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The Conversation

Consumer electronics have changed a lot in 20 years – systems for managing e-waste aren't keeping up

  • Written by Callie Babbitt, Associate Professor of Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology
imageMost of the world's electronics are not recycled, posing health and environmental risks. catscandotcom/Getty Images

It’s hard to imagine navigating modern life without a mobile phone in hand. Computers, tablets and smartphones have transformed how we communicate, work, learn, share news and entertain ourselves. They became even more essential...

Read more: Consumer electronics have changed a lot in 20 years – systems for managing e-waste aren't keeping up

18 million US children are at risk of hunger: How is the problem being addressed and what more can be done?

  • Written by Heather Eicher-Miller, Associate Professor of Nutrition Science, Purdue University
imageDespite help from the government and charities, the number of food-insecure kids is rising. NurPhoto/Getty Images

Editor’s note: The economic crisis brought about by the coronavirus pandemic has increased the number of Americans who can’t always get enough to eat, including children. The Conversation U.S. asked four experts to explain...

Read more: 18 million US children are at risk of hunger: How is the problem being addressed and what more can...

Vitamin K: A little-known but noteworthy nutrient

  • Written by Kyla Shea, Scientist I, Vitamin K Research Team at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Tufts University
imageMany plant-based foods are high in vitamin K.ratmaner via Getty Images

When Danish scientist Henrik Dam fed a cholesterol-free diet to baby chicks in his lab about 90 years ago, he noticed excessive bleeding in some of them. It did not stop after he replaced the cholesterol. Dam ultimately concluded the bleeding was related to a “depletion of...

Read more: Vitamin K: A little-known but noteworthy nutrient

Japan's most famous writer committed suicide after a failed coup attempt – now, new photos add more layers to the haunting act

  • Written by Kirsten Cather, Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Austin College of Liberal Arts
imageJapanese author Yukio Mishima speaks to Japanese Self-Defense Force soldiers at Tokyo's military garrison station on Nov. 25, 1970.JIJI PRESS/AFP via Getty Images

Japanese writer Yukio Mishima has long been a favorite of the international press. In a 1966 edition of Life magazine, he was called “Japan’s Dynamo of Letters” and...

Read more: Japan's most famous writer committed suicide after a failed coup attempt – now, new photos add...

Why Trump's challenges to democracy will be a big problem for Biden

  • Written by James D. Long, Associate Professor of Political Science, Co-founder of the Political Economy Forum, Host of "Neither Free Nor Fair?" podcast, University of Washington
imageJust because he's leaving office doesn't mean Donald Trump will stop being a threat to democracy.AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

When a mob attacked the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 and stopped Congress from certifying Joe Biden as the nation’s next president, it was scary – and fatal for at least five people.

But it did not pose a serious threat...

Read more: Why Trump's challenges to democracy will be a big problem for Biden

A scholar of American anti-Semitism explains the hate symbols present during the US Capitol riot

  • Written by Jonathan D. Sarna, University Professor and Joseph H. & Belle R. Braun Professor of American Jewish History, Brandeis University
imageCrowds carrying hate symbols as they stormed the U.S Capitol on Jan. 6 in Washington, D.C.Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

One of the many horrifying images from the Jan. 6 rampage on the U.S. Capitol shows a long-haired, long-bearded man wearing a blackCamp Auschwitz” T-shirt emblazoned with a skull and crossbones, and under it...

Read more: A scholar of American anti-Semitism explains the hate symbols present during the US Capitol riot

Federal leaders have two options if they want to rein in Trump

  • Written by Kirsten Carlson, Associate Professor of Law and Adjunct Associate Professor of Political Science, Wayne State University
imagePresident Donald Trump gestures during a Jan. 6 speech in Washington, D.C.AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

As the world reacts to the Jan. 6 armed attack on the U.S. Capitol encouraged by President Donald Trump, many Americans are wondering what happens next. Members of Congress, high-level officials and even major corporations and business groups have...

Read more: Federal leaders have two options if they want to rein in Trump

Far-right activists on social media telegraphed violence weeks in advance of the attack on the US Capitol

  • Written by Alex Newhouse, Research Lead, Center on Terrorism, Extremism, and Counterterrorism, Middlebury Institute of International Studies
imageThe people who attacked the U.S. Capitol building lived up to their word to engage in violence.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The attack on the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6 was shocking, but no one following right-wing activity on social media should have been surprised. The attempt by President Donald Trump’s far-right supporters...

Read more: Far-right activists on social media telegraphed violence weeks in advance of the attack on the US...

After a record 22 billion-dollar disasters in 2020, it's time to overhaul US disaster policy – here's how

  • Written by A.R. Siders, Assistant Professor, Disaster Research Center, University of Delaware
imageIn a year tied for the warmest on record globally, the U.S. was hit with costly hurricanes, wildfires, storms and drought.AP Photo/Noah Berger and Gerald Herbert

The year 2020 broke disaster records across the country in destructive and expensive ways. The Atlantic had so many hurricanes, meteorologists ran out of tropical storm names for only the...

