News Pronto

The Conversation

The most important dam you probably haven't heard of

  • Written by Jennifer Drake, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto

Large dams are major nation-building projects. They harness power to generate energy, provide water for large-scale irrigation and can help control flooding. And politicians often describe them as symbols of national power and technical prowess.

The early 20th century is known as the “golden age” of dam building in the United States....

Read more: The most important dam you probably haven't heard of

Why has Japan's massacre of disabled gone unnoticed? For answers, look to the past

  • Written by Rachel Adams, Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University
imageIs there an ongoing ambivalence toward people living with disabilities?James Emery, CC BY

On July 26, 2016 a man wielding a knife broke into Tsukui Yamayuriena, a home for the disabled outside of Tokyo and brutally murdered 19 people as they slept, while injuring another 26. Afterwards, he turned himself in to a local police station, with the...

Read more: Why has Japan's massacre of disabled gone unnoticed? For answers, look to the past

Guns in Donald Trump's America

  • Written by Jonathan M. Metzl, Director, Center for Medicine, Health, and Society; Professor of Sociology and Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University

Donald Trump’s new outreach to “minority voters” is already showing signs of strain.

Soon after the shooting death of Nykea Aldridge, cousin of basketball star Dwyane Wade, Trump sent a controversial tweet:

Trump’s missive drew widespread condemnation for its opportunism and insensitivity, particularly in the context of...

Read more: Guns in Donald Trump's America

Finding better ways to get hydrogen fuel from water

  • Written by Peter Byrley, Ph.D. Candidate in Chemical Engineering, University of California, Riverside
imageHydrogen fueling stations like this could become more common if materials scientists and other researchers keep pushing for new breakthroughs.fueling station photo via shutterstock.com

With hydrogen power stations in California, a new Japanese consumer car and portable hydrogen fuel cells for electronics, hydrogen as a zero emission fuel source is...

Read more: Finding better ways to get hydrogen fuel from water

A tale of two GDPs: Why Republicans and Democrats live in different economic realities

  • Written by Ian Anson, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
imageWhich economy do you live in?Partisan minds via www.shutterstock.com

Back in 1992, Democratic strategist James Carville uttered his famous recommendation to Bill Clinton ahead of the 1992 election: “It’s the economy, stupid!” Political scientists beat Carville to the punch, though: As far back as the 1950’s, scholars were...

Read more: A tale of two GDPs: Why Republicans and Democrats live in different economic realities

How victims of terror are remembered distorts perceptions of safety

  • Written by Richard Lachmann, Professor of Sociology, University at Albany, State University of New York

Are Americans safe from terrorism?

Forty-nine dead in Orlando, five in Dallas and three in Baton Rouge in 2016. Twelve dead in San Bernardino, three at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs and nine at a church in Charleston in 2015.

In addition, Americans watched ample news coverage of the attacks in Nice and Brussels in 2016, and two far...

Read more: How victims of terror are remembered distorts perceptions of safety

Will a merged Tesla-SolarCity put a solar-powered battery in every home?

  • Written by W. Rocky Newman, Professor of Management, Farmer School of Business, Miami University
imageThe linchpin to Tesla's proposed merger with SolarCity is the Gigafactory and whether it can lower costs and improve battery performance.Tesla Motors

One year ago Tesla Motors announced plans to build its Gigafactory to produce huge numbers of batteries, giving life to the old saying, “if you want something done right, do it yourself.”

By...

Read more: Will a merged Tesla-SolarCity put a solar-powered battery in every home?

Fentanyl and other synthetic opioids sold as counterfeits in deadly new trend

  • Written by Samuel Banister, Research Fellow, Stanford University

In March and April, 56 people in the Sacramento area were hospitalized after taking Norco brand hydrocodone pills. Fifteen died.

But, as we discovered, these pills were not pharmaceutical hydrocodone at all. They were counterfeits containing fentanyl that were purchased on the street. Fentanyl is an opioid far more powerful than hydrocodone....

