News Pronto

The Conversation

Consumer genetic testing customers stretch their DNA data further with third-party interpretation websites

  • Written by Sarah Catherine Nelson, Research Scientist in Biostatistics, University of Washington
If you've got the raw data, why not mine it for more info?Sergey Nivens/Shutterstock.com

Back in 2016, Helen (a pseudonym) took three different direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests: AncestryDNA, 23andMe and FamilyTreeDNA. She saw genetic testing as a way to enhance her paper trail genealogy research, and it panned out when she matched with...

Read more: Consumer genetic testing customers stretch their DNA data further with third-party interpretation...

What does the Trump administration want from Iran?

  • Written by Noah Weisbord, Associate Professor of law, Queen's University, Ontario

Two oil tankers were attacked on June 13 off the coast of Oman, forcing the crew members of one burning ship to flee.

It was the latest in a series of assaults on tankers transporting oil through the Gulf. In May, Saudi, Norwegian and Emirati oil tankers were attacked off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, causing damage but no casualties. The...

Read more: What does the Trump administration want from Iran?

For some, self-tracking means more than self-help

  • Written by Joseph Reagle, Associate Professor of Communication Studies, Northeastern University
What does all that data mean to you?Andrey_Popov/shutterstock.com

People who identify with the “Quantified Self movement” are, as expressed in the movement’s motto, seeking “self-knowledge through self-tracking.” They want to know how to sleep better, stay fit or have a more productive morning. They do this by keeping...

Read more: For some, self-tracking means more than self-help

How to handle raccoons, snakes and other critters in your yard (hint: not with a thermos)

  • Written by Leslie Burger, Assistant Extension Professor of Wildlife, Fisheries & Aquaculture, Mississippi State University
Oh-so-cute raccoons can carry diseases and also fight with pets. If you don't want raccoons around, minimize food sources such as bird seed.Nancy Salmon/Shutterstock.com

I heard a local story of a man who, in his excitement to kill a rattlesnake, used the only thing he had available ─ his thermos bottle. The next scene in this drama has the...

Read more: How to handle raccoons, snakes and other critters in your yard (hint: not with a thermos)

'I still get tweets to go back in the kitchen' – the enduring power of sexism in sports media

  • Written by Michael Serazio, Associate Professor of Communication, Boston College
Lesley Visser was one of the first female television sports reporters – but she's appalled at how little progress has been made.AP Photo/Bill Sikes

The story of the 2019 U.S. women’s national soccer team is not yet written, but its opening chapter – a 13-0 drubbing of Thailand – has inspired American fans hoping for a...

Read more: 'I still get tweets to go back in the kitchen' – the enduring power of sexism in sports media

Rapid DNA analysis helps diagnose mystery diseases

  • Written by Charles Chiu, Professor of Laboratory Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
Decoding all the DNA in a patient's biological sample can reveal whether an infectious microbe is causing the disease.ktsdesign/Shutterstock.com

As doctors, we deal with a lot of uncertainty. Often, it is difficult to diagnose what is making a patient sick because symptoms from both infectious and non-infectious diseases can be indistinguishable...

Read more: Rapid DNA analysis helps diagnose mystery diseases

Inflation is healthy for the economy – but too much can trigger a recession

  • Written by Richard S. Warr, Professor of Finance, North Carolina State University
Prices may go up – but that's not always a bad thing.AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

In a healthy economy, prices tend to go up – a process called inflation.

While you might not like that as a consumer, moderate price growth is a sign of a healthy, growing economy. And, historically at least, wages tend to go up at about the same pace during...

Read more: Inflation is healthy for the economy – but too much can trigger a recession

Food label nutrition facts matter to you, but don't tell you much about your gut microbes

  • Written by Abigail Johnson, Postdoctoral Associate, University of Minnesota
What nutrients will help the microbes in your gut thrive? Rocketclips, Inc./Shutterstock.com

It seems like every day a new study is published that links the bacteria in the gut to a specific disease or health condition. The allure of research like ours and that of other groups is that it might eventually be possible to give personalized...

Read more: Food label nutrition facts matter to you, but don't tell you much about your gut microbes

What the ban on gene-edited babies means for family planning

  • Written by Marie Menke, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh
When it comes to reproduction, couple have more choices than ever before.Chinnapong/Shutterstock.com

Technology surrounding the human embryo has moved out of the realm of science fiction and into the reality of difficult decisions. Clinical embryologists fertilize human eggs for the purpose of helping couples conceive. The genetic makeup of these...

