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It’s often said that, ‘those who do not learn history are doomed to repeat it.’ It’s a quote that’s often thrown around in multiple walks of life; whether it’s your neighbor or an expert being interviewed about a politician’s recent actions. Indeed, history is a popular subject around the world, with many transferable skills and specialist areas that many a student come out of university with a degree in.

But do people actually listen to the messages history has for us? When it comes to information prospering, there’s no better way to learn about the world around us and the current social climate than to look back a little, and think about what the past teaches us. With that in mind, here’s some reasons why it’s more important than ever to know where we came from.  




Recent Controversy in the Museum Scene

Museums have artifacts on display, and they need them to bring the crowds in. Having an ancient item out for all the public to see exposes it to scrutiny, but it’s one of the best ways to make sure that these items are for everyone’s consumption, and that upcoming generations can always learn about those that came before them.However, the digital age means more and more people are becoming aware of what pieces may in fact be stolen, or may not belong in a country’s museum at all. There could be a piece important to the heritage of another country, and should in fact be on display there, for the relevant people to know their own history. Of course pieces can be on loan or act as parts of special displays, but this isn’t always the case.

History is Being Destroyed

Whether by accidents and stupidity, or by deliberate omissions and removals, it’s more evident than ever that a lot of history is being wiped away. It happens all across the world: from burnt churches in Norway to destroyed ancient native burial grounds in America to churches, mosques, and heritage laden areas being obliterated by ISIL. It’s something we shouldn’t ignore, and it’s something that’s happening more and more because of the capability of the modern era.


Of course, companies such as Andrew Long and Associates exist out there to handle the legal side of heritage matters, and to make sure conservation sites and those of significant historical meaning/interest are never harmed in favour of someone making a profit. But that doesn’t mean we live in a perfect world where this kind of destruction never takes place. Some good advice is to be aware of the area you live in, who built it in the past and who died there; when you’ve got your heritage in mind, you’re going to be using history for good.

It’s time to really think about the way we take in the information we get from textbooks, museums, and all the lectures professors give us. The modern age makes history much more relevant, and you should always use this to learn.