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Why silence continues to surround pregnancy discrimination in the workplace

  • Written by Michelle D. Deardorff, Adolph S. Ochs Professor of Government and Head of Political Science and Public Service, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
imageHourly workers make up the lion's share of pregnancy discrimination cases. Pregnant worker via www.shutterstock.com

During the 2016 presidential election, we’ve seen an unusual amount of interest in issues regarding gender equality in the workplace. Discussions of equal pay, the glass ceiling and affordable child care are not typical talking...

Read more: Why silence continues to surround pregnancy discrimination in the workplace

Playing at torture, a not so trivial pursuit

  • Written by Nicholas Bowman, Associate Professor of Communication Studies, West Virginia University

From 2003 to 2009, Camp Bucca was a detention facility used by the U.S. military to house prisoners from the Iraq War. As early as 2004, news reports surfaced that the camp was the site of prisoner abuse and torture. Some military experts have linked this abuse and torture to the formation of the Islamic State, or ISIS, group.

By the end of 2016,...

Read more: Playing at torture, a not so trivial pursuit

How the Islamic State recruits and coerces children

  • Written by Mia Bloom, Professor of Communication, Georgia State University

This week the world once again witnessed an Islamic State’s use of at least one child bomber, perhaps two.

A child between the ages of 12 and 14 was reportedly the culprit behind a suicide attack – blowing up the wedding of Besna and Nurettin Akdogan in Gaziantep, Turkey and killing 54 people on Aug. 20.

Although now the Turkish...

Read more: How the Islamic State recruits and coerces children

Voter ID laws: Why black Democrats' fight for the ballot in Mississippi still matters

  • Written by Frederick Knight, Associate Professor of History, Morehouse College
imageAfrican-American children gather around a voter registration sign.Kheel Center/flickr, CC BY

This fall, we are faced with the question of who will become president. And equally important – who can vote?

Over the past decade, Republican lawmakers in more than 20 states have enacted laws making it harder to vote. In the most extreme cases, they...

Read more: Voter ID laws: Why black Democrats' fight for the ballot in Mississippi still matters

Get better election predictions by combining diverse forecasts

  • Written by Andreas Graefe, Research Fellow at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism (Columbia School of Journalism) and at LMU Munich, Professor for CRM at Macromedia University, Munich, Germany, Columbia University
imageMany, and varied, inputs make better predictions.Hands up image via shutterstock.com

Imagine you are among the legions of pundits and political commentators striving to predict the outcome of November’s presidential election. You’re not just interested in who will win – most citizens can predict that, it turns out. You want to...

Read more: Get better election predictions by combining diverse forecasts

Harried doctors can make diagnostic errors: They need time to think

  • Written by Vineet Chopra, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and Research Scientist, University of Michigan
imageThinking too fast?ER image via www.shutterstock.com.

When a person goes to the doctor, there’s usually one thing they want: a diagnosis. Once a diagnosis is made, a path toward wellness can begin.

In some cases, diagnoses are fairly obvious. But in others, they aren’t.

Consider the following: A 50-year-old man with a history of high blood...

Read more: Harried doctors can make diagnostic errors: They need time to think

How Dostoevsky predicted Trump's America

  • Written by Ani Kokobobo, Assistant Professor of Russian Literature, University of Kansas
imagePortrait of Fyodor Dostoyevsky, by Vasily Perov (1872).Vasily Perov/Wikimedia Commons

As a professor of Russian literature, I’ve come to realize that it’s never a good sign when real life resembles a Fyodor Dostoevsky novel.

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, with its riotous rhetoric and steady stream of scandals, calls to mind...

Read more: How Dostoevsky predicted Trump's America

Suburban sprawl and poor preparation worsened flood damage in Louisiana

  • Written by Craig E. Colten, Carl O. Sauer Professor of Geography, Louisiana State University
imageU.S. Coast Guard personnel rescue stranded residents in Baton Rouge on August 14, 2016U.S. Department of Agriculture/Wikipedia, CC BY

This month’s extraordinary flooding in southeast Louisiana damaged some 40,000 homes, prompting more than 70,000 people to sign up for FEMA assistance. The proximate cause was a slow-moving storm system that...