Read more: What the ban on gene-edited babies means for family planning

What Orwell's '1984' tells us about today's world, 70 years after it was published

  • Written by Stephen Groening, Assistant Professor of Cinema and Media Studies, University of Washington
The dominant reading of George Orwell's dystopian novel, "1984" has been that it was a dire prediction of what could be. Denis Hamel Côté, CC BY-SA

Seventy years ago, Eric Blair, writing under a pseudonym George Orwell, published “1984,” now generally considered a classic of dystopian fiction.

The novel tells the story of...

Read more: What Orwell's '1984' tells us about today's world, 70 years after it was published

More Articles ...

  1. Companies' self-regulation doesn't have to be bad for the public
  2. Could a weakening US economy imperil Trump's trade war against China?
  3. A growing source of Canadian asylum-seekers: US citizens whose parents were born elsewhere
  4. The Defense Department is worried about climate change – and also a huge carbon emitter
  5. The 25th Amendment wouldn’t work to dump Trump
  6. Artificial intelligence-enhanced journalism offers a glimpse of the future of the knowledge economy
  7. E-cig companies use cartoon characters as logos, and new study shows it works
  8. 23% of young black women now identify as bisexual
  9. Minorities face more obstacles to a lifesaving organ transplant
  10. Why Sudan's deadly crackdown on protesters could escalate in coming weeks
  11. Migrants will pay the price of Mexico's tariff deal with Trump
  12. Investigating the investigative reporters: Bad news from Down Under
  13. The struggle to find silence in the ancient monastic world – and now
  14. What advice articles miss about 'summer loss'
  15. The most unpopular presidential election winner ever could win again in 2020
  16. Driverless cars are going to disrupt the airline industry
  17. Trophies made from human skulls hint at regional conflicts around the time of Maya civilization's mysterious collapse
  18. A concise history of the US abortion debate
  19. May jobs report suggests a slowing economy – and possibly an imminent interest rate cut
  20. Climate change alters what's possible in restoring Florida's Everglades
  21. Forget lower jobs growth, the number of people who've stopped looking for work is much more worrisome
  22. Are brain games mostly BS?
  23. School vouchers expand despite evidence of negative effects
  24. How the 'good guy with a gun' became a deadly American fantasy
  25. Convicts are returning to farming – anti-immigrant policies are the reason
  26. Privacy concerns don't stop people from putting their DNA on the internet to help solve crimes
  27. Does hitting the snooze button really help you feel better?
  28. What would happen to Congress if Washington, DC became the 51st state?
  29. What the US could learn about vaccination from Nigeria
  30. The tell-tale clue to how meteorites were made, at the birth of the solar system
  31. No, Americans shouldn't fear traveling abroad
  32. Women have been the heart of the Christian right for decades
  33. The debate over what ails philanthropy heats up
  34. My students see giving money away as a good thing but they're getting leery of billionaire donors
  35. As more developing countries reject plastic waste exports, wealthy nations seek solutions at home
  36. Spider glue's sticky secret revealed by new genetic research
  37. Antibiotic resistance is not new – it existed long before people used drugs to kill bacteria
  38. Brazilian universities fear Bolsonaro plan to eliminate humanities and slash public education budgets
  39. Will children in your state get the support they need? It depends on the 2020 census
  40. Trump's Mexico tariffs don't make sense, but Americans will pay a steep price anyway if they go into effect
  41. Hackers seek ransoms from Baltimore and communities across the US
  42. How 'America's Got Talent' contestant Kodi Lee shattered stereotypes about disability
  43. Cheaper versions of the most expensive drugs may be coming, but monopolies will likely remain
  44. Climate change is driving rapid shifts between high and low water levels on the Great Lakes
  45. Violence climbs in Colombia as president chips away at landmark peace deal with FARC guerrillas
  46. The racist roots of American policing: From slave patrols to traffic stops
  47. The war on women coaches
  48. What is Eid and how do Muslims celebrate it? 6 questions answered
  49. Angkor Wat archaeological digs yield new clues to its civilization's decline
  50. Big tech surveillance could damage democracy