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Money buys even more happiness than it used to

  • Written by Jean Twenge, Professor of Psychology, San Diego State University
imageDon't listen to the old adage.PonyWang/Getty Images

Many factors determine happiness, but one has stirred considerable controversy over the years: money.

While the old adage says that money can’t buy happiness, several studies have determined that the more your income increases, the happier you are, up until US$75,000 a year. After hitting...

Read more: Money buys even more happiness than it used to

Vigilantism, again in the news, is an American tradition

  • Written by Jonathan Obert, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Amherst College
imageArmed white citizens and police have historically worked together in the U.S., though it's not clear whether that's what's happening here.George Frey/Getty Images

It’s a contentious time in the U.S., with a pandemic, racial equality, police violence and a presidential election all occupying people’s attention. Given all that stress, it...

Read more: Vigilantism, again in the news, is an American tradition

With prizes, food, housing and cash, Putin rigged Russia's most recent vote

  • Written by Regina Smyth, Professor, Indiana University
imageRussian President Vladimir Putin at a polling station to cast his ballot in a nationwide vote on constitutional reforms in Moscow on July 1, 2020. Alexey Druzhinin/SPUTNIK/AFP via Getty Images)

When Russians voted in early July on 200 constitutional amendments, officials rigged the election to create the illusion that President Vladimir Putin...

Read more: With prizes, food, housing and cash, Putin rigged Russia's most recent vote

Cell-like decoys could mop up viruses in humans – including the one that causes COVID-19

  • Written by Liangfang Zhang, Professor of Nanoengineering, University of California San Diego
imageDuck decoys lure real ducks within range of hunters. Nanoparticles that look like cells serve as both decoys and hunters to ensnare virus particles.Chuck Holland/Flickr, CC BY-ND

The Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work.

The big idea

Researchers around the world are working frantically to develop COVID-19 vaccines meant to...

Read more: Cell-like decoys could mop up viruses in humans – including the one that causes COVID-19

When states pass social liberalization laws, they create regional advantages for innovation

  • Written by Laurina Zhang, Assistant Professor of Strategy & Innovation, Boston University
imageMarriage equality supporters in 2006 probably had no idea the law they advocated would spur innovation.Darren McCollester/Getty Images News via Getty Images

What conditions lead to world-changing innovation? It’s an important question for business and government leaders.

Contrary to the traditional notion of the solitary scientist, new...

Read more: When states pass social liberalization laws, they create regional advantages for innovation

Aerosols are a bigger coronavirus threat than WHO guidelines suggest – here's what you need to know

  • Written by Byron Erath, Associate professor of fluid mechanics, Clarkson University
imageAerosols are made up of tiny respiratory droplets suspended in the air.Jeffrey Coolidge via Getty Images

When someone coughs, talks or even breathes, they send tiny respiratory droplets into the surrounding air. The smallest of these droplets can float for hours, and there is strong evidence that they can carry live coronavirus if the person is...

Read more: Aerosols are a bigger coronavirus threat than WHO guidelines suggest – here's what you need to know

Simply scrapping the SAT won't make colleges more diverse

  • Written by Guadalupe I. Lozano, Director, Center for University Education Scholarship, and Associate Reserach Professor of Mathematics, University of Arizona
imageCollege entrance exams are being rethought.Johnny Louis/Getty Images

When the University of California decided in early 2020 to stop using the ACT and SAT in admissions by 2025, the decision sparked discussions anew about how fair and useful college entrance exams are in the first place.

Studies have shown, for instance, that some SAT questions syste...

Read more: Simply scrapping the SAT won't make colleges more diverse

When Trump pushed hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19, hundreds of thousands of prescriptions followed despite little evidence that it worked

  • Written by Richard L. Kravitz, Professor of Health Policy and Internal Medicine, University of California, Davis
imageAs public figures and some in the media touted hydroxychloroquine, prescriptions skyrocketed. Grace Cary / Moment via Getty Images

In late March and early April, President Trump repeatedly proclaimed that hydroxychloroquine could prevent or treat COVID-19. Within days, the number of prescriptions for the drug skyrocketed even though evidence it...

Read more: When Trump pushed hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19, hundreds of thousands of prescriptions...

The Supreme Court just expanded the 'ministerial exception' shielding religious employers from anti-bias laws

  • Written by Steven K. Green, Professor of Law, Director of the Center for Religion, Law & Democracy, Willamette University
imageThe ministerial exemptions ruling is one of several cases involving religious employers in front of the Supreme Court.Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis via Getty Images

Should religious employers be allowed to discriminate?

