, the Vatican will open to researchers its archival materials related to Pius XII, who served as pope from 1939 to 1958. The Vatican ...

Alan Avery-Peck, Kraft-Hiatt Professor in Judaic Studies, College of the Holy Cross - avatar Alan Avery-Peck, Kraft-Hiatt Professor in Judaic Studies, College of the Holy Cross

Saudi women are going to college, running for office and changing the conservative country

Saudi Arabia is a notoriously difficult place to be a woman.The kingdom enforces a strict interpretation of Islamic law that sees the separation of men and women as a defining aspect of an Islamic soc...

Alainna Liloia, Graduate Associate, Ph.D. Student, University of Arizona - avatar Alainna Liloia, Graduate Associate, Ph.D. Student, University of Arizona

Why Trump's recognition of the Golan Heights as Israeli territory matters

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, center, Republican U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, left, and U.S. Ambassador to Israel David Friedman, right, in the Israeli-held Golan Heights on March 11, 2019Ro...

Dina Badie, Associate Professor of Politics and International Studies, Centre College - avatar Dina Badie, Associate Professor of Politics and International Studies, Centre College

Despite consumer worries, the future of aviation will be more automated

Human pilots, surrounded by automation.Sorbis/Shutterstock.comIn the wake of the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines crashes of Boeing 737 Max planes, people are thinking about how much of their air trave...

Stephen Rice, Associate Professor of Human Factors, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - avatar Stephen Rice, Associate Professor of Human Factors, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

We need to stop conflating Islam with terrorism

The Christchurch terrorist attack has shown us that we need to address the threat posed by far-right extremism to our ideals of peaceful social cooperation in a multicultural society. Unfortunately, i...

Nicolas Pirsoul, Sessional lecturer in Middle Eastern Politics, Australian Catholic University - avatar Nicolas Pirsoul, Sessional lecturer in Middle Eastern Politics, Australian Catholic University

Huawei exposes critical weaknesses. We need the infrastructure to engage with China

The European Commission has decided to ignore US calls that its allies keep Chinese tech giant Huawei away from significant telecommunications infrastructure. Britain, France and Germany had already m...

Alice de Jonge, Senior Lecturer, International Law; Asian Business Law, Monash University - avatar Alice de Jonge, Senior Lecturer, International Law; Asian Business Law, Monash University

From Mahometan to Kiwi Muslim: history of NZ's Muslim population

New Zealand Muslims have come from several parts of the world, including Pacific Islands, Asian countries, the Middle East and Africa.AAP/Martin Hunter, CC BY-SAMuslims make up just over 1% of New Zea...

Eva Nisa, Lecturer in Religious Studies, Victoria University of Wellington - avatar Eva Nisa, Lecturer in Religious Studies, Victoria University of Wellington

Plant Hire For Small Businesses

All companies face challenges. However, small businesses face a unique set of challenges. From restricted resources to client dependency, there are various hurdles you need to overcome if your busines...

News Company - avatar News Company

imageTake note: how does a typing on a laptop stack up to handwriting?Ed Yourdon/Flickr, CC BY-NC-SA

Two people walk into a seminar: one takes photos, video and an audio recording of the presentation, while the other takes hand-written notes. Which person do you think will better recall the information?

The former can use their digital notes to create something new that builds on the topic, the latter – not so easy.

Yet we still keep reading reports, such as one recently in New Scientist, which suggest that writing notes on paper gives a person a definite advantage in terms of remembering content. That report was based in part on an article in Psychological Science on the advantages written notes have over those typed on laptops.

The argument has been around for many years and is usually based on the idea that handwriting is slow and deliberate which allows the reader a deeper understanding of ideas and information, and therefore a better ability to remember it.

That, so the argument goes, is at odds with digitally recording ideas which typically is a quick, haphazard action that limits understanding and therefore recall.

Similar arguments are made over our ability to remember things that we read from a screen, such as a smartphone, tablet or e-reader, as opposed to a paper-printed form.

My question, though, is should memorising information still be a priority?

Remember back when …

Time shapes knowledge and how we work with it. If it didn’t, we’d still be waiting on those handwritten books produced at the monastery. Important changes have emerged regarding the ideas and information available to us, and the ways we can engage with them that are worth considering.

imageWriting things down was once considered a bad move that would lead to poorer memories.Flickr/Walters Art Museum Illuminated Manuscripts, CC BY-NC-SA

We now have more information available to us than ever. There’s almost an infinite number of ideas and resources available at the tip of our keyboard, and the information is not just presented in writing.

Digital technology allows a range of visual, audio and word based information and ideas. On a daily basis we can access podcasts, vlogs, videos, audio recordings and animations to name just a few.

In addition, the interactive aspect of screen-based content means that we can do more with the information and ideas than just read them. We are reading more than ever (three times more since the 1980s) but interactive components allow us to work with and develop information in many different ways.

It’s common for children today to be able to create a multimodal presentation for a school project which has writing, images, video, sound, animation features and hyperlinks to websites. The days of photocopying information for a project and gluing it to cardboard are long gone.

Against this backdrop, the question of whether we should be expected to, or even need to remember large amounts of information to develop knowledge becomes more complex.

Deciding what we need to remember

There are of course times when we need to remember information but there are many more times when we do not – our smartphone usually helps us with whatever we need. Both standpoints have their value depending on the circumstance.

We need to remember things such as mum’s birthday, things that are beneficial to our health and well being and those things that can cause us harm such as certain poisonous things, or how to get from home to work (although in all cases we can let technology remind us). At times we also need to understand some ideas deeply and have a very good memory of them, such as, knowing how to drive a car or how to do our job. Most professions expect you know and remember what to do.

On the other hand there are many more times we need to use pieces of information for only a while – we don’t need to remember them but they help us to learn at the time: details of an event, how to cook a recipe or finding out the breadth of changes in a recent government policy change.

imageToday’s pupils are very tech-savvy and comfortable working with screens.Flickr/Anthony DiLaura, CC BY-SA

Today’s school curriculum focuses on 21st century skills which are about processes of applying information, problem solving and collaborating.

A key skill in our current era is the ability to draw on lots of different types of information and bring them together to work out a solution, to gain a new perspective on a situation or to develop our knowledge of something.

Is it important to remember all the research you did for your trip to Hawaii? Probably not. As long as you can access, organise and use the information while you’re there is what most people would need.

We also all have different learning styles. The availability of a range of platforms to create information and from which we can access information is important for all. Handwriting and reading text doesn’t necessarily suit everyone.

Deep thought

If remembering and understanding are linked to deliberate action then editing some footage or composing a script for a YouTube clip needs to be well thought through. It’s not about if it was written on paper first but just that deep thought has been given to it.

Also if the argument for turning back to books is about not being distracted by online ads or checking our social media or email accounts, then it’s important that we learn to work well in our e-society. Technology is not going away.

The shift away from pen on paper has been driven by:

  • convenience – our devices are always close by
  • cost, as cloud-based content eliminates expensive printing costs
  • the thrill of the latest innovation.

These are important factors and suggest screens will become an even greater part of our lives in the future.

Some may suggest that we are losing opportunities to learn because of our love affair with our screens but our era today is about understanding and managing information and then developing knowledge from that. A turn back to focusing on remembering information is simply not important now.


Editor’s note: Joanne will answer questions between 9 and 10am AEDT on Monday December 8. Ask your questions about digital vs traditional learning in the comments below.

image

Joanne Orlando does not work for, consult to, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has no relevant affiliations.

Read more http://theconversation.com/remember-this-you-can-still-think-deeply-in-the-digital-age-34592