How Should You Distribute Your Craft Beer?

So you’ve made your own craft beer and want to start selling it around the country and possibly around the world. Where to begin? It should be straightforward but the food and beverage industry is...

News Company - avatar News Company

The Mobile Liberation and Imprisonment

We all walk around with a device in our pockets that are capable of things that go way beyond just calling someone. They are little entertainment and communication devices that have shaped our daily r...

News Company - avatar News Company

3 lessons from behavioural economics Bill Shorten's Labor Party forgot about

Three simple lessons from behavioural economics would have helped the Labor Party sell its economic credentials.www.shutterstock.comThe Australian Labor Party’s 2019 election campaign showed a d...

Tracey West, Lecturer in Behavioural Finance, Griffith University - avatar Tracey West, Lecturer in Behavioural Finance, Griffith University

‘Bright white skeletons’: some Western Australian reefs have the lowest coral cover on record

Corals at Scott Reef in 2012, and at the same site during the 2016 mass bleaching.James Gilmour/AIMSDiving on the remote coral reefs in the north of Western Australia during the world’s worst bl...

James Paton Gilmour, Research Scientist: Coral Ecology, Australian Institute of Marine Science - avatar James Paton Gilmour, Research Scientist: Coral Ecology, Australian Institute of Marine Science

From sharks in seagrass to manatees in mangroves, we've found large marine species in some surprising places

When we think of mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and saltmarshes, we don’t immediately think of shark habitats. But the first global review of links between large marine animals (megafauna) a...

Michael Sievers, Research Fellow, Global Wetlands Project, Australia Rivers Institute, Griffith University - avatar Michael Sievers, Research Fellow, Global Wetlands Project, Australia Rivers Institute, Griffith University

Aboriginal mothers are incarcerated at alarming rates – and their mental and physical health suffers

Being separated from their children affects the mental well-being of Aboriginal mothers in prison.ChrisMilesProductions/ShutterstockAboriginal women are the fastest growing prison population in Austra...

Sacha Kendall, Post-doctoral research fellow in public health, University of Technology Sydney - avatar Sacha Kendall, Post-doctoral research fellow in public health, University of Technology Sydney

How close is Sydney to the vision of creating three 30-minute cities?

Sydney CBD is highly accessible and remains clearly the dominant centre in the metropolitan region.Holli/ShutterstockThe Greater Sydney Commission has proposed a 40-year vision of a metropolitan regio...

Somwrita Sarkar, Senior Lecturer in Design and Computation, University of Sydney - avatar Somwrita Sarkar, Senior Lecturer in Design and Computation, University of Sydney

Hidden women of history: Ennigaldi-Nanna, curator of the world's first museum

The National Museum of Iraq photographed in February 2018. Many of the pieces discovered at the ruins of Ur, arranged and labelled by Ennigaldi-Nanna, can be found here.Wikimedia CommonsIn this series...

Louise Pryke, Lecturer, Languages and Literature of Ancient Israel, Macquarie University - avatar Louise Pryke, Lecturer, Languages and Literature of Ancient Israel, Macquarie University

The 'pulse' of a volcano can be used to help predict its next eruption

The 2018 eruption of Kilauea volcano was preceded by damage of the magma plumbing system at the summit.Courtesy of Grace Tobin, 60 Minutes, Author providedPredicting when a volcano will next blow is t...

Rebecca Carey, Senior Lecturer in Earth Sciences, University of Tasmania - avatar Rebecca Carey, Senior Lecturer in Earth Sciences, University of Tasmania

Queensland paper backtracks after using violent imagery to depict Annastacia Palaszczuk

Social media backlash and a Queensland government complaint to the Australian Press Council has forced the Sunshine Coast Daily to apologise to its readers for picturing Queensland Premier Annastacia ...

Jenna Price, Senior lecturer, University of Technology Sydney - avatar Jenna Price, Senior lecturer, University of Technology Sydney

Bowen carries baggage into Labor leadership contest

Shadow treasurer Chris Bowen is running for Labor leader, despite carrying the baggage of being the architect of election policies, especially on franking credits, now being blamed after Saturday&rsqu...

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra - avatar Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

US-China relations are certainly at a low point, but this is not the next Cold War

Though a Cold War between China and the US seems unlikely, there are still repercussions of a deepening rift.Roman Pilipey/EPATrump’s long-threatened trade war with China is now a reality. Beiji...

