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The Conversation

How to hide from a drone – the subtle art of 'ghosting' in the age of surveillance

  • Written by Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, Associate Professor of Political Sociology, University of San Diego
imageThe federal government has used military-grade border patrol drones like this one to monitor protests in US cities._ Jonathan Cutrer/Flickr, CC BY-SA

Drones of all sizes are being used by environmental advocates to monitor deforestation, by conservationists to track poachers, and by journalists and activists to document large protests. As a politica...

Read more: How to hide from a drone – the subtle art of 'ghosting' in the age of surveillance

Yes, kids can get COVID-19 – 3 pediatricians explain what's known about coronavirus and children

  • Written by Kathryn Moffett-Bradford, Professor of Pediatrics, Division Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, West Virginia University
imageChildren are at risk of getting sick from coronavirus and need to practice social distancing and mask wearing too. AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File

We arethree pediatricinfectious disease specialists who live and work in West Virginia. The West Virginia University health system serves 400,000 children and according to our internal data, to date, 2,520...

Read more: Yes, kids can get COVID-19 – 3 pediatricians explain what's known about coronavirus and children

Marie Tharp pioneered mapping the bottom of the ocean 6 decades ago – scientists are still learning about Earth's last frontier

  • Written by Suzanne OConnell, Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wesleyan University
imageTharp with an undersea map at her desk. Rolled sonar profiles of the ocean floor are on the shelf behind her.Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the estate of Marie Tharp

Despite all the deep-sea expeditions and samples taken from the seabed over the past 100 years, humans still know very little about the ocean’s deepest reaches. And there...

Read more: Marie Tharp pioneered mapping the bottom of the ocean 6 decades ago – scientists are still...

Many students with the potential to excel in STEM fields struggle in school

  • Written by Joni Lakin, Associate Professor of Educational Studies, University of Alabama
imageWhat else might she build someday?Kobyakov/iStock via Getty Images Plus

The Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work.

The big idea

Students who have the kinds of talent scientists and engineers need to solve problems by visualizing how objects could be rotated, combined or changed in three dimensions often struggle at school....

Read more: Many students with the potential to excel in STEM fields struggle in school

Companies are struggling to engage with today's activists – a new survey explores why

  • Written by Fred Cook, Director, Center for Public Relations, University of Southern California, Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
imageCompanies are having trouble keeping up with the recent rise of activism.AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

Dozens of companies with no track record of activism have made statements in recent weeks in support of Black Lives Matter following what I believe is unprecedented pressure from racial justice protesters.

It may have come as a surprise to some...

Read more: Companies are struggling to engage with today's activists – a new survey explores why

Cómo Jesús llegó a parecerse a un europeo blanco

  • Written by Anna Swartwood House, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of South Carolina
imagePintura que representa la transfiguración de Jesús, un evento narrado en el Nuevo Testamento en el que Jesús se vuelve radiante sobre una montaña.Artist Raphael /Collections Hallwyl Museum, CC BY-SA

La representación de Jesús como un hombre blanco y europeo vuelve a estar en el punto de mira durante este...

Read more: Cómo Jesús llegó a parecerse a un europeo blanco

When a winner becomes a loser: Winston Churchill was kicked out of office in the British election of 1945

  • Written by Klaus W. Larres, Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professor; Adjunct Professor of the Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
imageWinston Churchill giving his final address, during the 1945 election campaign, at Walthamstow Stadium, East London.Wikipedia, the collections of the Imperial War Museums

The end of World War II in Europe and the defeat of Hitler and Nazi Germany in early May 1945 turned British Prime Minister Winston Churchill into the world’s most eminent...

Read more: When a winner becomes a loser: Winston Churchill was kicked out of office in the British election...

4 lawsuits that challenge Trump's federal agents in Portland test issues other cities will likely face

  • Written by Sarah J. Adams-Schoen, Assistant Professor of Law, University of Oregon
imageFederal officers using large amounts of tear gas against protesters in Portland, Oregon on July 21.John Rudoff/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

President Donald Trump has announced that the U.S. Department of Justice will send a “surge of federal law enforcement” into American cities run by “extreme politicians” who are on an...

Read more: 4 lawsuits that challenge Trump's federal agents in Portland test issues other cities will likely...

At the evangelical Creation Museum, dinosaurs lived alongside humans and the world is 6,000 years old

  • Written by William Trollinger, Professor of History, University of Dayton
imageChristian fundamentalists like Ken A. Ham, CEO of the evangelical group that owns the Creation Museum, believe dinosaurs were among the animals rescued on Noah's Ark.Jeff Haynes/AFP via Getty Images

Summer travel in the United States has slowed but not stopped due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Among those destinations that have recently reopened is,...

