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GOP primary elections use flawed math to pick nominees

  • Written by Ismar Volić, Professor of Mathematics, Director of Institute for Mathematics and Democracy, Wellesley College
imageHow people vote isn't always reflected in how elections are decided.bamlou/DigitalVision Vectors via Getty Images

Republicans around the country are picking a nominee to run for president. However, their process – designed and run by the party, not government officials – is a mess of flawed mathematics that can end up delivering a...

Read more: GOP primary elections use flawed math to pick nominees

How media coverage of presidential primaries fails voters and has helped Trump

  • Written by Karyn Amira, Associate Professor of Political Science, College of Charleston
imageGOP presidential candidate Ron DeSantis on television screens at a Washington, D.C. bar during the first 2024 Republican presidential primary debate on Aug. 23, 2023. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

It’s common to hear Americans complain about the media throughout presidential elections. Partisans tend to believe the press is biased against...

Read more: How media coverage of presidential primaries fails voters and has helped Trump

US barrels toward another government shutdown showdown: 4 essential reads

  • Written by Bryan Keogh, Managing Editor
imagePresident Biden and Vice President Harris met on Feb. 27, 2024, with congressional leaders to avert a shutdown.AP Photo/Evan Vucci

President Joe Biden summoned congressional leaders to the White House on Feb. 27, 2024, in a bid to avoid a government shutdown. Democrats and Republicans remain far apart on funding the government, as a group of...

Read more: US barrels toward another government shutdown showdown: 4 essential reads

Betty Smith enchanted a generation of readers with ‘A Tree Grows in Brooklyn’ − even as she groused that she hoped Williamsburg would be flattened

  • Written by Rachel Gordan, Assistant Professor of Religion and Jewish Studies, University of Florida
imageBetty Smith's novel sold millions of copies in the 1940s.Weegee/International Center of Photography via Getty Images

Eighty years ago, in the winter and spring of 1944, Brooklyn-born author Betty Smith was entering a new chapter of life.

A year earlier, she was an unknown writer, negotiating with her publisher about manuscript edits and the date of...

Read more: Betty Smith enchanted a generation of readers with ‘A Tree Grows in Brooklyn’ − even as she...

Where does lightning strike? New maps pinpoint 36.8 million yearly ground strike points in unprecedented detail

  • Written by Chris Vagasky, Meteorologist, University of Wisconsin-Madison
imageLightning strikes near St. George, Utah.jerbarber/iStock/Getty Images Plus

It’s been a warm day, maybe even a little humid, and the tall clouds in the distance remind you of cauliflower. You hear a sharp crack, like the sound of a batter hitting a home run, or a low rumble reminiscent of a truck driving down the highway. A distant...

Read more: Where does lightning strike? New maps pinpoint 36.8 million yearly ground strike points in...

Gifts that live on, from best bodices to money for bridge repairs: Women’s wills in medieval France give a glimpse into their surprising independence

  • Written by Joelle Rollo-Koster, Professor of Medieval History, University of Rhode Island
imageWomen's wills and last testaments provide a more nuanced picture of life in the Middle Ages than medieval stereotypes allow, such as that depicted in "Death and the Prostitute" by Master of Philippe of Guelders.Gallica/Bibliothèque nationale de France/Feminae

In medieval Europe, views of women could often be summed up in two words: sinner...

Read more: Gifts that live on, from best bodices to money for bridge repairs: Women’s wills in medieval...

Hundreds of thousands of US infants every year pay the consequences of prenatal exposure to drugs, a growing crisis particularly in rural America

  • Written by Amna Umer, Associate Professor of Pediatric Epidemiology, West Virginia University
imageSubstance use during pregnancy can lead to a broad array of harmful effects.Liudmila Chernetska/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Nearly 1 in 12 newborns in the United States in 2020 – or about 300,000 infants – were exposed to alcohol, opioids, marijuana or cocaine before they were born. Exposure to these substances puts these newborns at a...

Read more: Hundreds of thousands of US infants every year pay the consequences of prenatal exposure to drugs,...

Yulia Navalnaya, widow of Alexei Navalny, steps forward to lead the Russian opposition – 3 points to understand

  • Written by Farida Jalalzai, Professor of Political Science; Associate Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, Virginia Tech
imageYulia Navalnaya, the wife of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, attends the Munich Security Conference on Feb. 16, 2024, the day it was announced Navalny was dead.Kai Pfaffenbach/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Alexei Navalny, one of Russian leader Vladimir Putin’s biggest critics and the country’s de facto opposition leader, died...

Read more: Yulia Navalnaya, widow of Alexei Navalny, steps forward to lead the Russian opposition – 3 points...

Belief in the myth of outlaw heroes partly explains Donald Trump’s die-hard support

  • Written by David G. Bromley, Professor Emeritus of World Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University
imageThe former U.S. president speaks in Greenville, S.C., on Feb. 20, 2024.Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Before Donald Trump likened himself to Russian dissident Alexei Navalny, the former president frequently compared himself with a completely opposite personality – Chicago organized crime boss Al Capone.

During a speech in Nevada in December...