Nick Bisley, Head of Humanities and Social Sciences and Professor of International Relations at La Trobe University, La Trobe University - avatar Nick Bisley, Head of Humanities and Social Sciences and Professor of International Relations at La Trobe University, La Trobe University

Here's how to make opinion polls more representative and honest

Better opinions polls are more expensive because pollsters need to spend more effort getting a representative and honest sample of voters.ShutterstockIn 2012, US statistician Nate Silver correctly pre...

Adrian Barnett, Professor of Statistics; President of the Statistical Society of Australia, Queensland University of Technology - avatar Adrian Barnett, Professor of Statistics; President of the Statistical Society of Australia, Queensland University of Technology

After Clive Palmer's $60 million campaign, limits on political advertising are more important than ever

Clive Palmer didn't win any seats for his party in the election, but he says his massive advertising spend was "worth it" to prevent Bill Shorten from becoming prime minister.Darren England/AAPCan bil...

Marian Sawer, Emeritus Professor, School of Politics and International Relations, Australian National University - avatar Marian Sawer, Emeritus Professor, School of Politics and International Relations, Australian National University

The origins of our days of the week lie with the Romans. The Romans named their days of the week after the planets, which in turn were named after the Roman gods:

  • dies Solis “the day of the sun (then considered a planet)”
  • dies Lunae “the day of the moon”
  • dies Martis, “the day of Mars”
  • dies Mercurii, “the day of Mercury”
  • dies Iovis, “the day of Jupiter”
  • dies Veneris, “the day of Venus”
  • dies Saturni, “the day of Saturn”

When the Germanic-speaking peoples of western Europe adopted the seven-day week, which was probably in the early centuries of the Christian era, they named their days after those of their own gods who were closest in attributes and character to the Roman deities.

It was one of those peoples, the Anglo-Saxons, that brought their gods and language (what would become English) to the British Isles during the fifth and sixth centuries AD.

image Hendrik Goltzius, Mercury, oil on canvas (1611). Wikimedia Commons

In English, Saturday, Sunday and Monday are named for Saturn, the sun and moon respectively, following the Latin.

The remaining four days (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday) are named for gods that the Anglo-Saxons probably worshipped before they migrated to England and during the short time before they converted to Christianity after that.

Tuesday is named for the god Tiw, about whom relatively little is known. Tiw was probably associated with warfare, just like the Roman god Mars.

Wednesday is named for the god Woden, who is paralleled with the Roman god Mercury, probably because both gods shared attributes of eloquence, the ability to travel, and the guardianship of the dead.

Thursday is Thunor’s day, or, to give the word its Old English form, Thunresdæg “the day of Thunder”. This sits beside the Latin dies Iovis, the day of Jove or Jupiter. Both of these gods are associated with thunder in their respective mythologies.

You may recognise a similarity here with the name of the famous Norse god Thor. This may be more than coincidence. Vikings arrived in England in the ninth century, bringing their own very similar gods with them. Anglo-Saxons were already Christian by this time, but may have recognised the similarity between the name of their ancestors’ deity Thunor and the Norse god. We don’t know, but the word Thor does appear in written texts from the period.

image Chris Hemsworth as famous Norse god Thor in the 2011 film of the same name. IMDB

Friday is the only weekday named for a female deity, Frig, who is hardly mentioned anywhere else in early English. The name does appear, however, as a common noun meaning “love, affection” in poetry. That is why Frig was chosen to pair with the Roman deity Venus, who was likewise associated with love and sex, and was commemorated in the Latin name for Friday.

The concept of the week, that is, a cycle of seven numbered or named days with one of them (usually Sunday or Monday) fixed as the first, was originally probably associated with the Jewish calendar. This was complicated by the fact that early medieval Europe inherited its idea of the week from imperial Rome, via the Christian church.

In early Christianity the reckoning of time was crucial to the proper celebration of the church’s feast days and holidays, especially the variable feast of Easter.

We find day names similar to English in related European languages, like Dutch, German, and all the Scandinavian or Norse languages. Gods with comparable names, like Tyr, Othinn, Thor and Frigg, were certainly known to the Scandinavians and gave their names to weekdays in Scandinavian languages (compare Modern Danish tisdag, onsdag, torsdag, fredag).

The Latin names for the days of the week, and the Roman gods for which they were named, still live on in all the European Romance languages, like French, Spanish and Italian. Think of French lundi, mardi, mercredi, jeudi and vendredi, for example, and you will find the Latin Luna, Mars, Mercurius, Iovis and Venus hidden behind them.

Read more http://theconversation.com/explainer-the-gods-behind-the-days-of-the-week-87170