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Peru has a new president, its fifth in five years – who is Pedro Castillo?

  • Written by Catesby Holmes, International Editor | Politics Editor, The Conversation US
imageOn the campaign trail, Pedro Castillo often wore a straw-palm hat typical of Peru's rural Cajamarca region, where he is from. Ricardo Moreira/Getty Images

A 51-year-old farmer and teacher who wears a traditional Andean palm-straw hat takes office as Peru’s president on July 28, 2021, after a bitterly contested election.

Pedro Castillo was...

Read more: Peru has a new president, its fifth in five years – who is Pedro Castillo?

‘Mega sequía’ en la frontera aviva las disputas entre EU y México por desabasto de agua

  • Written by Robert Gabriel Varady, Research Professor of Environmental Policy, University of Arizona
imageEl lago Mead, que abastece a siete estados de Estados Unidos y dos de México, se está secando.Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Estados Unidos y México están luchando por sus menguantes suministros de agua compartidos después de años de calor sin precedentes y lluvias insuficientes.

imageLa cuenca del río Colorado....

Read more: ‘Mega sequía’ en la frontera aviva las disputas entre EU y México por desabasto de agua

Small climate changes can have devastating local consequences – it happened in the Little Ice Age

  • Written by Dagomar Degroot, Associate Professor of Environmental History, Georgetown University
imageThe Little Ice Age brought some bitter extremes.Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1565

In recent weeks, catastrophic floods overwhelmed towns in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands, inundated subway tunnels in China, swept through northwestern Africa and triggered deadly landslides in India and Japan. Heat and drought fanned wildfires in the North...

Read more: Small climate changes can have devastating local consequences – it happened in the Little Ice Age

Keeping nonprofit CEOs out of the room when boards decide what to pay them yields good results

  • Written by Ilona Babenko, Associate Professor of Finance, Arizona State University
imageIt's hard for boards to make good decisions about what to pay someone who has a seat at the table.Shannon Fagan/The Image Bank via Getty Images

The Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work.

The big idea

Keeping nonprofit chief executive officers out of meetings when members of their boards discuss or vote on compensation can...

Read more: Keeping nonprofit CEOs out of the room when boards decide what to pay them yields good results

Biden wants to crack down on bank mergers – here's why that could help consumers and the economy

  • Written by Jeremy Kress, Assistant Professor of Business Law, University of Michigan
imageBiden directed regulators to find ways to limit bank mergers. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

President Joe Biden signed a sweeping executive order on July 9, 2021, that aims to increase competition throughout the U.S. economy. In one of the order’s most significant provisions, he directed federal regulators to strengthen oversight of bank mergers.

As...

Read more: Biden wants to crack down on bank mergers – here's why that could help consumers and the economy

Domestic violence 911 calls increased during lockdown, but official police reports and arrests declined

  • Written by Jillian B. Carr, Assistant Professor of Economics, Purdue University
imageShelter-in-place measures have made it more difficult for victims of domestic violence to escape from their abusers.Elizabeth Livermore/Moment via Getty Images

COVID-19 stay-at-home orders surely saved many lives, but a growing number of studies document that lockdowns led to more reports of domestic violence.

Even as 911 calls for police help...

Read more: Domestic violence 911 calls increased during lockdown, but official police reports and arrests...

Taliban 'has not changed,' say women facing subjugation in areas of Afghanistan under its extremist rule

  • Written by Homa Hoodfar, Professor of Anthropology, Emerita, Concordia University
imageAfghan citizens at a March 2021 rally in Kabul to support peace talks between the Taliban and the government. Haroon Sabawoon/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The Taliban insurgents continue their deadly war to seize control of Afghanistan after the departure of United States and NATO forces. As they close in on major cities that were once...

Read more: Taliban 'has not changed,' say women facing subjugation in areas of Afghanistan under its...

Swimming gives your brain a boost – but scientists don't know yet why it's better than other aerobic activities

  • Written by Seena Mathew, Assistant Professor of Biology, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor
imageSwimming offers a host of beneficial effects on the brain.Stanislaw Pytel/Stone via Getty Images

It’s no secret that aerobic exercise can help stave off some of the ravages of aging. But a growing body of research suggests that swimming might provide a unique boost to brain health.

Regular swimming has been shown to improve memory, cognitive...

Read more: Swimming gives your brain a boost – but scientists don't know yet why it's better than other...

Why Canadian dads are more involved in raising their kids than American fathers

  • Written by Kevin Shafer, Associate Professor of Sociology and Director of Canadian Studies, Brigham Young University
imageA third of American fathers work 50 or more hours a week, compared with less than 10% of Canadian fathers. Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Thirty-five years ago, Canadian and American dads were doing a similar amount of child rearing, relative to mothers. Surveys from the mid 1980s showed that Canadian men spent 38% of the time...