Read more: Belief in the myth of outlaw heroes partly explains Donald Trump’s die-hard support

E-bike incentives are a costly way to cut carbon emissions, but they also promote health, equity and cleaner air

  • Written by Christopher R. Cherry, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee
imageA man pulls his kids behind an electric bicycle near the pier in Huntington Beach, Calif.Paul Bersebach/Orange County Register via Getty Images

E-bikes have captured widespread attention across the U.S., and for good reason. They are the most energy-efficient way to move from place to place, providing exercise in the process, and offer enough...

Read more: E-bike incentives are a costly way to cut carbon emissions, but they also promote health, equity...

More Articles ...

  1. What the ancient Indian text Bhagavad Gita can teach about not putting too much of our identity and emotions into work
  2. Omega-3 fatty acids are linked to better lung health, particularly in patients with pulmonary fibrosis
  3. A Texas court ruling on a Black student wearing hair in long locs reflects history of racism in schools
  4. I went to CPAC as an anthropologist to understand Trump’s base − they believe, more than ever, he is a savior
  5. As war in Ukraine enters third year, 3 issues could decide its outcome: Supplies, information and politics
  6. What ancient farmers can really teach us about adapting to climate change – and how political power influences success or failure
  7. Anti-immigrant pastors may be drawing attention – but faith leaders, including some evangelicals, are central to the movement to protect migrant rights
  8. How is snow made? An atmospheric scientist describes the journey of frozen ice crystals from clouds to the ground
  9. ‘Swarm of one’ robot is a single machine made up of independent modules
  10. NRA loses New York corruption trial over squandered funds – retired longtime leader Wayne LaPierre must repay millions of dollars
  11. The South Carolina primary is likely to reveal the eventual Republican presidential nominee - 3 points to understand
  12. Early COVID-19 research is riddled with poor methods and low-quality results − a problem for science the pandemic worsened but didn’t create
  13. Making the moral of the story stick − a media psychologist explains the research behind ‘Sesame Street,’ ‘Arthur’ and other children’s TV
  14. The Russia-Ukraine War has caused a staggering amount of cultural destruction – both seen and unseen
  15. Louisiana governor makes it easier for companies to receive lucrative tax breaks that take money away from cash-strapped schools
  16. How governments handle data matters for inclusion
  17. War in Ukraine at 2 years: Destruction seen from space – via radar
  18. Arsenic in landfills is still leaching into groundwater − 20 years after colleagues and I learned how the ‘king of poisons’ could escape trash dumps
  19. Trump is no Navalny, and prosecution in a democracy is a lot different than persecution in Putin’s Russia
  20. How you can tell propaganda from journalism − let’s look at Tucker Carlson’s visit to Russia
  21. With Beyoncé’s foray into country music, the genre may finally break free from the stereotypes that have long dogged it
  22. Donors gave $58 billion to higher ed in the 2023 academic year, with mega gifts up despite overall decline
  23. Colleges are using AI to prepare hospitality workers of the future
  24. EPA has tightened its target for deadly particle pollution − states need more tools to reach it
  25. Philly mayor might consider these lessons from NYC before expanding stop-and-frisk
  26. Mothers’ dieting habits and self-talk have profound impact on daughters − 2 psychologists explain how to cultivate healthy behaviors and body image
  27. Bacteria can develop resistance to drugs they haven’t encountered before − scientists figured this out decades ago in a classic experiment
  28. Wealthier, urban Americans have access to more local news – while roughly half of US counties have only one outlet or less
  29. Young people are lukewarm about Biden – and giving them more information doesn’t move the needle much
  30. Are our fears of saying ‘no’ overblown?
  31. Your heart changes in size and shape with exercise – this can lead to heart problems for some athletes and gym rats
  32. Marriage is not as effective an anti-poverty strategy as you’ve been led to believe
  33. Making it personal: Considering an issue’s relevance to your own life could help reduce political polarization
  34. Potato plant radiation sensors could one day monitor radiation in areas surrounding power plants
  35. I’ve been studying astronaut psychology since Apollo − a long voyage to Mars in a confined space could raise stress levels and make the journey more challenging
  36. What is Alaskapox? A microbiologist explains the recently discovered virus that just claimed its first fatality
  37. 3D printing promises more efficient ways to make custom explosives and rocket propellants
  38. Carbon offsets bring new investment to Appalachia’s coal fields, but most Appalachians aren’t benefiting
  39. Murderous mice attack and kill nesting albatrosses on Midway Atoll − scientists struggle to stop this gruesome new behavior
  40. Separate water fountains for Black people still stand in the South – thinly veiled monuments to the long, strange, dehumanizing history of segregation
  41. How politicians can draw fairer election districts − the same way parents make kids fairly split a piece of cake
  42. Nikki Haley insists she can lose South Carolina and still get the nomination – but that would defy history
  43. How Lula’s big-tent pragmatism won over Brazil again – with a little help from a backlash to Bolsonaro
  44. Nearly 2 million Americans are using kratom yearly, but it is banned in multiple states: A pharmacologist explains the controversy
  45. FAFSA website meltdown: How to avoid additional frustration with financial aid applications
  46. Why does a leap year have 366 days?
  47. Is Russia looking to put nukes in space? Doing so would undermine global stability and ignite an anti-satellite arms race
  48. Navalny dies in prison − but his blueprint for anti-Putin activism will live on
  49. How tax breaks strangle American schools − billions of dollars that could help students vanish from budgets, especially hurting districts that serve poor students
  50. Cult of the drone: At the two-year mark, UAVs have changed the face of war in Ukraine – but not outcomes