Read more: Fentanyl and other synthetic opioids sold as counterfeits in deadly new trend

How men benefit from family-friendly tenure policies

  • Written by Kelly Bedard, Professor of Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara
imageWhy aren't there as many female tenured professors?Sarah, CC BY-NC

On Friday, August 26, as we celebrate Women’s Equality Day – a day marking the 96th anniversary of the 19th Amendment that guaranteed women the right to vote – it is a time to reflect both on the progress that has been made on gender equality and on how much work...

Read more: How men benefit from family-friendly tenure policies

Failed coup in Turkey means thousands are voting with their feet

  • Written by Ibrahim Sirkeci, Professor of Transnational Studies and Marketing & Director of Regent's Centre for Transnational Studies, Regent's University London

Turkey is facing a new danger – brain drain.

On July 15, a group within the Turkish military staged a coup.

It failed. But since then, the Turkish government has restricted rights and freedoms of its people. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has stepped up the pressure on Fethullah Gulen and his supporters. Gulen, a U.S.-based Muslim...

Read more: Failed coup in Turkey means thousands are voting with their feet

More Articles ...

  1. Scientists at work: Public archaeologists dig before the construction crews do
  2. Russia's aggressive power is resurgent, online and off
  3. Polio eradication effort challenged, but not derailed
  4. Rebuilding ground zero: How twin mandates of revival and remembrance reshaped Lower Manhattan
  5. Corporate sponsors at Yosemite? The case against privatizing national parks
  6. The real reason the EpiPen and other off-patents are so expensive
  7. David Duke, Donald Trump and the dog whistle
  8. Fracking and health: What we know from Pennsylvania's natural gas boom
  9. Could gay-straight alliances reduce school bullying?
  10. This little-known pioneering educator put coding in the classroom
  11. Understanding mosquitoes can help us find better ways to kill them
  12. Getting serious about funny: Psychologists see humor as a character strength
  13. Who dies in police custody? Texas, California offer new tools to find out
  14. What's ailing the ACA: Insurers or Congress?
  15. Why silence continues to surround pregnancy discrimination in the workplace
  16. Playing at torture, a not so trivial pursuit
  17. How the Islamic State recruits and coerces children
  18. Voter ID laws: Why black Democrats' fight for the ballot in Mississippi still matters
  19. Get better election predictions by combining diverse forecasts
  20. Harried doctors can make diagnostic errors: They need time to think
  21. How Dostoevsky predicted Trump's America
  22. Suburban sprawl and poor preparation worsened flood damage in Louisiana
  23. Louisiana's Cajun Navy shines light on growing value of boat rescuers
  24. King Coal is dethroned in the US – and that's good news for the environment
  25. Slavery on campus – recovering the history of Washington College's discarded slaves
  26. Relationship advice from the government doesn't help low-income couples – here's what might
  27. How racism has shaped welfare policy in America since 1935
  28. Big Tobacco aims its guns to kill California tobacco tax
  29. Why we're wrong to blame immigrants for our sputtering economies
  30. With skateboarding's inclusion in Tokyo 2020, a once-marginalized subculture enters the spotlight
  31. How bigotry crushed the dreams of an all-black Little League team
  32. From wine to weed: Keeping the marijuana farm small and local
  33. After the NSA hack: Cybersecurity in an even more vulnerable world
  34. Can a single region in Florida show the state how to adapt to climate change?
  35. Should writing for the public count toward tenure?
  36. What does social science say about how a female president might lead?
  37. A pregnant woman's immune response could lead to brain disorders in her kids
  38. DOJ report on Baltimore echoes centuries-old limits on African-American freedom in the Charm City
  39. How companies learn what children secretly want
  40. Algorithms can be more fair than humans
  41. Nuclear power deserves a level playing field
  42. Compete or suckle: Should troubled nuclear reactors be subsidized?
  43. Is misuse of prescription painkillers among youth athletes leading to heroin use?
  44. Why the guns-on-campus debate matters for American higher education
  45. Here's what coworkers think when you suck up to your boss
  46. Don't run (and don't laugh): The little-known history of racewalking
  47. Disasters and kids – how to help them recover
  48. The political role of drone strikes in US grand strategy
  49. Range anxiety? Today's electric cars can cover vast majority of daily U.S. driving needs
  50. Not easy being blue: Fatal shootings, job stress make it hard to be a cop