When it comes to houses of worship selecting spiritual leaders, then the answer from lower courts has long been “yes.” Even...

Read more: The Supreme Court just expanded the 'ministerial exception' shielding religious employers from...

COVID-19 exposes why the Postal Service needs to get back into the banking business

  • Written by Melanie G. Long, Assistant Professor of Economics, The College of Wooster
imageThe USPS could do more than deliver mail.AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Financial services play a major role in the economic lives of most Americans, from the moment their paychecks are directly deposited into a bank account to the loan taken out to buy their first home or car.

Yet over 12 million people – about 6% of U.S. adults – cannot access...

Read more: COVID-19 exposes why the Postal Service needs to get back into the banking business

More Articles ...

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  2. Srebrenica, 25 years later: Lessons from the massacre that ended the Bosnian conflict and unmasked a genocide
  3. Sending international students home would sap US influence and hurt the economy
  4. COVID-19 makes clear that bioethics must confront health disparities
  5. Street vendors make cities livelier, safer and fairer – here's why they belong on the post-COVID-19 urban scene
  6. Corporate activism is more than a marketing gimmick
  7. 5 COVID-19 myths politicians have repeated that just aren't true
  8. Synthetic odors created by activating brain cells help neuroscientists understand how smell works
  9. Why are scientists trying to manufacture organs in space?
  10. Brazil's Bolsonaro has COVID-19 – and so do thousands of Indigenous people who live days from the nearest hospital
  11. 3 things 'ZeroZeroZero' gets right about the cocaine trade
  12. It takes a long time to vote
  13. Supreme Court hands victory to school voucher lobby – will religious minorities, nonbelievers and state autonomy lose out?
  14. COVID-19: As offices reopen, here's what to expect if you're worried about getting sick on the job
  15. Should architecturally significant low-income housing be preserved?
  16. Is the COVID-19 pandemic cure really worse than the disease? Here's what our research found
  17. Rare neurological disorder, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, linked to COVID-19
  18. There are many leaders of today's protest movement – just like the civil rights movement
  19. Supreme Court reforms, strengthens Electoral College
  20. Social isolation: The COVID-19 pandemic's hidden health risk for older adults, and how to manage it
  21. What makes a 'wave' of disease? An epidemiologist explains
  22. How did 'white' become a metaphor for all things good?
  23. Digital contact tracing's mixed record abroad spells trouble for US efforts to rein in COVID-19
  24. Lessons from the 1918 pandemic: A U.S. city's past may hold clues
  25. Decades of failed reforms allow continued police brutality and racism
  26. Retractions and controversies over coronavirus research show that the process of science is working as it should
  27. 'Renewable' natural gas may sound green, but it's not an antidote for climate change
  28. Islam's anti-racist message from the 7th century still resonates today
  29. Six eyewitnesses misidentified a murderer – here's what went wrong in the lineup
  30. Nearly 3 in 4 US moms were in the workforce before the COVID-19 pandemic – is that changing?
  31. Ethical challenges loom over decisions to resume in-person college classes
  32. Why some Americans seem more 'American' than others
  33. A leading infectious disease expert explains how to be as safe as possible on this very different Fourth
  34. Don't expect Biden's VP pick to make or break the 2020 election
  35. How to manage plant pests and diseases in your victory garden
  36. Mexico City buried its rivers to prevent disease and unwittingly created a dry, polluted city where COVID-19 now thrives
  37. Presidents' panel: How COVID-19 will change higher education
  38. Black churches have lagged in moving online during the pandemic – reaching across generational lines could help
  39. Why 'I was just being sarcastic' can be such a convenient excuse
  40. Police with lots of military gear kill civilians more often than less-militarized officers
  41. Do dogs really see in just black and white?
  42. Group testing for coronavirus – called pooled testing – could be the fastest and cheapest way to increase screening nationwide
  43. The invention of satanic witchcraft by medieval authorities was initially met with skepticism
  44. Video: What we can learn from a book documenting the first vaccine, for smallpox
  45. Which drugs and therapies are proven to work, and which ones don't, for COVID-19?
  46. With the help of trained dolphins, our team of researchers is building a specialized drone to help us study dolphins in the wild
  47. From marmots to mole-rats to marmosets – studying many genes in many animals is key to understanding how humans can live longer
  48. COVID-19 and teletherapy may be changing how much you know about your therapist
  49. COVID-19 and telehealth may be changing how much you know about your therapist
  50. A summer of protest, unemployment and presidential politics – welcome to 1932