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In a post-truth election, clicks trump facts

  • Written by Matthew Jordan, Associate Professor of Media Studies, Pennsylvania State University
imageDigital media has feasted off Donald Trump's lies.Nick Lehr/The Conversation, CC BY-SA

One thing about the 2016 presidential race is undeniable: Donald Trump has lied or misled at an unprecedented level. Over 70 percent of his statements, according to Politifact, are “mostly false,” “false” or “pants on fire...

Read more: In a post-truth election, clicks trump facts

Trump's wall ignores the economic logic of undocumented immigrant labor

  • Written by Lise Nelson, Associate Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Associate Professor of Geography, Pennsylvania State University

In the final weeks of his campaign, Donald Trump has reiterated his call to build a wall between Mexico and the United States. A Pew Research survey shows his supporters are united by, perhaps more than any other issue, anti-immigrant sentiment.

To him, like many of his supporters, this wave of invading “criminals” supported and abetted...

Read more: Trump's wall ignores the economic logic of undocumented immigrant labor

Americans and Russians see the world differently, and that's hurting Syrians

  • Written by Laura Roselle, Professor of Political Science and Policy Studies, Elon University

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry recently said that he sometimes feels like he’s living in a “parallel universe” compared to his Russian counterpart when it comes to Syria.

This parallel universe can be explained by analyzing the strategic narratives of the United States and Russia since the end of the Cold War.

My forthcoming...

Read more: Americans and Russians see the world differently, and that's hurting Syrians

Alcoholism research: A virus could manipulate neurons to reduce the desire to drink

  • Written by Yifeng Cheng, Ph.D. Candidate, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, Texas A&M University
imageHeavy drinking can cause brain changes that make you want to drink more. Alcohol shots image via www.shutterstock.com.

About 17 million adults and more than 850,000 adolescents had some problems with alcohol in the United States in 2012. Long-term alcohol misuse could harm your liver, stomach, cardiovascular system and bones, as well as your brain....

Read more: Alcoholism research: A virus could manipulate neurons to reduce the desire to drink

Why sports fans need villains

  • Written by Vassilis Dalakas, Professor of Marketing, California State University San Marcos

As the new NBA season begins, the Golden State Warriors find themselves in an unfamiliar role: villain.

After the Warriors drafted Stephen Curry from unheralded Davidson College in 2009, fans across the country became enamored with his exciting style of play. Through the years, the team added players to complement Curry’s scoring prowess...

Read more: Why sports fans need villains

Is Clinton or Trump a better choice for parents?

  • Written by Renee Cramer, Professor of Law, Politics and Society, Drake University

When asked, at the close of the second presidential debate, to say something nice about her opponent, Hillary Clinton responded by complimenting Donald Trump’s children. They are, she said, “able and devoted.”

Parenting has been a central theme of this election cycle. As part of an effort to render Clinton more vibrantly human,...

Read more: Is Clinton or Trump a better choice for parents?

What does Trump have to do with the Hindu sacred syllable, om?

  • Written by Finnian M.M. Gerety, Visiting Assistant Professor, Religious Studies, Brown University
imageA poster of Hindus for Trump, which shows Donald Trump in a 'yogi' pose.HIndus for Trump

Republican nominee Donald Trump was recently invited to a fundraising event organized by a conservative group of Hindu Americans, the Republican Hindu Coalition. A poster from the event, which describes the group as “Hindus for Trump,” portrays the...

Read more: What does Trump have to do with the Hindu sacred syllable, om?

As incomes rise in China, so does concern about pollution

  • Written by Matthew Kahn, Professor of Economics, University of Southern California – Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

Over the last 40 years, hundreds of millions of people in China have escaped poverty as this enormous nation urbanized and became a manufacturing powerhouse fueled by cheap coal and cheap labor. But this development strategy has imposed enormous environmental costs on the Chinese people. Air pollution levels have soared, rural areas face severe...