Read more: Why Canadian dads are more involved in raising their kids than American fathers

Snow can disappear straight into the atmosphere in hot, dry weather

  • Written by Steven R. Fassnacht, Professor of Snow Hydrology, Colorado State University
imageIn high alpine terrain, sun and dry air can turn snow straight into water vapor. Jeffrey Pang/WikimediaCommons, CC BY

Creeks, rivers and lakes that are fed by melting snow across the U.S. West are already running low as of mid-July 2021, much to the worry of farmers, biologists and snow hydrologists like me. This is not surprising in California,...

Read more: Snow can disappear straight into the atmosphere in hot, dry weather

More Articles ...

  1. New school planned by Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine seeks to teach blend of skills to prepare students for real-world jobs
  2. What is the HIPAA Privacy Rule? A health law scholar explains
  3. 4 Haitian novels that beautifully blend history, memory and reality
  4. Worried about traveling with unvaccinated kids? 6 questions answered on how to manage the risks
  5. Fight for control threatens to destabilize and fragment the internet
  6. COVID-19 could cause male infertility and sexual dysfunction – but vaccines do not
  7. Kids' grip strength is improving, but other measures of muscle fitness are getting worse
  8. Joy and grief will coexist as Americans return to pre-pandemic life – 'everyday memorials' will help
  9. What is unrestricted funding? Two philanthropy experts explain
  10. Why does gravity pull us down and not up?
  11. Sexual harassment cases at school: Appeals court ruling could change how schools judge complaints
  12. Surfing makes its Olympic debut – and the waves should be world-class thanks to wind, sand and a typhoon or two
  13. A winning edge for the Olympics and everyday life: Focusing on what you're trying to accomplish rather than what's going on with your body
  14. What would the ancient Greeks think of an Olympics with no fans?
  15. Is climate change to blame for the recent weather disasters? 2 things you need to understand
  16. Why America has a debt ceiling: 5 questions answered
  17. Extreme heat waves in a warming world don't just break records -- they shatter them
  18. Extreme heat waves in a warming world don't just break records – they shatter them
  19. How limiting Latin Mass may become the defining moment for Pope Francis
  20. In times of stress, turning to contemplation can be helpful – here's why religions emphasize rest
  21. There's a long history of dances being pilfered for profit – and TikTok is the latest battleground
  22. The Trump administration feuded with state and local leaders over pandemic response – now the Biden administration is trying to turn back a page in history
  23. This is what happens to child migrants found alone at the border, from the moment they cross into the US until age 18
  24. Pandemic has teens feeling worried, unmotivated and disconnected from school
  25. DACA in doubt after court ruling: 3 questions answered
  26. Screentime can make you feel sick – here are ways to manage cybersickness
  27. Canceling student loan debt will barely boost the economy, but a targeted approach could help certain groups
  28. Should fully immunized people wear masks indoors? An infectious disease physician weighs in
  29. Our analysis of 7 months of polling data shows friendships, the economy and firsthand experience shaped and reshaped views on COVID-19 risks
  30. Scientists understood physics of climate change in the 1800s – thanks to a woman named Eunice Foote
  31. AI spots shipwrecks from the ocean surface – and even from the air
  32. Afghanistan after the US withdrawal: The Taliban speak more moderately but their extremist rule hasn't evolved in 20 years
  33. US is split between the vaccinated and unvaccinated – and deaths and hospitalizations reflect this divide
  34. Are middle lanes fastest in track and field? Data from 8,000 racers shows not so much
  35. Why Gil Scott-Heron's 'Whitey on the Moon' still feels relevant today
  36. Why women need male allies in the workplace – and why fighting everyday sexism enriches men too
  37. Insulin was discovered 100 years ago – but it took a lot more than one scientific breakthrough to get a diabetes treatment to patients
  38. Lawsuits over bans on teaching critical race theory are coming – here's what won't work, and what might
  39. COVID-19 recession: One of America's deepest downturns was also its shortest after bailout-driven bounceback
  40. Effects of childhood adversity linger during college years
  41. Why a 19th-century Russian anarchist is relevant to the mask and vaccine debate
  42. How to avoid food-borne illness – a nutritionist explains
  43. Free school meals for all children can improve kids' health
  44. The US Army tried portable nuclear power at remote bases 60 years ago – it didn't go well
  45. Why the US won't be able to shirk moral responsibility in leaving Afghanistan
  46. Energy pipelines are controversial now, but one of the first big ones helped win World War II
  47. Low- and middle-income countries lack access to big data analysis – here's how to fill the gap
  48. We are all propagandists now
  49. Election polls in 2020 produced 'error of unusual magnitude,' expert panel finds, without pinpointing cause
  50. For some craft beer drinkers, less can mean more
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