Read more: At the evangelical Creation Museum, dinosaurs lived alongside humans and the world is 6,000 years...

Urban planning as a tool of white supremacy – the other lesson from Minneapolis

  • Written by Julian Agyeman, Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, Tufts University
imageMinneapolis, a city still split along racial lines.Jason Armond/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The legacy of structural racism in Minneapolis was laid bare to the world at the intersection of Chicago Avenue and East 38th Street, the location where George Floyd’s neck was pinned to the ground by a police officer’s knee. But it is...

Read more: Urban planning as a tool of white supremacy – the other lesson from Minneapolis

More Articles ...

  1. What are the origins of cathedrals and chapels?
  2. Video: Slowing deforestation is the key to preventing the next pandemic – but what does that cost?
  3. The road to electric vehicles with lower sticker prices than gas cars – battery costs explained
  4. The mystery of the missing portrait of Robert Hooke, 17th-century scientist extraordinaire
  5. The Americans with Disabilities Act at 30: A cause for celebration during COVID-19?
  6. Síndrome de Guillain-Barré, raro trastorno neurológico relacionado con COVID-19
  7. Making coronavirus testing easy, accurate and fast is critical to ending the pandemic – the US response is falling far short
  8. The office is dead! Long live the office in a post-pandemic world
  9. Statues topple and a Catholic church burns as California reckons with its Spanish colonial past
  10. Why Hagia Sophia remains a potent symbol of spiritual and political authority
  11. The ADA isn't just about ramps -- over 30 years, it has profoundly changed the deaf community
  12. John Lewis traded the typical college experience for activism, arrests and jail cells
  13. Love avocados? Thank the toxodon
  14. 3 questions to ask yourself next time you see a graph, chart or map
  15. ¿Cómo el 'blanco' se convirtió en una metáfora de las cosas buenas?
  16. Why hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine don't block coronavirus infection of human lung cells
  17. How the images of John Lewis being beaten during 'Bloody Sunday' went viral
  18. Science elicits hope in Americans – its positive brand doesn't need to be partisan
  19. Disinformation campaigns are murky blends of truth, lies and sincere beliefs – lessons from the pandemic
  20. Online Christian pilgrimage: How a virtual tour to Lourdes follows a tradition of innovation
  21. Massive online open courses see exponential growth during COVID-19 pandemic
  22. What are political parties' platforms – and do they matter?
  23. How to make sure you're wearing your mask right
  24. Low-wage service workers are facing new emotional hazards in the workplace during COVID-19
  25. Is telehealth as good as in-person care? A telehealth researcher explains how to get the most out of remote health care
  26. The Constitution doesn't have a problem with mask mandates
  27. People are dying in US prisons, and not just from COVID-19
  28. Telework mostly benefits white, affluent Americans – and offers few climate benefits
  29. How other countries reopened schools during the pandemic – and what the US can learn from them
  30. How popular culture hobbles protest movements
  31. Random testing in Indiana shows COVID-19 is 6 times deadlier than flu, and 2.8% of the state has been infected
  32. Georgia's election disaster shows how bad voting in 2020 can be
  33. 'In a perfectly just republic,' Bella Abzug – born a century ago – would have been president
  34. Coronavirus numbers confusing you? Here's how to make sense of them
  35. Russian cyberthreat extends to coronavirus vaccine research
  36. Social networks aim to erase hate but miss the target on guns
  37. Could employers and states mandate COVID-19 vaccinations? Here's what the courts have ruled
  38. Black men face high discrimination and depression, even as their education and incomes rise
  39. Colleges expect athletes to work but not to air any grievances – here's why that's wrong
  40. New teachers mistakenly assume Black students are angry
  41. How Taiwanese death rituals have adapted for families living in the US
  42. With fewer cars on US streets, now is the time to reinvent roadways and how we use them
  43. ALS scientific breakthrough: Diabetes drug metformin shows promise in mouse study for a common type of ALS
  44. Sexism pushed Rosalind Franklin toward the scientific sidelines during her short life, but her work still shines on her 100th birthday
  45. In Kashmir, military lockdown and pandemic combined are one giant deadly threat
  46. Electoral College benefits whiter states, study shows
  47. COVID-19 has ravaged American newsrooms – here's why that matters
  48. How local governments can attract companies that will help keep their economies afloat during COVID-19
  49. Why Indian American spelling bee success is more than just an endearing story
  50. Mandatory face masks might lull people into taking more coronavirus risks