Read more: After a record 22 billion-dollar disasters in 2020, it's time to overhaul US disaster policy –...

Gaming has benefits and perils – parents can help kids by playing with them

  • Written by Katie Headrick Taylor, Associate Professor of Learning Sciences and Human Development, University of Washington
imagePlaying games can offer an insider's perspective on screen time quality and quantity.James Sheppard/Future via Getty Images

As the pandemic forced many Americans to hunker down at home, the video game industry saw record spending and profits in 2020. Interacting with other people through gaming became, for some players, essential for social...

Read more: Gaming has benefits and perils – parents can help kids by playing with them

More Articles ...

  1. What the 'doctor' title means for women of color with doctorates
  2. 5 strategies for cultivating hope this year
  3. Thousands of Brazilians who won elections as Black candidates in 2020 previously ran for office as white
  4. The uncomfortable questions facing Capitol Police over the security breach by MAGA mob
  5. Vaccine delays reveal unexpected weak link in supply chains: A shortage of workers
  6. It is difficult, if not impossible, to estimate the size of the crowd that stormed Capitol Hill
  7. Chadwick Boseman's Black Panther gives a boost to diversity in STEM – a Black engineer's take on personal and professional inspiration
  8. What is Pure Land Buddhism? A look at how East Asian Buddhists chant and strive for buddhahood
  9. Why do smoke alarms keep going off even when there's no smoke?
  10. The insurrection at the Capitol challenged how US media frames unrest and shapes public opinion
  11. How does the 25th Amendment work, and can it be used to remove Trump from office after US Capitol attack?
  12. Connected workouts can help you get fit alongside virtual buddies during the pandemic
  13. US Capitol protesters, egged on by Trump, are part of a long history of white supremacists hearing politicians' words as encouragement
  14. Pikas are adapting to climate change remarkably well, contrary to many predictions
  15. Was it a coup? No, but siege on US Capitol was the election violence of a fragile democracy
  16. 'Once you engage in political violence, it becomes easier to do it again' – an expert on political violence reflects on events at the Capitol
  17. Yellow Gadsden flag, prominent in Capitol takeover, carries a long and shifting history
  18. COVID-19 crisis in Los Angeles: Why activating 'crisis standards of care' is crucial for overwhelmed hospitals
  19. Legalizing marijuana, once a pipe dream on Capitol Hill, takes an important step forward
  20. Trump tapped into white victimhood – leaving fertile ground for white supremacists
  21. In Mike Pence, US evangelicals had their '24-karat-gold' man in the White House
  22. What is a margin of error? This statistical tool can help you understand vaccine trials and political polling
  23. School budgets have held up better than expected in some states, but looming cuts will hurt learning long after pandemic ends
  24. Voting in Georgia runoff went better than June's disastrous primary, but trouble still lingers
  25. Why Trump's Senate supporters can't overturn Electoral College results they don't like – here's how the law actually works
  26. Fewer kids are enrolled in public kindergarten – that will have a lasting impact on schools and equity
  27. Mississippi just got rid of its Electoral College-like election process
  28. How kids can benefit from mindfulness training
  29. Air pollution may contribute to Alzheimer’s and dementia risk – here's what we're learning from brain scans
  30. How many people need to get a COVID-19 vaccine in order to stop the coronavirus?
  31. Can a future ban on gas-powered cars work? An economist explains
  32. In a time of social and environmental crisis, Aldo Leopold's call for a 'land ethic' is still relevant
  33. Trump's 'smoking gun' tape is worse than Nixon's, but congressional Republicans have less incentive to do anything about it
  34. Populism erupts when people feel disconnected and disrespected
  35. Ready to try an old approach to a New Year’s resolution? The story of Saint Ignatius may provide some guidance
  36. The cold supply chain can't reach everywhere – that's a big problem for equitable COVID-19 vaccination
  37. The 'gateway drug to corruption and overspending' is returning to Congress – but are earmarks really that bad?
  38. Rooting out racism in children's books
  39. How does your brain wake up from sleep?
  40. When working out makes you sick to your stomach: What to know about exercise-induced nausea
  41. Group exercise may be even better for you than solo workouts – here's why
  42. Seat belts and smoking rates show people eventually adopt healthy behaviors – but it can take time we don't have during a pandemic
  43. America's newest voters look back at the 2020 election – and forward to politics in 2021
  44. The Sunburst hack was massive and devastating – 5 observations from a cybersecurity expert
  45. In 2020, TV and film still couldn't get abortion right
  46. Whether slow or fast, here's how your metabolism influences how many calories you burn each day
  47. How to outsmart your COVID-19 fears and boost your mood in 2021
  48. Instagram's redesign shifts toward shopping – here's how that can be harmful
  49. Getting COVID-19 vaccines to rural Americans is harder than it looks – but there are ways to lift the barriers
  50. 7 research-based resolutions that will help strengthen your relationship in the year ahead
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