Read more: As incomes rise in China, so does concern about pollution

Why requiring low-nicotine cigarettes is still ill-advised

  • Written by Lynn T. Kozlowski, Professor, Department of Community Health and Health Behavior, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
imageWill a low-nicotine cigarette work for people who love to smoke?From www.shutterstock.com

Global policymakers will soon consider a policy of requiring that only reduced-nicotine cigarettes can be manufactured or sold. This may sound good, but as someone who has studied tobacco for decades, I believe it is premature to deploy this as a tool to...

Read more: Why requiring low-nicotine cigarettes is still ill-advised

Want to help free trade's losers? Make 'adjustment assistance' more than just burial insurance

  • Written by Marina v. N. Whitman, Professor of Business Administration and Public Policy, University of Michigan

If there’s one thing that nearly all economists agree on, it’s that getting rid of trade restrictions is generally good for a country’s economy.

Doing so leads to a higher national income, faster economic growth, higher productivity and more competition and innovation. Freer trade also tends to lower prices and improve the...

Read more: Want to help free trade's losers? Make 'adjustment assistance' more than just burial insurance

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  5. Why it's your job to get a flu shot – and call in sick if you do get the flu
  6. With the familiar Cavendish banana in danger, can science help it survive?
  7. What Ted Nugent and Demi Lovato can do for Trump and Clinton
  8. Fact-checking Clinton and Trump is not enough
  9. The Conversation US turns two
  10. The 'legitimation' crisis in the US: Why have Americans lost trust in government?
  11. How should we teach our kids to use digital media?
  12. Do programs to help doctors with substance abuse treat them fairly?
  13. How media outlets from around the world are reacting to the presidential campaign
  14. Donald Trump and the rise of white identity in politics
  15. Corporate America’s old boys’ club is dead – and that’s why Big Business couldn’t stop Trump
  16. The next frontier in medical sensing: Threads coated in nanomaterials
  17. Religious feelings could sway the vote in 2016 election
  18. Moving toward computing at the speed of thought
  19. Could the candidates truly fix – or nix – Obamacare? Six essential reads
  20. How was French cuisine toppled as the king of fine dining?
  21. From voting to writing a will: The simple power of making a plan
  22. Final presidential debate is a tactical victory for Clinton
  23. How Western companies can succeed in China
  24. How the Ouija board got its sinister reputation
  25. What do we know about marijuana's medical benefits? Two experts explain the evidence
  26. How many genes does it take to make a person?
  27. Clinton says the 'clean energy economy' will create millions of jobs. Can it?
  28. America's Nobel success is the story of immigrants
  29. Four female scholars suggest questions for the final presidential debate
  30. Securing the voting process: Four essential reads
  31. How does Obama's use of unilateral powers compare to other presidents?
  32. How sexual partner abuse has changed with social media
  33. What the presidential candidates' data can tell us about Trump and Clinton
  34. Why is the US Green Party so irrelevant?
  35. Digital health devices are great, but their prices are widening the health gap
  36. How to involve more women and girls in engineering
  37. Why do science issues seem to divide us along party lines?
  38. Why inequality is the most important economic challenge facing the next president
  39. Brexit and Trump are bad for our health
  40. Evangelical Christians are on the left too
  41. Why newspaper endorsements might matter more in this election
  42. Thousands of people didn't evacuate before Hurricane Matthew. Why not?
  43. No, Bob Dylan isn't the first lyricist to win the Nobel
  44. The Jewish vote may swing key undecided counties, study says
  45. One step toward making criminal justice less biased
  46. We could prevent millions of cancer deaths each year with knowledge we already have
  47. Dems and the GOP are miles apart on yet another issue: Public lands
  48. Straight girls do kiss on campus, but what about those who don't go to college?
  49. Do you buy a smartphone for its curves? Do you buy a car for its cup holders?
  50. What we can learn from Trump’s $916 million loss