Read more: Suburban sprawl and poor preparation worsened flood damage in Louisiana

Louisiana's Cajun Navy shines light on growing value of boat rescuers

  • Written by Tricia Wachtendorf, Associate Professor of Sociology, Director of Disaster Research Center, University of Delaware

As we look at the devastating losses suffered by Louisiana communities from the recent flooding, one of the inspiring aspects to emerge from the disaster are the reports of the “Cajun Navy” – everyday residents in their boats checking on and rescuing family, friends, neighbors and even strangers in need.

The efforts of the Cajun...

Read more: Louisiana's Cajun Navy shines light on growing value of boat rescuers

King Coal is dethroned in the US – and that's good news for the environment

  • Written by Lucas Davis, Associate Professor, University of California, Berkeley
imageA number of coal plants in the U.S. are closing in response to competition from inexpensive and cleaner natural gas. booleansplit/flickr, CC BY-NC

This is the worst year in decades for U.S. coal. During the first six months of 2016, U.S. coal production was down a staggering 28 percent compared to 2015, and down 33 percent compared to 2014. For...

Read more: King Coal is dethroned in the US – and that's good news for the environment

More Articles ...

  1. Slavery on campus – recovering the history of Washington College's discarded slaves
  2. Relationship advice from the government doesn't help low-income couples – here's what might
  3. How racism has shaped welfare policy in America since 1935
  4. Big Tobacco aims its guns to kill California tobacco tax
  5. Why we're wrong to blame immigrants for our sputtering economies
  6. With skateboarding's inclusion in Tokyo 2020, a once-marginalized subculture enters the spotlight
  7. How bigotry crushed the dreams of an all-black Little League team
  8. From wine to weed: Keeping the marijuana farm small and local
  9. After the NSA hack: Cybersecurity in an even more vulnerable world
  10. Can a single region in Florida show the state how to adapt to climate change?
  11. Should writing for the public count toward tenure?
  12. What does social science say about how a female president might lead?
  13. A pregnant woman's immune response could lead to brain disorders in her kids
  14. DOJ report on Baltimore echoes centuries-old limits on African-American freedom in the Charm City
  15. How companies learn what children secretly want
  16. Algorithms can be more fair than humans
  17. Nuclear power deserves a level playing field
  18. Compete or suckle: Should troubled nuclear reactors be subsidized?
  19. Is misuse of prescription painkillers among youth athletes leading to heroin use?
  20. Why the guns-on-campus debate matters for American higher education
  21. Here's what coworkers think when you suck up to your boss
  22. Don't run (and don't laugh): The little-known history of racewalking
  23. Disasters and kids – how to help them recover
  24. The political role of drone strikes in US grand strategy
  25. Range anxiety? Today's electric cars can cover vast majority of daily U.S. driving needs
  26. Not easy being blue: Fatal shootings, job stress make it hard to be a cop
  27. Making college matter
  28. Turkey's post-coup commitment to democracy offers chance to resolve Kurdish crisis
  29. Are U.S. politics beyond a joke?
  30. Parasitic flies, zombified ants, predator beetles – insect drama on Mexican coffee plantations
  31. Beyond borders: Why we need global action to protect migratory birds
  32. Why science and engineering need to remind students of forgotten lessons from history
  33. So what if some female Olympians have high testosterone?
  34. Why get a liberal education? It is the life and breath of medicine
  35. Breaking the fourth wall in human-computer interaction: Really talking to each other
  36. Dusty plasma in the universe and in the laboratory
  37. Is the US electoral system really 'rigged'?
  38. How the IOC effectively maintains a gag order on nonsponsors of the Olympics
  39. As Rio bay waters show, we badly need innovation in treating human wastes
  40. Cotton farmers profit from simple steps to help pollinators
  41. Is the 'lesser of two evils' an ethical choice for voters?
  42. Setting robots in motion, quickly and efficiently
  43. How adult learners are not getting 21st-century skills
  44. Why you shouldn't want to always be happy
  45. Trump's and Clinton's economy plans: eight essential reads
  46. Most students borrow for college, but are they financially literate?
  47. Turkey's coup and the call to prayer: Sounds of violence meet Islamic devotionals
  48. When disaster-response apps fail
  49. Uber's Didi deal dispels Chinese 'El Dorado' myth once and for all
  50. What can a 1.7-million-year-old hominid fossil teach us about cancer?
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